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Research cooperation cannot be put at risk


Research cooperation cannot be put at risk


International research cooperation is critical to addressing the world’s most pressing issues – like climate change, extreme weather events, water and food. We need research grounded in evidence and quality research practices to address these challenges.

“It is of grave concern to the New Zealand research community when events elsewhere in the world put at risk the research endeavour that is most critical to the future of humanity, including the recent restrictions on access to the United States,” says the President of the Royal Society of New Zealand Te Apārangi, Professor Richard Bedford.

As the United States plays a significant role within international research activity, with many international projects and conferences based there, there is a significant risk that the advancement of knowledge in many critical fields will be hampered if the whole global research community cannot gather and openly share new knowledge.

“The New Zealand research community openly welcomes the contributions of researchers from all over the world because the pursuit of knowledge today is truly global. Diverse views and backgrounds enrich us and add strength to research and researchers from all countries have a part to play. We want New Zealand researchers to interact with researchers from all over the world,” says Professor Bedford.

All researchers are vulnerable to limitations on engagement with others, but especially those members of the early career researchers community where participation in international research fora is especially important as they develop their expertise.

The Society is a member of the International Council for Science (ICSU) and supports the Principle of the Universality of Science, which acknowledges the importance of freedom of movement, association, expression and communication for scientists, as well as equitable access to data, information, and other resources for research. We provide executive support to ICSU’s Committee on Freedom and Responsibility in the Conduct of Science.

ENDS

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