Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 

25 years of science working for New Zealand

25 years of science working for New Zealand

Crown Research Institutes celebrate 25 years of excellent science

Twenty-five years ago – on 1 July 1992 – the Government re-shaped the nation’s science research organisations into ten Crown Research Institutes.

The milestone of 25 years will be marked across the course of this year by the now 7 CRIs – AgResearch, ESR, GNS Science, Landcare Research, NIWA, Plant & Food Research and Scion.

Collectively, the CRIs employ more than 3400 staff across 50 sites around New Zealand.

“Two-thirds of New Zealand’s publicly-funded science researchers – outside health and ICT – work for the CRIs, and New Zealand businesses turn to us for over 75 per cent of their external R&D work”, said Anthony Scott, Chief Executive of Science New Zealand, the collective voice of the CRIs.

“We apply the best science knowledge to the opportunities and threats for New Zealand. We work with communities, Maori, local and central government and businesses to provide the science and technology that makes a difference for New Zealand.

“The milestone of 25 years gives us an opportunity to reflect on what has been achieved by so many dedicated people, past and present, across the CRIs. This is a celebration of their expertise and skill, creativity, and passion to deliver impact for New Zealand.

“Our task is always to look to the future – what are the opportunities for New Zealand, what are the risks – how can we continue to protect, enhance and develop New Zealand’s future wealth and well-being?”

A series of events are planned for the milestone year, starting this week with a social media blitz from all CRIs demonstrating the excellent science making an impact for New Zealand.

In November, Parliament and Te Papa will host events for past and present CRI staff and others who have been involved in the success of the CRIs. These events will also include public talks and displays.

During the year, individual CRIs will open their doors at various sites around New Zealand and host public and sector-specific activities.

Anthony Scott says “We work for the people of New Zealand, so we are always keen to listen and engage with them, and to share our research and how it is applied. The milestone of 25 years is another opportunity to do this, and to explore the possibilities for New Zealand’s future.”

Science New Zealand promotes the value of science and technology for New Zealand. Its Board comprises the CEOs of the Crown Research Institutes which collectively employ 3,400 staff, with annual revenues of $677 million. Two-thirds of the nation’s publicly-funded science researchers, outside health and IT, work at CRIs and CRIs undertake three-quarters of research contracted by New Zealand businesses.

The Crown Research Institutes undertake science research for the public and private sector in New Zealand and abroad. They also provide the essential underlying capability in people, facilities and knowledge for the long-term future of science and innovation in New Zealand.

The Crown Research Institutes are: AgResearch, ESR, GNS Science, Landcare Research, NIWA, Plant & Food Research, and Scion.

Follow them for updates on their work and impact on New Zealand through Twitter, Facebook and their individual websites.

Science sector reforms 1980s and 1990s:

The creation of CRIs in 1992 was part of several reform measures in the science and innovation sector. It included forming the Ministry of Research, Science & Technology (MoRST) in 1989 and the Foundation for Research, Science & Technology (FRST) in 1990. The government’s objective was to encourage greater R&D engagement with the social, environmental and economic sectors of New Zealand, increase the level of R&D across the board, while ensuring corporate discipline and efficiency.

Of the ten initial institutes, the social science institute work was largely absorbed into the other CRIs after two years; two CRIs (HortResearch and Crop & Food Research) merged to form Plant & Food Research in 2008; and IRL became part of Callaghan Innovation in 2013.

The CRI Act 1992: requires that CRIs must undertake research for the benefit of New Zealand, pursue excellence, be socially responsible and comply with ethical standards. In doing so, a CRI must be “financially viable” to ensure that it makes sufficient surplus so that it can reinvest in its people and facilities. The Government’s CRI Taskforce of 2010, under Sir Neville Jordan, reinforced that objective, stating “the measure of a CRI’s success should be the positive impact it has on New Zealand – be that economic, social or environmental – not the commercial return a CRI has been able to achieve.”


ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Superu Report: Land Regulation Drives Auckland House Prices

Land use regulation is responsible for up to 56 per cent of the cost of an average house in Auckland according to a new research report quantifying the impact of land use regulations, Finance Minister Steven Joyce says. More>>

ALSO:

Fletcher Whittled: Fletcher Dumps Adamson In Face Of Dissatisfaction

Fletcher Building has taken the unusual step of dumping its chief executive, Mark Adamson, as the company slashed its full-year earnings guidance and flagged an impairment against Australian assets. More>>

ALSO:

No More Dog Docking: New Animal Welfare Regulations Progressed

“These 46 regulations include stock transport, farm husbandry, companion and working animals, pigs, layer hens and the way animals are accounted for in research, testing and teaching.” More>>

ALSO:

Employment: Most Kiwifruit Contractors Breaking Law

A Labour Inspectorate operation targeting the kiwifruit industry in Bay of Plenty has found the majority of labour hire contractors are breaching their obligations as employers. More>>

ALSO:

'Work Experience': Welfare Group Opposes The Warehouse Workfare

“This programme is about exploiting unemployed youth, not teaching them skills. The government are subsidising the Warehouse in the name of reducing benefit dependency,” says Vanessa Cole, spokesperson for Auckland Action Against Poverty. More>>

ALSO:

Internet Taxes: Labour To Target $600M In Unpaid Taxes From Multinationals

The Labour Party would target multinationals operating in New Zealand to ensure they don't avoid paying tax if it wins power and is targeting $600 million over three years through a "diverted profits tax," says leader Andrew Little. More>>

ALSO: