Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 

Trial finds aspirin does not speed leg ulcer healing

Trial finds aspirin does not speed leg ulcer healing


Suggestions that aspirin may help treat venous leg ulcers have been rebutted by University of Auckland research, leaving the sufferers with compression therapy, a treatment known since the 17th Century.

Venous ulcers are chronic wounds of the lower leg. They are more common in older people. District nurses and general practitioners manage most venous ulcers in the community. They are often painful, disabling and very slow to heal.

About 1 percent of the adult population will develop a venous leg ulcer during any one year. Compression therapy, either in the form of bandage systems or hosiery, is the main treatment. But in trials of venous leg ulcers about half the participants remain unhealed after three months of treatment.

Some evidence suggested aspirin might increase venous ulcer healing, but a new randomised controlled trial just published in the British Medical Journal challenges that view.

Funded by the New Zealand Health Research Council and conducted by researchers at the University’s National Institute for Health Innovation, Aspirin4VLU trial found 150 mg aspirin a day in addition to compression bandaging did not increase venous ulcer healing.

Seven out of every 10 people with leg ulcers who took aspirin healed within six months compared with eight out of every 10 people in the placebo group.

Associate Professor Andrew Jull who led the trial says while he had hoped aspirin might help with healing, it is still good news. “It means people who have a venous leg ulcer and who have to take aspirin for other reasons still heal at a pretty good rate if they use compression.”

The researchers recruited 251 participants through community nursing services in Dunedin, Christchurch, the Waikato, Counties Manukau and Auckland district health boards over two years from 2015.

“We will shortly be getting in touch with the participants to let them and their doctors know which drug they were taking,” says Dr Jull. “We remain very grateful to those people who came forward to be part of the study – without them we would not have the evidence to help others.”

Aspirin4VLU is the world’s largest aspirin trial yet conducted for patients with venous ulcers and the only trial of low dose aspirin.


ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Mycoplasma Bovis: More Properties Positive

One of the latest infected properties is in the Hastings district, the other three are within a farming enterprise in Winton. The suspect property is near Ashburton. More>>

ALSO:

Manawatū Gorge Alternative: More Work Needed To Choose Route

“We are currently working closely and in partnership with local councils and other stakeholders to make the right long-term decision. It’s vital we have strong support on the new route as it will represent a very significant long-term investment and it will need to serve the region and the country for decades to come.” More>>

ALSO:

RBNZ: Super Fund Chief To Be New Reserve Bank Governor

Adrian Orr has been appointed as Reserve Bank Governor effective from 27 March 2018, Finance Minister Grant Robertson says. More>>

ALSO:

ScoopPro: Helping PR Professionals Get More Out Of Scoop

Scoop.co.nz has been a fixture of New Zealand’s news and Public Relations infrastructure for over 18 years. However, without the financial assistance of those using Scoop in a professional context in key sectors such as Public Relations and media, Scoop will not be able to continue this service... More>>

Insurance: 2017 Worst Year On Record For Weather-Related Losses

The Insurance Council of New Zealand (ICNZ) announced today that 2017 has been the most expensive year on record for weather-related losses, with a total insured-losses value of more than $242 million. More>>

ALSO: