Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 

New research shows our true thoughts about the Internet

New research released today by InternetNZ shows that 92% of New Zealanders are concerned about young children accessing inappropriate content on the Internet.

InternetNZ commissioned market research company Colmar Brunton to conduct research on Kiwis' thoughts and attitudes to the Internet, including our hopes and fears of it.

InternetNZ Outreach and Engagement Director, Andrew Cushen, says this is a reminder for families to talk with each other about the different types of content found online, and to talk about what to do if they come across any upsetting content. We need to ensure that people of all ages feel safe on the Internet.

The research shows safety and trust online is a key theme, topping New Zealanders’ lists of concerns.

"94% of people are concerned about the security of personal data but many are not taking appropriate steps to protect themselves online," says Cushen.

Only a third of people are using two-factor or multi-factor authentication on their accounts. And under half of people are regularly backing up their content.

"These are numbers that we must try to improve in order for New Zealanders to be safe online. We all need to take personal responsibility for our safety on the Internet," says Cushen.

The Internet offers so many benefits and opportunities and Kiwis recognise this with 9 out of 10 saying the benefits of the Internet outway the negatives.

When asked what the main benefits of the Internet are, 83% said access to information - which shines light on the importance of every New Zealander being able to get online.

"As more and more of our lives are spent on the Internet - being able to access information online has now become a necessity. This is why it’s so important that we continue to try and close digital divides in New Zealand.

"Every New Zealander deserves the opportunity to harness the power of the Internet," says Cushen.

InternetNZ will continue to fund this research each year to demonstrate what people think today, and how their thinking changes over time.


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Industry Report: Growing Interactive Sector Wants Screen Grants

Introducing a coordinated plan that invests in emerging talent and allows interactive media to access existing screen industry programmes would create hundreds of hi-tech and creative industry jobs. More>>

ALSO:

Ground Rules: Government Moves To Protect Best Growing Land

“Continuing to grow food in the volumes and quality we have come to expect depends on the availability of land and the quality of the soil. Once productive land is built on, we can’t use it for food production, which is why we need to act now.” More>>

ALSO:

Royal Society: Calls For Overhaul Of Gene-Technology Regulations

An expert panel considering the implications of new technologies that allow much more controlled and precise ‘editing’ of genes, has concluded it’s time for an overhaul of the regulations and that there’s an urgent need for wide discussion and debate about gene editing... More>>

ALSO:

Retail: Card Spending Dips In July

Seasonally-adjusted electronic card spending dipped in July by 0.1 percent after being flat in June, according to Stats NZ. Economists had expected a 0.5 percent lift, according to the median in a Bloomberg poll. More>>

ALSO:

Product Stewardship: Govt Takes More Action To Reduce Waste

The Government is proposing a new way to deal with environmentally harmful products before they become waste, including plastic packing and bottles, as part of a wider plan to reduce the amount of rubbish ending up in landfills. More>>

ALSO:

Earnings Update: Fonterra Sees Up To $675m Loss On Writedowns

“While the Co-op’s FY19 underlying earnings range is within the current guidance of 10-15 cents per share, when you take into consideration these likely write-downs, we expect to make a reported loss of $590-675 million this year, which is a 37 to 42 cent loss per share." More>>

ALSO: