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Cablegate: Trafficking in Persons (Tip) Report - Zimbabwe

VZCZCXRO8416
PP RUEHBZ RUEHDU RUEHJO RUEHMR RUEHRN
DE RUEHSB #0170/01 0661325
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
P 071325Z MAR 07
FM AMEMBASSY HARARE
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC PRIORITY 1183
INFO RUCNSAD/SOUTHERN AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY
RUEHBJ/AMEMBASSY BEIJING 0072
RUEHEG/AMEMBASSY CAIRO 0013
RUEHLO/AMEMBASSY LONDON 0577
RUEHOT/AMEMBASSY OTTAWA 0176
RHMFIUU/DEPT OF HOMELAND SECURITY WASHDC
RUEHC/DEPT OF LABOR WASHDC
RUEAWJA/DEPT OF JUSTICE WASHDC
RUEATRS/DEPT OF TREASURY WASHDC

UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 10 HARARE 000170

SIPDIS

SENSITIVE
SIPDIS

AF/S FOR S. HILL
AF/RSA FOR M. HARPOLE
G/TIP FOR R. YOUSEY
DEPT FOR G, INL, DRL, PRM
DEPT PASS TO USAID FOR M. COPSON AND E. LOKEN

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: KCRM PHUM KWMN ELAB KFRD PREF SMIG
SUBJECT: TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS (TIP) REPORT - ZIMBABWE

REF: SECSTATE 202745

THIS CABLE IS SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED - PROTECT
ACCORDINGLY.

1. (SBU) This is Embassy Harare's response to questions in
paragraphs 27-30 of SECSTATE 202745.

--------
Overview
--------

-- A. (SBU) Zimbabwe is a country of origin, transit and
destination for internationally and domestically trafficked
persons. Women and young girls are the most at risk group
for trafficking. There were increasing reports that women
and children were sexually exploited in towns along the
border with South Africa, Botswana, Mozambique and Zambia.
Young women and girls are also reportedly lured out of the
country to South Africa, China, Egypt, United Kingdom, Canada
and Zambia with false employment opportunities. There are no
reliable statistics on the extent of the trafficking problem
in the country.

(SBU) Most information about trafficking comes from anecdotal
reports. The best source of information remains the Victim
Friendly Unit (VFU) of the Zimbabwe Republic Police (ZRP),
the International Organization for Migration (IOM), United
Nations Children Fund (UNICEF), and several non-governmental
organizations (NGOs) working in the area of victim
assistance. IOM is currently undertaking a five-country
(Zimbabwe, Zambia, Angola, Namibia, and Botswana) regional
study on trafficking as well as a Zimbabwe-specific study to
examine the extent of child trafficking for sexual
exploitation in the country. The government also has
requested that IOM participate in and provide funding for a
comprehensive joint study on the trafficking problem in the
country.

-- B. (SBU) Although much work remains to be done, the
government has nonetheless made progress in the past year in
combating trafficking. The government's most notable
achievements of the past year include the following:
established an inter-ministerial taskforce on trafficking;
sentenced a woman to 48 months in jail for a trafficking a
minor into prostitution; senior government officials attended
an IOM anti-trafficking seminar; law enforcement,
immigration, and social services officials attended training
on identifying and assisting trafficking victims; Parliament
ratified the UN Convention Against Transnational Organized
Crime on March 30, 2006, which opens the way for Zimbabwe to
become a party to its trafficking protocol; and senior
government officials confirmed plans to draft domestic
anti-trafficking legislation in 2007.

(SBU) Key senior government officials demonstrate the
political will necessary to comprehensively address the
trafficking problem. However, the lack of funding remains a
serious impediment to enacting anti-trafficking programs.
The government generally has a good working relationship with
international organizations and NGOs on trafficking-related
issues. IOM, UNICEF and several NGOs reported that the VFU,
immigration, and social welfare officers generally provided
good cooperation on trafficking cases and refer trafficking
victims for assistance in an expeditious manner.

(SBU) The most at risk group for trafficking appears to be
young adults and children (especially women and girls)
experiencing economic hardship and seeking a better life.
Reports of trafficking included: anecdotes from international
organizations and NGOs of young girls from Zimbabwe and
surrounding countries exchanging sex for passage into South
Africa; Zimbabweans (usually young women) being lured out of
the country with lucrative job offers or false marriage
proposals; women and children transiting through Zimbabwe to
South Africa primarily from Democratic Republic of Congo,
Malawi, Mozambique and Zambia; children working as domestic

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or agricultural workers in Zimbabwe; children trafficked from
rural areas into cities for domestic servitude or
prostitution; young girls trafficked from South Africa into
Zimbabwe for domestic servitude; and employers demanding sex
from undocumented Zimbabwean workers in South Africa, both
adults and children, under the threat of deportation.

Despite some positive signs, the worsening economic
conditions, the increasing illegal immigration to surrounding
countries, and the growing number of HIV/AIDS orphans and
child-headed households places increasing numbers of
individuals, especially children, at risk of exploitation.
Unions and NGOs report that child labor is on the rise.
Additionally, men, women and children continue to be
adversely affected by the government's ongoing campaign of
forced evictions and the demolition of homes and businesses
in several cities and towns, albeit on a much lesser scale
than during the government's infamous 2005 Operation Restore
Order in which 700,000 lost their homes, their means of
livelihood, or both.

-- C. (SBU) The government continues to show interest in
protection of victims, support of awareness campaigns, and
investigation of trafficking cases. Although the government
lacks the necessary funds to carry out most anti-trafficking
activities itself, it cooperates with efforts by IOM, UNICEF,
and NGOs on these activities. There remains, however, a
general lack of understanding about trafficking across all
government agencies, especially at the local level, and
additional training and resources are required. Overall
corruption is not a problem in this area as it does not
appear that government officials are involved in trafficking
at any level.

-- D. (SBU) The government does not systematically monitor
its anti-trafficking efforts and periodically make
information available either publicly or privately. With the
exception of the VFU, law enforcement agencies and
prosecutor's offices do not appear to regularly share
information or report on cases internally with other agencies
or offices.

----------
PREVENTION
----------

-- A. (SBU) The government, including senior officials at law
enforcement, immigration, and social welfare agencies,
acknowledge that trafficking is a problem in the country.
Senior government officials frequently speak out publicly
about the dangers of trafficking, illegal migration,
prostitution and exploitative labor conditions. However, a
few government officials are still not convinced that the
country has a large or growing trafficking problem given the
lack of quantifiable data.

-- B. (SBU) In April 2006, the government established an
inter-ministerial taskforce on trafficking, which includes
representatives from Home Affairs, Justice, Information,
Parliamentarian Affairs, Foreign Affairs, and Public Service,
Labor and Social Welfare. The VFU of the ZRP (under the
Ministry of Home Affairs), a police unit that deals with
children's and sexual abuse cases, has the lead on
investigation and tracking of trafficking cases and referral
of victims to support services. The Department of Social
Welfare (in the Ministry of Public Service, Labor and Social
Welfare) also has several programs for children at risk. The
Department of Immigration (in the Ministry of Home Affairs)
monitors borders and ports of entry for possible traffickers
and victims. The Ministry of Information collaborates on
awareness campaigns funded by international organizations and
local NGOs.

-- C. (SBU) The state-run media continues to print and air
messages about the dangers of illegal migration and that warn
the public about false employment scams, underage and forced
marriages, prostitution and exploitative labor conditions.

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During the year, IOM placed awareness messages with the
government-sponsored media and established a Safe Migration
website.

-- D. (SBU) The government is making efforts to address
women's and children's issues through new legislation and
social programs. Parliament passed a Domestic Violence Bill
in December 2006, which was enacted on March 2, 2007. The
bill includes an expanded definition of domestic violence
that covers psychological and economic abuse. It also
streamlines the protection order process and imposes a legal
duty on police to protect victims.

(SBU) In the area of children's issues, UNICEF is managing a
"pooled funding mechanism" for the "Project of Support,"
which provides funding to social welfare programs such as the
National Action Plan (NAP) for Orphans and Vulnerable
Children (OVC). Objectives of the NAP are to strengthen
coordination for OVC programs, increase the percentage of
children with birth certificates (who are then able to access
social services), increase school enrollment and retention,
and increase access to food and basic services. To date, the
project has received commitments of more than US$70 million
(over five years) from international donors.
(SBU) The Department of Social Welfare continues to provide
school fees and books through its Basic Education Assistance
Module (BEAM) and Children in Difficult Circumstances (CDC)
programs. The BEAM program pays school fees and related
expenses including books and uniforms for some
underprivileged children and AIDS orphans. Several child
welfare advocacy groups, however, reported that BEAM and
other government programs focusing on children were still
under-funded given the level of need, and the government
often used access to such programs as a political tool to
reward supporters.

(SBU) In October 2006, the Ministries of Public Service,
Labor and Social Welfare and Education, Sport and Culture
launched a joint program with UNICEF to implement the
National Girls Education Plan which seeks to keep girls in
school and address other cultural challenges such as early
marriage, abuse and economic exploitation.

(SBU) The Ministry of Public Service, Labor and Social
Welfare is collaborating with the International Labor
Organization (ILO), United Nations Development (UNDP), United
Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization
(UNESCO), UNICEF and IOM on the Elimination of the Worst
Forms of Child Labor in Zimbabwe program that will begin in
March 2007. The program will address child labor issues and
the implementation of ILO Convention 182, including
identifying the worst forms of child labor in Zimbabwe and
implementing activities pertaining to the prevention of child
labor, protection of working children, rehabilitation of the
victims and income generating measures (to make it
cost-effective for families to release children from work).

-- E. (SBU) The government generally has a good working
relationship with international organizations and NGOs on
trafficking-related issues. Unlike in the previous year,
there were no reports of government harassment of NGOs
working on the trafficking issue. IOM, Save the Children
Norway and Girl Child Network have reported that the
government (in particular the VFU of the ZRP, immigration and
social welfare) has referred numerous trafficking victims for
assistance and has demonstrated an interest in combating
trafficking.

-- F. (SBU) The Department of Immigration monitors for
evidence of trafficking but does not maintain statistics.
Senior government officials admit that the growing number of
illegal migrants deported from South Africa and Botswana
combined with a crippling lack of resources severely impede
their ability to effectively screen for trafficking victims.
According to GOZ data, South African authorities deported
109,532 Zimbabweans in 2006--more than double the 49,788
deported in 2005. The IOM Reception Center for Zimbabweans

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deported from South Africa in the border town of Beitbridge
in Zimbabwe works closely with the Departments of Immigration
and Social Welfare. IOM Zimbabwe plans include adding an
additional protection officer and building capacity to better
screen for trafficking victims (pending funding).

-- G. (SBU) The government established an inter-ministerial
taskforce on trafficking in April 2006. Additionally, the
Interpol National Central Bureau (NCB) Zimbabwe office
recently established a "Human Trafficking Desk" to coordinate
Zimbabwe's involvement in international trafficking
investigations. It is still not clear if there is adequate
coordination between the inter-ministerial taskforce and the
individual agencies involved in programs to combat
trafficking. The government does have a public corruption
commission, but it under-funded and has yet to register any
notable accomplishments.

-- H. (SBU) The government has yet to develop a national plan
of action to address trafficking in persons. The
inter-ministerial taskforce has requested that IOM
participate in and fund a joint study to assess the problem
in the country. Additionally, during interviews for this
report, key senior government officials seemed genuinely
interested in receiving assistance and training to address
the trafficking problem. For example, the legal counsel to
Parliament requested assistance in arranging for a
trafficking expert to brief the parliamentarian portfolio
committee for public service, labor and social welfare.
Additionally, the Human Trafficking Desk at Interpol NCB
Zimbabwe contacted IOM in January to request training and
collaboration on anti-trafficking efforts.

--------------------------------------------
INVESTIGATION AND PROSECUTION OF TRAFFICKERS
--------------------------------------------

-- A. (SBU) The country does not have a law specifically
prohibiting trafficking. Senior government officials have,
however, publicly stated their intention to enact
comprehensive domestic anti-trafficking legislation in 2007.
Parliament ratified the UN Convention Against Transnational
Organized Crime on March 30, 2006 and it is now with the
Ministry of Home Affairs pending the formal deposit of
instruments of ratification at the UN. According to the
legal counsel to Parliament, the legislative body plans to
take the necessary steps to ratify the UN protocol on
trafficking and incorporate its provisions into domestic law
during 2007.

(SBU) Trafficking-related crimes are currently addressed
under other legislation, primarily the Criminal Law
(Codification and Reform) Act, the Immigration Act and the
Labor Relations Amendment Act. These laws criminalize
transporting people across the border for sex, corruption of
children and allowing children to reside in or to frequent a
brothel, allowing children to consort with or be employed by
prostitutes, and forgery of travel documents. In addition,
the Criminal Law Act prohibits abduction and the pledging of
a female. The constitution and labor law provide that no one
may be held in slavery or servitude or be made to perform
forced or compulsory labor.

Zimbabwean legal experts consider these laws sufficient to
cover both internal and external forms of trafficking for
sexual exploitation. Additionally, a victim can bring a
civil suit against a trafficker under current law. The
Criminal Procedure and Evidence Act provides for victim
restitution and compensation.

-- B. (SBU) The Criminal Law Act provides for the following:

-- Procuring another person for unlawful sexual conduct, or
to become a prostitute whether inside or outside Zimbabwe, or
to leave his or her usual place of residence to become an
inmate or frequent a brothel is punishable by a fine, a
maximum imprisonment of 2 years (10 years if the person

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procured in under 16 years of age), or both.

-- Coercing or inducing another person to engage in unlawful
sexual conduct with another person by threat or intimidation
is punishable by a fine, a maximum imprisonment of 5 years,
or both.

-- Detaining a person in a brothel or any other premises with
the intention that the detained person should engage in
unlawful sexual conduct is punishable by a fine, a maximum
imprisonment of 1 year, or both.

-- Allowing a person under 16 years of age to knowing enter
an establishment for the purpose of engaging in unlawful
sexual conduct is punishable by a fine, a maximum
imprisonment of 7 years, or both. If the person is below the
age of 12, the act is punishable by a fine, a maximum
imprisonment of 10 years, or both.

-- A paren allowing a child under 18 years of age to becomea prostitute is punishable by a fine, a maximum imrisonment
of 10 years, or both.

-- Living offor facilitating prostitution is punishable by a
ine, a maximum imprisonment of 2 years, or both.
-- Solicitation of another person for prostitutionis
punishable by a fine, a maximum imprisonment f 6 months, or
both.

-- Sexual intercourse or performing indecent acts with a
person under 16 years of age is punishable by a fine, a
maximum imprisonment of 10 years, or both.

-- Pledging a female person for a forced marriage or to
compensation for the death of a relative, or any debt or
obligation is punishable by a fine, a maximum imprisonment of
2 years, or both. Any party to the marriage or arrangement
may be charged as an accomplice.

-- Forgery of a public document or corruptly using a false
document is punishable by a fine, a maximum imprisonment of
20 years, or both.

-- C. (SBU) The Labor Relations Amendment Act provides for
the following:

-- Failure of an employer to protect employees' right to fair
labor standards (including to pay any employee a wage lower
than a prescribed minimum, to require an employee to work
more than the maximum hours permitted by law, or to require
any employee to work under any conditions or situation which
are below prescribed standards) is punishable by a fine, a
maximum imprisonment of 2 years, or both.

-- Forced labor is punishable by a fine, 2 years'
imprisonment, or both.

-- Employment of a person under 15 years of age (unless as an
apprentice who is over 13 years of age) is punishable by a
fine, 2 years' imprisonment, or both.

(SBU) The Labor Relations Amendment Act does not specifically
include provisions for criminal punishment of labor
recruiters who engage in recruitment of laborers using
knowingly fraudulent or deceptive offers; for employers or
labor agents who confiscate workers' passports or travel
documents, switch contracts without the worker's consent as a
means to keep the worker in a state of service, or withhold
payment of salaries as means of keeping the worker in a state
of service. However, prosecutors may be able to use the fair
labor standards provisions in the Labor Relations Amendment
Act to pursue cases involving such activities.

-- D. (SBU) Rape and aggravated indecent assault are
punishable by life imprisonment. Incarceration is mandatory
for convictions for rape or forcible sexual assault, but

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there is no minimum penalty. The media frequently reports on
rape cases and convictions. Sentences usually vary from four
years to fifteen years, depending on the circumstances of the
crime.
-- E. (SBU) Prostitution and the activities of brothel
owner/operator, clients, pimps, and enforcers are
criminalized (as defined in the Criminal Law Act). During
the year, there were several media reports regarding
concerted efforts by police to halt prostitution throughout
the country. Police arrested both prostitutes and clients.

-- F. (SBU) During the year, the government did investigate
cases of trafficking and registered its first verifiable
conviction. The Ministry of Justice confirmed that in June
2006 a magistrate's court in the capital city of Harare
convicted a woman under the Criminal Law Act for procuring a
person for the purposes of prostitution and sentenced her to
48 months in jail, which she is currently serving. The woman
had promised the 16 year old daughter of a friend that she
could secure her a lucrative job as a nurse but forced the
girl in to prostitution.

(SBU) In addition to the case cited above, there were 9 other
persons identified as trafficking victims with cases under
investigation by the ZRP or pending in the courts (Specific
case details not for publishing):

-- a 17 year old girl lured from Masvingo to Harare in 2005
with a false job offer. The girl was subjected to sexual
exploitation and pornography. She escaped and contacted the
ZRP, who referred the girl to Girl Child Network for victim
assistance. A criminal case is pending in the Harare
Magistrate's Court (CRB# 1408/06).

-- a 14 year old orphan given by relatives to a Nigerian
trafficker who forced her into prostitution in a brothel in a
high-density suburb of Harare. She escaped in August 2006
and contacted the ZRP. The Nigerian trafficker is in
custody. A criminal case is pending in the Harare
Magistrate's Court (CRB# 1122/06).

-- a 15 year old girl lured by a false job offer to South
Africa in 2003. She was taken to Mozambique and Zambia where
she was forced into prostitution and pornography. She
escaped from the trafficker in August 2006 in Beitbridge,
Zimbabwe while preparing to cross into South Africa. She was
referred by a local NGO to IOM in Beitbridge, who alerted the
ZRP. An investigation is ongoing.

-- a 14 year old girl lured from the rural area of Mayambara
to Chitungwiza with a false job offer. She was subjected to
sexual exploitation and pornography. She escaped in August
2006 and contacted the police. An investigation is ongoing
(RRB# 1571/06).

-- 5 cases of minor girls pledged by relatives or local
chiefs to settle obligations--in all cases the girls were
forced into domestic servitude--several were sexually abused
by the receiving party. Investigations are ongoing.

(SBU) The country does not have specific laws that
criminalize the acts of labor recruiters who recruit laborers
using knowingly fraudulent or deceptive offers or impose on
recruited laborers inappropriately high or illegal fees or
commissions that create a debt bondage condition for the
laborer. The constitution and labor law, however, provide
that no one may be held in slavery or servitude or be made to
perform forced or compulsory labor.

-- G. (SBU) Most information about who is behind trafficking
comes from anecdotal reports. Traffickers involved with
trafficking to South Africa and other surrounding countries
appear to be freelance operators or small crime groups.
There are reports that trafficking to the United Kingdom,
China, Egypt and Canada involves larger organized trafficking
syndicates. Traffickers tend to target young adults and
children (especially young women and girls) in desperate

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economic circumstances with offers of lucrative jobs,
modeling contracts or scholarship opportunities. There is no
evidence of any government involvement in or tolerance of
trafficking at any level. There is no information on where
profits from trafficking are being channeled.

-- H. (SBU) The government does investigate cases of
trafficking; however, the lack of resources severely impedes
its ability. Law enforcement officials use active
investigative techniques in trafficking investigations. The
domestic laws of the country allow for full use electronic
surveillance, undercover operations, and mitigated punishment
or immunity for cooperating suspects used by the government.

-- I. (SBU) The government does not provide its own
specialized training. It did, however, take advantage of
anti-trafficking seminars and training offered by IOM and
NGOs. During the year, IOM held one seminar on trafficking
for senior government officials and four training sessions on
how to identify and assist victims of trafficking offered for
frontline officers from social services, law enforcement,
immigration, and health care agencies.

(SBU) In June 2006, the local NGO Girl Child Network launched
an anti-trafficking prevention and protection project aimed
at young girls. During the year, Girl Child Network held two
anti-trafficking workshops, which included local authorities.

-- J. (SBU) The government does cooperate with other
governments in the investigation and prosecution of
trafficking cases. The government has seconded ZRP officers
to the Interpol NCB Zimbabwe office--two of which work on the
Human Trafficking Desk. During the year, the Interpol NCB
Zimbabwe office cooperated on international trafficking
investigations with Interpol NCB offices in Canada, Malawi,
South Africa, United Kingdom and Zambia.

(SBU) Additionally, the media reported that the government
signed a letter of intent with the Government of Indonesia in
August 2006 that includes an agreement to fight the
prevalence of trafficking of women and children. There are
no reports of any meaningful activities resulting from this
agreement.

-- K. (SBU) There were no reports of extraditions or requests
of extradition from Zimbabwe to other countries. There were
reports in February that two Zimbabweans were arrested in the
United Kingdom for what may prove to be trafficking; however,
there is no information that the Zimbabwean Government has
requested extradition of the accused. The government has
extradition treaties with countries in the region.

-- L. (SBU) There is no evidence of government involvement in
or tolerance of trafficking, on a local or institutional
level.

-- M. (SBU) Not applicable per response to question L above.

-- N. (SBU) There is no known child sex tourism problem. The
country's sexual crimes laws do have extraterritorial
coverage. There are no reports of any prosecutions or
convictions under the extraterritorial provisions.

-- O. (SBU) The government ratified ILO Convention 182 on
December 11, 2000. The government ratified ILO Conventions
29 and 105 on August 27, 1998. Parliament ratified the UN
Convention Against Transnational Organized Crime on March 30,
2006 and it is now with the Ministry of Home Affairs pending
the formal deposit of instruments of ratification at the UN.
According to the legal counsel to Parliament, the legislative
body plans to take the necessary steps to ratify the UN
protocol on trafficking and incorporate its provisions in to
domestic law during 2007. The government has not signed the
Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the
Child on the sale of children.

------------------------------------

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PROTECTION AND ASSISTANCE TO VICTIMS
------------------------------------

-- A. (SBU) The government has shown an increasing interest
in assisting victims. Although the government does not have
sufficient resources to provide for the protection of victims
itself in most cases, it cooperates with international
organizations and NGOs that provide such services. The ZRP
and Department of Immigration have a mechanism for referring
victims of trafficking to victim support. An IOM contact
reported that law enforcement, immigration and social welfare
officials usually refer potential victims in an expeditious
manner.

(SBU) The Ministry of Public Service, Labor and Social
Welfare directly operates programs in 3 districts to provide
orphans and vulnerable children with basic food assistance,
support for school fees, counseling for victimizes children,
HIV/AIDS education and medical assistance. Additionally,
UNICEF announced in February that it had received commitments
for over $70 million over five years from international
donors to support NAP for OVC programs.

(SBU) The Department of Social Welfare (under The Ministry of
Public Service, Labor and Social Welfare) works closely with
IOM and Save the Children Norway to provide protection for
children deported from South Africa received at the IOM
Reception Center in Beitbridge, Zimbabwe. Additionally, the
district council of Beitbridge has a dedicated child
protection officer and convenes a child protection committee.

-- B. (SBU) The government cooperated in the establishment
the IOM Reception Center for Zimbabweans deported from South
Africa, which opened in May 2006. The Department of
Immigration uses a building at the IOM Reception Center for
processing deportees and requires that all deportees receive
an IOM briefing on safe migration.

-- C. (SBU) Whenever any government official, usually police
or immigration, becomes aware of potential trafficking
victims, the official alerts the VFU of the ZRP, which then
alerts one of the international organizations or NGOs
(usually IOM, Save the Children Norway or Girl Child Network)
to provide victim assistance services. Some victims come to
attention of the international organizations or NGOs first,
in which case VFU is alerted. VFU officers interview the
victim and refer him or her to shelter, health care,
counseling, and reintegration services arranged and paid for
by IOM or an NGO. VFU and IOM officers also may jointly
interview victims when appropriate.

(SBU) During the year, the Zimbabwean Embassy in South Africa
referred 2 trafficking victims to IOM's Southern Africa
Counter-Trafficking Program (SACTAP).

-- D. (SBU) The government generally respects the rights of
trafficking victims and usually refers a potential victim to
IOM or an NGO in an expeditious manner.

-- E. (SBU) The government encourages victims to assist in
the investigation and prosecution of traffickers. However,
the lack of resources impedes the ability of the police to
pursue many cases. Foreign victims of trafficking are
offered relief from deportation while they receive victim
support services and while their cases are being
investigated. The Chief of Immigration may offer a temporary
employment permit at his discretion.

-- F. (SBU) The government refers victims to international
organizations and NGOs to provide all forms of victim
assistance, including shelter, medical and psycho/social
care, rehabilitation and reintegration.

-- G. (SBU) The government does not provide its own
specialized training, but did take advantage of
anti-trafficking seminars and training offered by IOM and
NGOs. During the year, IOM held one seminar on trafficking

HARARE 00000170 009 OF 010


for senior government officials and four training sessions on
how to identify and assist victims of trafficking offered for
frontline officers from social services, law enforcement,
immigration, and health care agencies. During the year, Girl
Child Network project held two anti-trafficking workshops,
which included local authorities.

-- H. (SBU) The government does not have the resources to
provide protection, medical aid, shelter, or financial help
to repatriated nationals who are victims of trafficking but
refers such cases to IOM for such assistance.

-- I. (SBU) The government generally has a good working
relationship with international organizations and NGOs on
trafficking-related issues. IOM, UNICEF, Save the Children
Norway and Save the Children UK regularly meet with
government officials to discuss children's issues. IOM also
regularly meets with Zimbabwean and South African government
officials to discuss immigration issues, including
trafficking. IOM, Save the Children Norway and Girl Child
Network have reported that the government has referred
numerous trafficking victims for assistance and demonstrated
an interest in combating trafficking. The government also
cooperates with efforts by UNICEF and a local NGO, Streets
Ahead, to provide counseling and reunification services for
street children referred to orphanages or juvenile detention
centers.

(SBU) IOM's SACTAP program operates in six countries in the
SADC region, including Zimbabwe. The SACTAP program includes
victim assistance and rehabilitation, institutional capacity
building, research and data collection, and information and
awareness raising activities. IOM Zimbabwe also runs a
hotline that receives inquiries and reports from the public
on migration related issues and is planning to establish a
second hotline this year dedicated to trafficking.

(SBU) IOM, UNICEF, Save the Children Norway, and Save the
Children UK work with trafficking victims through local NGO
partners. NGOs include Connect (training for counselors of
abuse victims), Corridors of Hope (HIV/AIDs education and
counseling), Childline (children's crisis hotline), Streets
Ahead (counseling and shelter for children), Girl Child
Network (shelter, skills building, and counseling for abused
girls), Musasa Project (shelter and counseling for domestic
abuse and trafficking victims), and The Center (counseling
for HIV/AIDS patients).

(SBU) Girl Child Network and Save the Children Norway report
that the relationship with local authorities varies by
location. In some areas, officials are difficult to work
with because they do not understand trafficking or deny any
problem exists. In other areas, officials are very
cooperative and eager to receive training and other
assistance in building capacity. IOM and UNICEF report
generally good cooperation from the government.

(SBU) Senior government officials demonstrate the political
will necessary to comprehensively address the trafficking
problem; however, the lack of funding remains a serious
impediment to enacting anti-trafficking programs. Zimbabwe
is in the seventh year of steep economic decline and the
government lacks funding to provide even the most basic
public services. There is an estimated 80 percent
unemployment in the formal sector. According to officil
figures, annual inflation is slightly more tha 1,500 percent
(many experts put inflation at mor than twice that amount).
Labor unrest is growin, including in the police and military
ranks. Te worsening economic conditions are driving a
masive exodus out of the country and illegal migratin is on
the rise.

(SBU) The economic challenges are particular difficulties at
the operational level. During the year, the media frequently
reported on law enforcement's shortage of functioning
vehicles, equipment and fuel. The Criminal Investigative
Department (CID) of the ZRP told us that the unit does not

HARARE 00000170 010 OF 010


have sufficient funds to pay for basic undercover work or
confidential informants. The VFU of the ZRP reported that it

SIPDIS
needs additional human resources and facilities throughout
the country, especially in border towns.

-------------------
Contact Information
-------------------

2. (U) Post point of contact for trafficking in persons is
Scott C. Higgins; office phone 263-4-250-593, extension 321;
fax 263-4-253-000; e-mail HigginsSC@state.gov. The estimated
hours spent per officer in preparation of this report are as
follows: poloff 40 hours, polasst 5 hours, polchief 3 hours,
DCM 1 hour review, AMB 1 hour review.
DELL

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