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Cablegate: Seventh Annual Trafficking in Persons (Tip) Report- Mexico (Pa

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RR RUEHCD RUEHGD RUEHHO RUEHMC RUEHNG RUEHNL RUEHRD RUEHRS RUEHTM
DE RUEHME #1201/01 0672220
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
R 082220Z MAR 07
FM AMEMBASSY MEXICO
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC 5730
INFO RUEHXC/ALL US CONSULATES IN MEXICO COLLECTIVE

UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 11 MEXICO 001201

SIPDIS

SENSITIVE

SIPDIS

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: KCRM ELAB KFRD KWMN MX PHUM PREF SMIG
SUBJECT: SEVENTH ANNUAL TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS (TIP) REPORT- MEXICO (PA

REF: A. 06 STATE 202745 B. 06 MEXICO 6568 C. 06 MEXICO 3423


NOTE: This is the second part of a three part cable. End note.

INVESTIGATION AND PROSECUTION OF TRAFFICKERS
--------------------------------------------

17. (SBU) QUESTION A. Does the country have a law
specifically prohibiting trafficking in persons--both for
sexual and non-sexual purposes (e.g. forced labor)? If so,
please specifically cite the name of the law and its date of
enactment. Does the law(s) cover both internal and external
(transnational) forms of trafficking? If not, under what
other laws can traffickers be prosecuted? For example, are
there laws against slavery or the exploitation of
prostitution by means of force, fraud or coercion? Are
these other laws being used in trafficking cases? Are these
laws, taken together, adequate to cover the full scope of
trafficking in persons? Please provide a full inventory of
trafficking laws, including non-criminal statutes that allow
for civil penalties against alleged trafficking crimes,
(e.g., civil forfeiture laws and laws against illegal debt.

POST RESPONSE: In the past year, three states passed
anti-trafficking laws: Michoacan (June 2006), Chihuahua
(November 2006) and Guerrero (January 2007). The Chihuahua
and Guerrero laws are particularly comprehensive anti-TIP
laws that draw directly from the Palermo Protocol. State laws
play a particularly important role in Mexico, where the
federal and state jurisdiction is clearly delineated. Whereas
the federal authorities can investigate cases of organized
crime, state authorities are likely to prosecute
trafficking-related crimes in which there is allegedly no
involvement of organized crime. While a federal trafficking
law is critical, state legislation will broaden the
government's capability, in practice, to prosecute
trafficking at a local level.

On 20 February 2007, the Senate passed reforms to the law
against organized crime and corresponding changes to the
penal code to strengthen the penalties against the
exploitation of minors. The bill awaits the signature of the
president. The reforms incur penalties of one to five years
for those who buy child pornography; 15 years in prison for
prostituting minors; eight to 15 years for employing the
forced labor of minors; and four to nine years for exploiting
minors by forcing them to beg.

Although the senate passed federal anti-trafficking
legislation in December 2005, it has stalled in the lower
chamber of congress. Therefore, Mexico must rely on existing
federal and state criminal statutes to prosecute trafficking
cases; however, even outside of the three states listed
above, the government does have the legal instruments
necessary to combat many aspects of both internal and
external trafficking.

Mexico's General Population Law, Article 138, makes it a
federal crime to traffic in undocumented aliens. The law
provides that a term of imprisonment shall be imposed on a
person who for himself or another, for the purpose of
trafficking, attempts to transport or transports or
represents that he will transport, Mexicans or foreigners to
a foreign country without proper documentation, or introduces
foreigners into Mexico without proper documentation.

Article 365 of the Mexican Penal Code, makes it a federal
crime to use physical violence, moral suasion, trick or
intimidation or any other means, for oneself or another, to
get services or work without payment. It also punishes any
arrangement which deprives a person of liberty, or puts him
or her in conditions of servitude.

Article 366 makes it a crime to transport a minor (under 16
years of age) outside the country for financial benefit and
imposes a penalty of three to ten years.

Article 2 of the Federal Law Against Organized Crime
prohibits three or more people from committing repeated
violations of Article 366 of the Penal Code and 138 of the
General Population Law. This provision allows use of
techniques for organized crime investigations and
prosecutions, such as wiretapping; seizure and forfeiture of
proceeds; and preventive detention. The time period under
the statute of limitations is doubled.

Article 201 of the Mexican Penal Code punishes those who
commit the crime of corruption of minors (less than 18 years
old). The crime includes those who oblige minors to commit
acts of sexual exhibitionism, sexual acts or prostitution. It

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also criminalizes the procurement of minors to induce them to
commit the acts described above, for the purpose of making
films and videos for hard copy or for electronic distribution.

The Constitution of the United Mexican States bans slavery
and prohibits forced labor, which includes forced or bonded
labor by children. The minimum legal age to work is 14 years
of age.

States, where most trafficking-related crimes are prosecuted,
also have varying laws. PFP provided the following inventory
of trafficking-related crimes listed by state. NOTE: State
laws criminalizing "trafficking in persons" do exist, but
they are not nearly comprehensive Q) or relevant Q) to meet
the definition of the Palermo Protocol. However, the new
Michoacan, Chihuahua and Guerrero laws are comprehensive,
especially the latter two. End note.

Aguascalientes
-- sexual harassment; articles 120-121; penalty of six months
to one year;
-- rape and sexual abuse; articles 124-128; penalty of eight
months to 14 years;
-- corruption of minors; articles 191-192; penalty of two to
six years;
-- pimping; article 193; penalty of two to eight years;
-- smuggling of minors; article 133; penalty of four to 10
years;
-- illegal deprivation of liberty; articles 136-137; penalty
of six months to three years;

Baja California Norte
-- offense to public morality; article 268; penalty of one
year to seven years;
-- corruption of minors and disabled; article 261; penalty of
one to five years;
-- pimping; articles 265-267; penalty of one to ten years;
-- sexual abuse; articles 180-181; penalty of two to eight
years;
-- rape; articles 176-179; penalty of four to 12 years;
-- smuggling of minors; article 238; penalty of four to 12
years;

Baja California Sur
-- offense to public morality; article 255; penalty of six
months to five years;
-- corruption of minors and disabled and child pornography;
article 256-259; penalty of five to ten years;
-- pimping and trafficking in persons; article 206-263;
penalty of two to eight years;
-- rape; articles 185-189; penalty of five to 10 years;
-- smuggling of minors; article 254; penalty of two to 10
years;

Campeche
-- offense to public morality; article 175; penalty of six
months to five years;
-- corruption of minors; article 176-179; penalty of three
months to eight years;
-- pimping; articles 180-182; penalty of six months to eight
years;
-- attempt upon virtue or rape; article 228-235; penalty of
three to eight years;

Chiapas
-- offense to public morality or good customs; instigation of
prostitution; article 207; penalty of one year to five years;
-- corruption of minors and disabled; article 208-210;
penalty of two to five years;
-- pimping; articles 211-214; penalty of four to eight years;
-- sexual abuse; articles 180-181; penalty of two to eight
years;
-- rape; articles 176-179; penalty of four to 12 years;
-- sexual harassment, sexual abuse, rape; article 153-158;
penalty of six to 14 years;

Chihuahua
-- trafficking in persons; article 198-200; penalty of six to
18 years;
-- offense to public morality; article 174; penalty of three
months to three years;
-- crimes against the correct upbringing of a minor and
integral protection the disabled; art. 170-180; one year to
six years;
-- pimping; articles 175-176; penalty of three to eight years;
-- rape; articles 239-241; penalty of six to 20 years;
-- sexual abuse; articles 245-246; penalty of six months to
two years;
-- smuggling of minors and disabled; article 231; penalty of
two to nine years;


MEXICO 00001201 003 OF 011


Coahuila
-- offense to public morality; articles 298-299; penalty of
three days to four years;
-- pimping and trafficking of persons; articles 306-308;
penalty of six months to 14 years;

Colima
-- offense to public morality; article 154; penalty of six
months to three years;
-- corruption of minors; articles 155-157; penalty of one to
six years;
-- pimping; articles 158-161; penalty of one to five years;
-- rape; articles 206-210; penalty of two to 10 years;
-- dishonest abuses; articles 214-216; penalty of three
months to three years;

Federal District
-- corruption of minors and the disabled; articles 183-186;
penalty of six to ten years;
-- child pornography; articles 187-188; penalty of six to 14
years;
-- pimping, including deprivation of liberty for sexual
purposes; articles 158-161; penalty of one to five years;
-- labor exploitation of minors or persons with mental or
physical disabilities; article 190; penalty of two to six
years;
-- sexual abuse; articles 176-178; penalty of two to seven
years;
-- assisted procreation, artificial insemination, genetical
manipulation; articles 149-153; penalty of three to 15 years;

Durango
-- offense to public morality; article 289; penalty of six
months to five years;
-- corruption of minors and disabled; articles 290-293;
penalty of two to eight years;
-- pimping; articles 297-299; penalty of three to eight years;
-- child pornography; articles 294-296; penalty of six to 14
years;
-- dishonest abuses; articles 386-387; penalty of one to
three years;
-- rape; articles 392-398; penalty of 10 to 15 years;

State of Mexico
-- offense to public morality; article 204; penalty of two to
five years;
-- corruption of minors; articles 205-208; penalty of six
months to five years;
-- pimping and trafficking in persons; articles 209-210;
penalty of four to nine years;
-- rape; articles 273-274; penalty of five to 11 years;

Guanajuato
-- smuggling of minors; article 220; penalty of four to 10
years;
-- corruption of minors and disabled, sexual exploitation;
articles 236-239; penalty of six to 15 years;
-- pimping and prostitution of minors; article 240; penalty
of four to eight years;
-- rape; articles 180-184; penalty of four to eight years;

Guerrero
-- trafficking in persons; article 133; penalty of six to 18
years;
-- pimping; article 218; penalty of two to nine years;
-- offense to public morality; articles 216-217; penalty of
three to eight years;
-- crimes against sexual freedom; articles 139-141; penalty
of eight to 16 years;
-- dishonest abuses; articles 143-144; penalty of six months
to seven years;
-- sexual exploitation ; articles 188-189; penalty of two to
six years;

Hidalgo
-- rape; articles 179-181; penalty of five to 12 years;
-- undesired pregnancy through clinical means; articles 182;
penalty of two to six years;
-- lewd acts; articles 183-184; penalty of six months to two
years;
-- rape; articles 158-161; penalty of one to five years;
-- sexual abuse; articles 188-189; penalty of two to seven
years;

Jalisco
-- offense to public morality or good customs, instigation of
prostitution; article 135; penalty of three months to two
years;
-- corruption of minors and child pornography; articles
136-138; penalty of three to 15 years;
-- pimping; articles 139-141; penalty of four to nine years;

MEXICO 00001201 004 OF 011


-- rape; article 194; penalty of 10 to 18 years;

Michoacan
-- trafficking in persons; articles 168; penalty of eight to
14 years;
-- offense to public morality; articles 162-163; penalty of
three months to two years;
-- corruption of minors; articles 164-168; penalty of two to
six years;
-- pimping; articles 167; penalty of two to eight years;
-- rape; articles 240-242; penalty of 10 to 20 years;
-- smuggling in persons and kidnapping; articles 229-232;
penalty of 15 to 40 years;
-- pimping, corruption of minors, sexual tourism and child
pornography; penalty of up to 12 years

Morelos
-- offense to public morality; article 213; penalty of six
months to three years;
-- corruption of minors and the disabled; article 213;
penalty of two to eight years;
-- corruption of minors; article 211-212; penalty of two to
six years;
-- pimping and trafficking in persons; article 213; penalty
of six months to three years;
-- sexual abuse and rape; articles 161-162; penalty of two to
five years;
-- rape; articles 152-156; penalty of 20 to 25 years;

Nayarit
-- offense to public morality or good customs, instigation of
prostitution; articles 198-199; penalty of three months to
two years;
-- corruption of minors; articles 200-202; penalty of one to
five years;
-- pimping; articles 203-206; penalty of one to six years;
-- exploitation of minors or the infirmed; articles 252;
penalty of one to three years;
-- attempt on virtue; articles 255-257; penalty of three
months to one year;
-- rape; articles 260-261; penalty of ten to 30 years;
-- abduction and smuggling of infants; article 264-265;
penalty of one to six years;

Nuevo Leon
-- offense to public morality or good customs; article 195;
penalty of one to five years;
-- corruption of minors or persons against their will, child
pornograpy; articles 196-201; penalty of four to nine years;
-- pimping; articles 202-204; penalty of six to 10 years;
-- rape; articles 265-271; penalty of six to 12 years;
-- pornography of a person against his/her will; article 271;
penalty of six months to two years;

Puebla
-- offense to public morality; article 194; penalty of thirty
days to three years;
-- corruption of minors and of the disabled; articles
217-225; penalty of eight to 14 years;
-- pimping; articles 226-228; penalty of six months to eight
years;
-- attacks on virtue; articles 260-263; penalty of one to
five years;
-- rape; articles 267-272; penalty of six to 20 years;

Queretaro
-- corruption and exploitation of minors and of the disabled;
articles 236-237; penalty of six months to four years;
-- pimping; articles 238; penalty of six months to eight
years;
-- trafficking in persons; articles 239; penalty of six
months to eight years;
-- pornography with minors or the disabled; article 239;
penalty of two to 10 years;
-- rape; articles 160-164; penalty of three to ten years;
-- dishonest abuses; articles 165-166; penalty of two to four
years;

Quintana Roo
-- corruption of minors; articles 191-192; penalty of six
months to five years;
-- pimping; article 193; penalty of six months to six years;
-- trafficking in persons; articles 194; penalty of six
months to five years;
-- smuggling of minors; article 172; penalty of two to nine
years;
-- rape; articles 127-128; penalty of six to 20 years;
-- dishonest abuses; article 129; penalty of two to four
years;

San Luis Potosi

MEXICO 00001201 005 OF 011


-- offense to public morality or good customs; article 185;
penalty of six months to two years;
-- pimping and trafficking in persons; article 186-188;
penalty of three to eight years;
-- corruption of minors; articles 180-184; penalty of two to
eight years;
-- rape; articles 150-156; penalty of eight to sixteen years;
-- smuggling of minors; article 172; penalty of eight to 40
years;

Sinaloa
-- corruption and exploitation of minors and of the disabled;
articles 273-274; penalty of four to eight years;
-- pimping; article 275; penalty of six months to eight years;
-- trafficking in persons; articles 276; penalty of six
months to eight years;
-- smuggling of minors; article 243; penalty of two to 10
years;
-- rape; articles 179-181; penalty of six to 15 years;

Sonora
-- corruption and exploitation of minors and of the disabled;
articles 273-274; penalty of four to eight years;
-- pimping; article 275; penalty of six months to eight years;
-- trafficking in persons; articles 276; penalty of six
months to eight years;
-- smuggling of minors; article 243; penalty of two to 10
years;
-- rape; articles 179-181; penalty of six to 15 years;

Tabasco
-- pimping and trafficking in persons; article 327-358;
penalty of two to six years;
-- corruption of minors and of the disabled; articles
329-334; penalty of three to 10 years;
-- child pornography; articles 334; penalty of six to 14
years;
-- rape; articles 148-152; penalty of eight to 14 years;

Tamaulipas
-- offense to public morality, instigation of prostitution;
article 190-191; penalty of one to three years;
-- corruption of minors and of the disabled, child
pornography and sexual prostitution of minors and of the
disabled; articles 192-198; penalty of three to eight years;
-- pimping; articles 199-201; penalty of two to nine years;
-- rape; articles 273-275; penalty of 10 to 15 years;

Tlaxcala
-- offense to public morality, instigation of prostitution;
article 164-165; penalty of three months to two years;
-- pimping; articles 170-173; penalty of six months to eight
years;
-- rape; articles 221-226; penalty of six to eight years;

Veracruz
-- offense to public morality; article 228-223; penalty of
six months to one year;
-- rape; articles 152-155; penalty of six to eight years;

Yucatan
-- offense to public morality or good customs; article
164-165; penalty of six months to five years;
-- corruption of minors and of the disabled, trafficking of
minors and child pornograpy; articles 208-213; penalty of
five to ten years;
-- pimping and trafficking in persons; articles 214-216;
penalty of one to seven years;

Zacatecas
-- offense to public morality or good customs, instigation of
prostitution; article 121; penalty of three to six months
-- corruption of minors; articles 124-18; penalty of six
months to two years;
-- pimping; article 193; penalty of six to ten years;
-- rape; articles 194; penalty of five to 20 years.

18. (SBU) QUESTION B. What are the penalties for trafficking
people for sexual exploitation?

POST RESPONSE: Article 138 (trafficking undocumented aliens)
provides a term of 6 to 12 years imprisonment. Penalties
increase by half if the crime is committed with minors or
under conditions which will put their health or life in
danger.

Corruption of minors is punished with sentences of five to
ten years under Article 201; if the conduct is repeated, the
sentence is seven to 12 years. Under Article 201 anyone who
procures minors for films, video or other pornographic
materials may be sentenced from five to ten years. Those who

MEXICO 00001201 006 OF 011


film, photograph, print or distribute pornographic materials
involving minors are subject to sentences of ten to 12 years.
One who directs or manages a child pornography enterprise can
receive a sentence of eight to 12 years imprisonment.

Also please see paragraph 17.

19. (SBU) QUESTION C. Punishment of labor trafficking
offenses: what are the prescribed and imposed penalties for
trafficking for labor exploitation, such as forced or bonded
labor and involuntary servitude? Do the government's laws
provide for criminal punishment -- i.e. jail time -- for
labor recruiters in labor source countries who engage in
recruitment of laborers using knowingly fraudulent or
deceptive offers that result in workers being exploited in
the destination country? For employers or labor agents in
labor destination countries who confiscate workers' passports
or travel documents, switch contracts without the worker's
consent as a means to keep the worker in a state of service,
or withhold payment of salaries as means of keeping the
worker in a state of service? If law(s) prescribe criminal
punishments for these offenses, what are the actual
punishments imposed on persons convicted of these offenses?

POST RESPONSE: For trafficking undocumented aliens, please
see paragraph 18.

The penalty for violation of Article 365 (labor exploitation)
is three days to one year, but increases to one to five
years, if the plan is to carry out a sexual act. The penalty
increases to 20 to 40 years, if Article 365 is violated with
a child less than 16 years old, or a victim more than 60
years old, or if the person is mentally or physically
handicapped. The penalty increases to 25 to 50 years if the
minor is deprived of liberty with the intent to send him or
her out of the country, with the intent of obtaining payment
for the sale or delivery of the minor. There are additional
penalties if the violation also involves a permanent or
presumptively incurable disease or loss of sexual function.

20. (SBU) QUESTION D. What are the prescribed penalties for
rape or forcible sexual assault? How do they compare to the
prescribed and imposed penalties for crimes of trafficking
for commercial sexual exploitation?

POST RESPONSE: Each of Mexico's 31 states, plus Mexico City,
has their own penal codes and the penalties vary. In Mexico
City, the penalty for rape of a child less than twelve years
old is punishable by two to five years imprisonment; another
50 percent of the sentence is added if violence was used.
When the victim is between 12 and 18 years old, rape is
punishable by three months to four years in prison. The
penalty for rape of an adult woman is six months to four
years; if violence is used in the process, an additional 50
percent of the sentence may be added to it. Use of force in
a rape against a member of either sex is punishable by eight
to 14 years in prison.

According to federal law, child prostitution and any practice
that affects a child's psychosocial development is a felony
under Mexican law. The Federal Penal Code and the Penal
Proceedings Code cover crimes involving children or
adolescents in pornography or prostitution. The laws cover
child pornography, prostitution of minors, and corruption of
minors or mentally disabled persons. They specify penalties
for perpetrators according to the seriousness of the crime.

21. (SBU) QUESTION E. Is prostitution legalized or
decriminalized? Specifically, are the activities of the
prostitute criminalized? Are the activities of the brothel
owner/operator, clients, pimps, and enforcers criminalized?
Are these laws enforced? If prostitution is legal and
regulated, what is the legal minimum age for this activity?
Note that in many countries with federalist systems,
prostitution laws may be covered by state, local, and
provincial authorities.

POST RESPONSE: Prostitution is legal in Mexico, but only for
adults (those 18 years of age and older) that are not being
pimped. The existing laws that do pertain to prostitution
focus on threats to public health, moral corruption and
pimping. The Mexican criminal code contains penalties for
corruption of minors; for induced or forced prostitution and
maintaining brothels; for employment of minors in bars and
other centers of vice; and for the procurement, inducement or
concealment of prostitution. Flagrant prostitution is
subject to a penalty of six months to five years in prison.
Both pimping and prostitution are practiced widely and
generally without arrest or prosecution.

22. (SBU) QUESTION F. Has the government prosecuted any cases

MEXICO 00001201 007 OF 011


against traffickers? If so, provide numbers of
investigations, prosecutions, convictions, and sentences,
including details on plea bargains and fines, if relevant and
available. Does the government in a labor source country
criminally prosecute labor recruiters who recruit laborers
using knowingly fraudulent or deceptive offers or impose on
recruited laborers inappropriately high or illegal fees or
commissions that create a debt bondage condition for the
laborer? Does the government in a labor destination country
criminally prosecute employers or labor agents who confiscate
workers' passports/travel documents, switch contracts or
terms of employment without the worker's consent, use
physical or sexual abuse or the threat of such abuse to keep
workers in a state of service, or withhold payment of
salaries as a means to keep workers in a state of service?
Are the traffickers serving the time sentenced: if not, why
not? Please indicate whether the government can provide this
information, and if not, why not? (Note: complete answers to
this section are essential. End note)

POST RESPONSE: NOTE: The names and details of ongoing
investigations are not/not for public disclosure. End Note.

As the lead agency on trafficking, the PFP has reported on
state investigations and prosecutions, as well as on the
investigations that PFP is undertaking themselves, often in
collaboration with local police and/or USG. Since March 2006,
the PFP has pursued:

-- at least 10 trafficking cases;
-- 63 rescues of suspected victims of sexual exploitation;
(NOTE: While authorities attempted to rescue individuals it
presumes to be trafficking victims, many of those rescued
were subsequently proven not to be trafficking victims or
have not yet been verified as trafficking victims;
investigations are ongoing. End note.)
-- 61 rescues of victims of labor exploitation; (NOTE: The
working conditions of the plant from which the 61 were
rescued suggest that many could be trafficking victims, but
it is not clear whether the authorities verified that they
were trafficking victims. End note.)
-- the arrest of one pedophile who may be involved in a
trafficking case;
-- the sentencing of two traffickers;
-- the extradition of one trafficker to the U.S.;
-- the dismantling of 59 Internet pages for child
pornography.

The PFP reported that, from January through November of 2006,
Mexican authorities began criminal proceedings for 1,044
cases; arrested 202 suspects; and imposed five sentences. PFP
noted that the statistics are significantly different - and
reduced - from those of 2005 (1,336 cases opened and
sentences imposed in 531 cases) because of a more
discriminate process to identify trafficking cases. We cannot
verify all of these cases to be trafficking-related, and many
are likely not trafficking, but it is also likely that the
statistics are incomplete.

Post did review several ongoing GOM cases, and their details
are as follows:

-- Since January 2006, when the GOM received information
about a U.S. citizen and a suspected pedophile living in a
border state, the state authorities have been unable to
obtain sworn statements from minors since their investigation
began. In July 2006, the state DIF interviewed some of the
alleged victims, who refused to cooperate. ICE facilitated
the services of an expert psychologist to interview the
alleged victims, who did not admit to any sexual abuse by the
US citizen. The PFP interviewed him at his residence but
found no evidence of any sexual abuse or trafficking.

-- On April 15, 2006, a US citizen was arrested in a popular
resort city for allegedly molesting minor females and
producing child pornography, charged by the state and federal
government. While the state charges were dismissed, the
federal charges of child pornography are still pending.
Police intelligence reported that the US citizen was likely a
client of a child prostitution ring. The investigation is
ongoing, and the suspect remains in prison. ICE assisted the
PFP in this case.

-- On April 28, the Mexican Attorney General's Office (PGR)
prevailed on an appeal of seven defendants involved in the
Carreto trafficking ring, including an INM officer, and
handed out sentences ranging from 19 to 27 years. The Carreto
trafficking ring involved the smuggling to New York City and
prostitution of Mexican women, who were compelled by
violence, sexual assault, threats and deception. However, six
of these defendants filed and received a legal injunction

MEXICO 00001201 008 OF 011


("amparo") and were released; a Mexican court later revoked
the injunction and issued arrest warrants; and the six remain
fugitives. A leader of the ring, Consuelo Carreto Valencia
(or Consuelo Tomasa Felix Carreto Valencia) was convicted of
organized crime and illegal smuggling, with a sentence of 25
years and 6 months and fines of 880,718.20 Mexican pesos
(approximately USD 80,500). Consuelo Carreto Valencia was
extradited to the United States on 19 January 2007 to face
charges of trafficking, among other crimes. Mexican courts
approved the rights of custody of four children to their
mothers, who were victims of the Carreto trafficking ring and
whose husbands were traffickers; a child of another
trafficking victim is in the custody of his grandmother. The
custody case is still pending for a sixth child of a
trafficking victim.

-- On July 15, 2006, the U.S. extradited Jean Succar Kuri to
Mexico. Succar Kuri, a prominent businessman, is believed to
have operated a child prostitution ring in Cancun. He fled to
the United States when faced with charges of child
prostitution, among other crimes. He remains in a Cancun jail
waiting trial.

-- On August 10, 2006, in an operation involving several
police units and a helicopter, Mexican authorities succeeded
in rescuing a trafficked 13-year old girl. An NGO, the
Coalition Against the Trafficking of Women and Children,
provided information to PFP about a girl who was abducted on
June 3, 2006, by an offer to baby sit, held against her will,
raped by her captor (a known drug trafficker), forced to
work, and reportedly prepared to be sold into prostitution.
Although an arrest warrant was issued, the suspect remains a
fugitive. NOTE: The names of NGOs working with the INM with
victim protection and assistance are not/not for public
disclosure. End Note.

-- On September 3, 2006, in response to a complaint filed by
a local official in Puerto Vallarta, the PFP and local police
rescued a minor girl outside an internet cafQ, two blocks
from the residence of Alfonso Franco, 39 years old, with whom
she was living. Because the girl's father neither filed a
complaint nor cooperated with local police, the Mexican
authorities could not press charges against Franco.
Intelligence reported that the father may have allowed his
daughter to live with Franco in return for monetary
compensation. The girl now remains in the care of her father.

-- On September 19, 2006, INM inspected the manufacturing
plant KBL, in Guanajuato, in cooperation with PFP, CISEN, PGR
and an NGO, Sin Fronteras. The authorities discovered 61
Chinese nationals who reported that they worked more than 14
hours per day, were refused permission to leave the location
of the plant, and whose legal paperwork (e.g. visas) were in
the possession of the company. The migratory status of the
workers was legal, but their working conditions were
allegedly illegal. The Chinese nationals returned to China,
and KBL is reportedly closing its operations in Mexico. Prior
to the inspection, two Chinese migrants were identified as
trafficking victims by CNDH, and were granted humanitarian
visas by INM. NOTE: The names of NGOs working with the
authorities on victim protection and assistance are not/not
for public disclosure. End Note.

-- In September of 2006, two minors were trafficked from
their home town in El Salvador to Tapachula, Chiapas, by the
members of the Mara Salvatrucha. The gang reportedly intended
to transport the victims to the United States to be forced
into prostitution. In the meantime, they were forced to have
sex with members of the gang. The victims filed complaints
and the local authorities have arrested the gang members. The
victims are currently being cared for in a shelter. The
investigation is ongoing.

-- On October 3, 2006, through collaboration between the PFP
and an NGO, Bilateral Security Corridor Coalition, PFP with
PGR and DIF conducted on operation on an orphanage, in
Ensenada, Baja California, in which the children were
suspected of being sexually abused and exploited. All 51
children were interviewed and it was determined that some
children were sexually abused by one of the caretakers. The
state Secretary of Health has taken custody of the orphanage.
However, 19 of children are now missing. Police intelligence
suggests that this is a trafficking operation. A prosecution
case was initiated and evidence continues to be collected.
NOTE: The names of NGOs working with authorities on victim
protection and assistance are not/not for public disclosure.
End Note.

-- On 11 February 2007, following a several week
investigation in a border city of a cross-border prostitution
ring, involving minors, the local police arrested the ring

MEXICO 00001201 009 OF 011


leader, a US citizen, as well as the ring's secretary and
three prostitutes. The police also raided offices linked to
the ring, outfitted with computers, multiple phone lines and
photographic catalogues of prostitutes. The ring is
reportedly based in the U.S., with US citizen clients who are
serviced by Mexican prostitutes. The ring featured an
Internet catalogue and included about 35 prostitutes, all
Mexican nationals. The FBI and local authorities collaborated
in the area of intelligence.

-- ICE has been working with GOM on an operation that is
suspected of trafficking women from Southeastern Europe and
South America to force them to work at night clubs for
Q&table dancingQ8 and perhaps prostitution, in Monterrey. A
GOM undercover agent is providing intelligence on the case,
specifically on women recently arrived from Brazil and
Hungary. ICE is working with GOM to arrange meetings with
recruiters in Europe.

-- INM provided information to PFP on possible TIP victims
arrested during an INM operation in Mexico City. The case
involves women prostituted through a website,
www.divas.com.mx. Until a recent breakthrough, Mexican
authorities had identified eight women prostituted (seven
Argentineans and one Hungarian), the chief of the operations,
two recruiters (Argentinean), and the financing operation
(run by the chief's brother). PFP identified more than five
TIP victims/witnesses who gave sworn statements. While a
Mexican court was reviewing the case to determine whether
arrest warrants should be issued, one of the alleged
traffickers - Antonio Martinez - was arrested by
authorities in late February 2007 when caught prostituting
nine women. At least one of the women, a twenty-one year old
Argentinean, was deceived to travel to Mexico by a job offer,
forced into prostitution, held against her will and
threatened with violence. Mexican authorities have search
warrants for two properties belonging to Martinez.

-- GOM and ICE have cooperated on a trafficking case
involving a criminal family network whose members lure young
women, from various parts of Mexico, with the promise of
marriage and/or employment. Once the women accept the offer,
the criminal network transports the women to Puebla or
Tenancingo to work as domestic servants, perhaps for a couple
months. Following, the women are transported to Mexico City
or Tijuana and forced into prostitution. Subsequently, the
women may be transported to New Jersey, New York, Maryland or
Virginia where they are prostituted again. ICE/Newark
initiated the case and executed search and arrest warrants;
the GOM is expected to follow with its own search and arrest
warrants. The GOM has already traveled to the US to take
statements from female minor victims and conducted a
comprehensive investigation in Mexico.

-- With information from an NGO, the GOM has an investigation
pending on the activities of several "table dance"
establishments in Cancun that recruit women, and minors, to
work as dancers, but upon their employment are raped by a
manager, forced into prostitution and kept against their
will. A victim was located in the U.S. and provided a
statement. Confidential sources, who have spoken with the
victims, also corroborated the alleged trafficking operation.

23. (SBU) QUESTION G. Is there any information or reports of
who is behind the trafficking? For example, are the
traffickers freelance operators, small crime groups, and/or
large international organized crime syndicates? Are
employment, travel, and tourism agencies or marriage brokers
fronting for traffickers or crime groups to traffic
individuals? Are government officials involved? Are there
any reports of where profits from trafficking in persons are
being channeled? (e.g. armed groups, terrorist
organizations, judges, banks, etc.)

POST RESPONSE: Anecdotal evidence suggests that trafficking
in Mexico involves all types of individuals and groups -
including freelance operators, family networks, small crime
groups, and large international organized crime syndicates
(see paragraph 6). Last year, the IOM believed that there
were 135 criminal trafficking networks in Mexico, and the
CISEN said there were 126 gangs involved in trafficking on
the southern border. Alien smugglers are also frequently
involved in identifying and transporting trafficking victims.

There have been reports that some law enforcement and
migration officials - especially at the local level - have
been involved in trafficking to the extent they have been
known to accept bribes to facilitate or ignore alien
smuggling or to allow brothels and child prostitution to
exist unmolested. There have been unsubstantiated reports
of senior GOM officials being complicit in TIP.

MEXICO 00001201 010 OF 011

24. (SBU) QUESTION H. Does the government actively
investigate cases of trafficking? (again, the focus should
be on trafficking cases versus migrant smuggling cases.) Does
the government use active investigative techniques in
trafficking in persons investigations? To the extent
possible under domestic law, are techniques such as
electronic surveillance, undercover operations, and mitigated
punishment or immunity for cooperating suspects used by the
government? Does the criminal procedure code or other laws
prohibit the police from engaging in covert operations?

POST RESPONSE: The government does actively investigate
crimes related to trafficking (e.g., pimping, child
prostitution, child pornography offenses, etc), often at the
state level, using investigative techniques that include
electronic surveillance, undercover operations, and plea
bargains or immunity for cooperating suspects. Domestic law
does not prevent the police from engaging in covert
operations (see paragraph 22). In the last year, the federal
police have been significantly more assertive in
investigating trafficking cases.

25. (SBU) QUESTION I. Does the government provide any
specialized training for government officials in how to
recognize, investigate, and prosecute instances of
trafficking?

POST RESPONSE: The government, in conjunction with some NGOs
and the USG, does give specialized training to its officials
in how to recognize, investigate, and prosecute instances of
trafficking.

In August and September, ICE - with the assistance of civil
society organizations like IOM and CAT-W - provided a
40-hour training course on investigations in trafficking in
persons to 60 PFP officers, as well as a four-hour block of
training to 300 PFP officers during advanced training at the
federal police training academy. In August 2006, ICE and CIS
trained approximately 90 immigration officials in Tapachula
on trafficking in persons. The BSCC has trained more than
1500 government workers, including more than 750 police
officers. The NAS and DOJ Federal Bureau of Investigations
(DOJ-FBI) sections at post have provided training to Mexican
law enforcement officials on active investigation and
interviewing techniques.

The DIF/ILO program to Eradicate the Commercial Sexual
Exploitation of Minors (ESCI) has trained hundreds of
government officials. The ESCI program ran a two-day training
in November 2006 for working level DIF employees from 23
states.

Many other training sessions on trafficking took place around
the country, including:

-- May 29-31: INM organized TIP training for migration
officials from around the country.

-- June 28-29: INM organized training on identifying and
assisting TIP victims for migration officers at the detention
center in Iztapalapa, one of the country's three large
detention centers.

-- August 17: TIP training seminar was held in the state of
Tlaxcala (a recruiting ground for the Carreto trafficking
ring) for a range of state government officials and civil
society.

-- September 6: Secretariat of Public Security IOM organized
a training workshop for staff and the operation of the
hotline established in conjunction with the PFP
anti-trafficking media campaign.

-- September 11-14: Training workshops were held for local
officials and civil society of the northern border cities of
Ciudad Juarez and Nuevo Laredo.

-- October 12: INMUJERES organized a TIP training workshop,
particularly for addressing women migrants, in Chetumal,
Quintana Roo.

-- November 16: Queretaro State Commission on Human Rights
organized a TIP training workshop for state officials.

26. (SBU) QUESTION J. Does the government cooperate with
other governments in the investigation and prosecution of
trafficking cases? If possible, can post provide the number
of cooperative international investigations on trafficking?

POST RESPONSE: The GOM cooperates with other governments in

MEXICO 00001201 011 OF 011


the investigation and prosecution of trafficking cases.
Mexican law enforcement officials continue to work closely
with DHS-ICE on numerous trafficking investigations in Mexico
and the U.S., including cross-border trafficking cases. The
US and Mexico cooperated on nine cases listed in paragraph
22.

The ICE coordinator at Embassy Mexico City facilitated
meetings between the PFP and two NGOs, that resulted in
rescue operations of suspected trafficking victims as listed
in paragraph 22.

Most notably, the GOM extradited convicted leader of a
trafficking ring, Consuelo Carreto Valencia, to the U.S. to
face trafficking charges; and GOM received the extradition
from the US of the alleged leader of a child prostitution
ring, Jean Succar Kuri (see paragraph 22).

A US citizen who was extradited in 2005 to Mexico from
Thailand, still remains in jail in Puerto Vallarta facing
charges of corruption of minors and child prostitution, in an
alleged trafficking case.

27. (SBU) QUESTION K. Does the government extradite persons
who are charged with trafficking in other countries? If so,
can post provide the number of traffickers extradited? Does
the government extradite its own nationals charged with such
offenses? If not, is the government prohibited by law form
extraditing its own nationals? If so, is the government
doing to modify its laws to permit the extradition of its own
nationals?

POST RESPONSE: Mexican national Consuelo Carreto Valencia
received a sentence of 25 years and six months in Mexico on
trafficking-related charges; the GOM subsequently extradited
her to the United States (January 19 2007) to face charges of
trafficking, among other crimes. (See case in paragraph 22
for more information.)

28. (SBU) QUESTION L. Is there evidence of government
involvement in or tolerance of trafficking, on a local or
institutional level? If so, please explain in detail.

POST RESPONSE: See paragraph 23.

(End of Part II.)

Visit Mexico City's Classified Web Site at
http://www.state.sgov.gov/p/wha/mexicocity

GARZA

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