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Cablegate: Japanese Morning Press Highlights 04/02/07-1

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RUEHNH/AMCONSUL NAHA 2951
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UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 08 TOKYO 001420

SIPDIS

SIPDIS

DEPT FOR E, P, EB, EAP/J, EAP/P, EAP/PD, PA;
WHITE HOUSE/NSC/NEC; JUSTICE FOR STU CHEMTOB IN ANTI-TRUST DIVISION;
TREASURY/OASIA/IMI/JAPAN; DEPT PASS USTR/PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICE;
SECDEF FOR JCS-J-5/JAPAN,
DASD/ISA/EAPR/JAPAN; DEPT PASS ELECTRONICALLY TO USDA
FAS/ITP FOR SCHROETER; PACOM HONOLULU FOR PUBLIC DIPLOMACY ADVISOR;
CINCPAC FLT/PA/ COMNAVFORJAPAN/PA.

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: OIIP KMDR KPAO PGOV PINR ECON ELAB JA

SUBJECT: JAPANESE MORNING PRESS HIGHLIGHTS 04/02/07-1


1) Top headlines
2) Editorials
3) Prime Minister's daily schedule

Historical issues:
4) Interview with Rep. Mike Honda on comfort-women resolution before
the House: Japan "not sincere" on comfort-women issue; vote to come
after Abe visit
5) In unusual move, Senator Inoue sends letter to House sponsors of
comfort women resolution warning it would have bad effect on
US-Japan relations
6) Scholars, researchers, activists meet in Washington for symposium
on comfort-women
7) Screeners excise all mention from school textbooks of military
coercion, involvement in Okinawa mass suicide prior to US invasion
at end of war

Diplomatic issues:
8) Prime Minister Abe: Japan's support of launching of Iraq war was
unavoidable
9) Abe meets visiting former Secretary of State Kissinger
10) Officials deny alleged existence of secret pact between Japan,
ROK at time of normalization on disposition of disputed Takeshima
(Dokto) isles
Articles:

1) TOP HEADLINES

Asahi:
Health Ministry research team sets metabolic syndrome standards for
children

Mainichi: Tokyo Shimbun:
Ishihara ahead of Asano in Tokyo; Matsuzawa ahead in Kanagawa

Yomiuri:
MLIT to use manual to nurture career-track bureaucrats into
full-fledged officials in three to four years after entry

Nihon Keizai:
Low-cost 29-year housing loan to be put on market, possibly in
summer: Japan Housing Finance Agency to expand tie-up loan products

Sankei:
University of the Sacred Heart, Waseda University professors found
to have gotten PhDs from diploma mills; Research committee to be
established

Akahata:
First half of unified local elections: Fierce campaign battle seen
across nation

2) EDITORIALS

Asahi:
(1) New human resources bank just a way to keep amakurari in place
(2) Olympic bid: Decision time approaching

Mainichi:
(1) Equal Employment Opportunity Law: Eliminate sex discrimination
from workplace
(2) Rise in land prices: Revitalizing local economies urgent

TOKYO 00001420 002 OF 008

Yomiuri:
(1) Anonymous posting online: Lawless slander unacceptable
(2) US-ROK alliance: Will measures against North Korea remain firm?

Nihon Keizai:
(1) Market testing not going smoothly: Is the government to blame?
(2) New employees, sharpen yourselves

Sankei:
(1) Bullying subcontractors: Rampancy will undermine
competitiveness
(2) Law to prevent secret recording of movies: Harsh punishment
appropriate to prevent piracy

Tokyo Shimbun:
(1) High school history textbook screening will distort historical
facts
(2) Leather handcuffs: Make what is going on in prisons transparent

Akahata:
(1) School textbook screening: Denying coercion by military
government glorifies war

3) Prime Minister's Official Residence (Kantei)

Prime Minister's schedule, March 30

NIHON KEIZAI (Page 2) (Full)
March 31, 2007

09:02
Attended a cabinet meeting at Kantei. Later, met Health, Labor and
Welfare Minister Yanagisawa, Health Bureau Director General
Sotoguchi, and Pharmaceutical and Food Affairs Bureau Director
General Takahashi.

10:14
Met incoming UN Deputy Secretary General Kiyotaka Akasaka. Then,
posed for photos with members of the International Traditional
Artists Association.

11:00
Met Defense Vice Minister Moriya and Defense Intelligence
Headquarters Chief Mukunoki. Moriya stayed behind.

12:27
Met Chief Cabinet Secretary Shiozaki and Deputy Chief Cabinet
Secretary Matoba.

SIPDIS

12:43
Attended a special social gathering for discussion of the Fuji
Sankei Group at the Hotel Okura.

14:43
Met Matoba at the Kantei.

15:05
Met Comprehensive Science and Technology Conference member Ichiro
Kanazawa. Later attended its meeting.

16:19

TOKYO 00001420 003 OF 008


Met with former Secretary of State Kissinger.

17:28
Met Deputy Chief Cabinet Secretary Shimomura. Followed by Cabinet
Intelligence Director Mitani.

18:50
Attended a reception for upgraded Defense Ministry at the Hotel
Grand Hill Ichigaya.

19:15
Dined with the political department heads of press companies at a
Chinese restaurant at Kudan-kita.

22:06
Returned to his official residence.

Prime Minister's schedule, March 31

NIHON KEIZAI (Page 2) (Full)

April 1, 2007

Morning
Stayed at his official residence.

16:27
Attended wedding of eldest daughter of Financial Services Minister
Yamamoto at a hotel.

20:45
Arrived at his private residence in Tomigaya.

Prime Minister's schedule, April 1

NIHON KEIZAI (Page 2) (Full)

April 2, 2007

Morning
Stayed at his private residence in Tomigaya.

14:00
Went to fitness club in the Grand Hyatt Tokyo in Roppongi.

17:25
Arrived at his private residence.

4) Interview with US House of Representatives Congressman Honda:
Japan has not been sincere about comfort-women issue; We aim to
adopt House resolution after Prime Minister Abe's US visit

ASAHI (Page 2) (Full)
March 31, 2007

By Yoichi Kato in Washington

Rep. Mike Honda of the US House of Representatives (Democratic
Party, California's 15 district), who has presented a resolution
before the House calling on the Japanese government to "officially
apologize" for the wartime comfort-women issue, responded on March
29 to a telephone interview with this newspaper. Although there is

TOKYO 00001420 004 OF 008


no change in his thinking of seeking an official apology, the voting
on the resolution by the full House will not be held until after
Shinzo Abe visits the US in late April, as a courtesy to the
visiting prime minister.

The following are the main exchanges in the interview.

-- Why have you presented the resolution?

"I believe this is the third time for a resolution of this sort for
the same purpose has been presented to the House. This time, as a
result of the midterm election last fall, the leadership of the
committee switched to the Democratic Party, and it has become a lot
easier to bring the resolution to the floor."

-- Why is the resolution important for the US?

"Rather than for the US, it is more important for the victims who
were forced to serve as comfort women. The 20th Century saw a series
of wars; the 21st Century, in my view, should be a time of
reconciliation. Although many peace treaties have been signed, there
are still unresolved issues. This is one of them."

-- The Japanese government has pointed out that your resolution is
based on erroneous facts.

"I know that the Japanese embassy has been saying that there are
factual mistakes and that Japan has already apologized. But if I am
mistaken, then many other countries are mistaken, as well. I am
prepared at any time to go to Japan and debate the prime minister."

-- Is there any change in your thinking of seeking an apology from
Japan?

"I'm only thinking about the treatment that the comfort women should
have received. I know that a number of prime ministers have issued
their personal apologies and expressed their sentiments, but such
were neither recognized by the government nor the Diet."

-- Do you think the so-called Kono Statement is insufficient, even
though it recognized the government's and the military's involvement
and apologized for it?

"I would like to ask you whether it was ever adopted by the cabinet
or by the Diet. At the time of its apology, Japan was very
selective. It would be issued by the prime minister and approved by
the Diet."

-- Will the House vote on the resolution after Prime Minister Abe
visits the US?

"We will constrain all our moves until after the prime minister
visits the US, out of courtesy for his position. Otherwise, I fear
it would have an impact on his influence. I would like the prime
minister to try to gain an understanding of the American people. By
delaying the adoption of the resolution, we are giving him a chance
to the do so. The voting on it will be in May."

-- What is the outlook?

"There are already 75 co-sponsors of the resolution. These are not
just Democrats but Republicans, as well. There are not just liberals

TOKYO 00001420 005 OF 008


supporting it; there are conservatives lined up, as well. House
Speaker Pelosi also backs it. Out target is 120. (The total count in
House is 435).

5) US Senator sends letter to House of Representatives stating
opposition to comfort-women resolution: "It will have an ill effect
on US relations with Japan"

SANKEI (Page 2) (Excerpt)
April 1, 2007

By Takashi Arimoto in Washington

This newspaper learned on March 30 that Senator Daniel Inouye
(elected from Hawaii), a member of the Democratic Party with
Japanese ancestry, has sent letters to Democratic Rep. Tom Lantos,
who heads the House Foreign Relations Committee, and other members
of the House urging them not to adopt a resolution submitted to the
House that denounces Japan on the comfort-women issue. He stated:
"It is not only unnecessary, it also would have an ill-effect on US
relations with Japan."

It is rare for a Senator to come out with a objection to a
resolution before the House of Representatives. The resolution was
presented to the House by another member of Congress of Japanese
ancestry, Mike Honda (Democrat), but the opposition statement by
Inoue, who is a senior member of the Democratic Party, is likely to
have an effect on the course of the resolution as it makes its way
through the House.

6) Japanese, US researchers participate in symposium on Japan's war
of aggression, including "wartime comfort women" issue, held in
Washington

AKAHATA (Page 6) (Full)
April 2, 2007

Yumi Kamazuka, Washington

A symposium to discuss Japan's past colonial rule and war of
aggression and relations with Asian countries today was held in
Washington on March 30. The conference was hosted by the
Washington-based US Institute of Peace (USIP). Japanese researchers
and civic activists were invited to the meeting, and joining the
meeting were some 50 American researchers.

In the session, lawyer Hiroshi Oyama introduced the so-called
"Ienaga" textbook suit and suits filed by Chinese victims of the war
and pointed out that in this series of lawsuits, "facts of Japan's
aggression were acknowledged in detail."

Shinichi Arai, professor emeritus at Ibaraki University and
Surugadai University, based on his experience as an army soldier at
the time of the end of WWII, told about how the military of the time
destroyed evidence, saying, "I was ordered to burn all documents."
He asserted that the lack of "definite documentation" has allowed
"assumptions and irresponsible arguments" denying historical facts
to "spread."

Tokushi Kasahara, professor at Tsuru University, based on his survey
of Japanese and Chinese students, explained about the gap in
historical perceptions between the two countries. Touching on

TOKYO 00001420 006 OF 008


Japan's political situation, Kasahara said politicians have
obstructed inclusions of descriptions of such matters as the Nanjing
Massacre in school textbooks and mentioned their series of "attacks
against textbooks."

USIP's Deputy Director of Education Program Helsing, who presided
over the meeting, lauded reports from Japanese participants as "one
move of Japan that is not reported by mass media." Rumiko Nishino,
director of the Women's Active Museum on War and Peace (WAM),
referred to the role played by a civilian court, the "Women's
International War Crimes Trial," which tried the case of the former
Imperial Japanese Army's sexual slavery in 2000 and explained that
the WAM is trying to make clear the responsibilities of the
assailant country.

Hidemaru Kin, who served as chief of the secretariat at the "Kusa no
Ne" (Grassroots) Peace Memorial Hall in Kochi City, reported that a
Japan-South Korea joint civic group investigated the remains of
Korean victims of forced labor in Hokkaido during WWII.

Summing up the conference, Prof. Mike Mochizuki at George Washington
University, stated that when it came to America's involvement in the
process of Japan and East Asian countries resolving the historical
issues as "judge and mediator," "The US was not clean either, so I
can't assure what the US did was good." Mochizuki suggested
"supporting an effort to build a institutional foundation for
holding discussions at each society level."

The Japanese participants plan to hold a series of symposiums to
pursue war responsibility in Asia and Europe this year marking the
70th anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre. They regard the conference
in Washington this time as the first round of that series.

7) Screeners of high-school textbooks revise passages on Battle of
Okinawa to remove "military coercion" of civilians to commit mass
suicide

ASAHI (Top play) (Excerpts)
March 31, 2007

In the process of screening geography, history, and civics
textbooks, the Education Ministry asked textbook publishers for the
first time ever to remove the description "the former Imperial
Japanese Army forced civilians" to commit mass suicide in passages
describing the Battle of Okinawa, the Asahi Shimbun has learned.
This change reflects a shift in the ministry previous judgment on
the grounds of documents and testimonies denying military coercion.
Regarding issues relating to foreign and political affairs, such as
the Iraq war and the prime minister's visits to Yasukuni Shrine,
textbook publishers have continued to be asked over the past several
years to follow the government's views in textbook descriptions.

The textbooks subject to the screening this time were the ones for
high school students (mainly sophomores and juniors). A total of 222
out of 224 textbooks were approved. The two not approved were both
biology textbooks. Among the category of geography, history, and
civics textbooks, seven history textbooks that stated that in the
Battle of Okinawa, "the former Imperial Japanese Army forced
civilians to commit suicide," were told by the ministry: "It is not
possible to conclude that the military ordered civilians to commit
mass suicide. The description may cause a misunderstanding." As a
result, the publishers of these seven textbooks revised the

TOKYO 00001420 007 OF 008


description in question to read: "Civilians were driven to commit
suicide." This sort of suggestion was not given in the process of
screening history textbooks last year.

The ministry explained the reasons for the shift from its previous
judgment: (1) there are two kinds of documents, those asserting
there were "military orders" and others denying there were orders;
(2) the former military personnel who were alleged to have ordered
civilians to commit mass suicide on Kerama islands and the bereaved
families (of those who had died) filed libel suits; (3) recent
studies have placed more importance on civilians' mental condition
than whether there were orders or not. The ministry will inform
publishers whose textbooks were approved in the screening last year
of its current judgment, but it will not ask them to revise their
textbooks immediately.

8) Prime Minister Abe: Japan had no choice but to support start of
Iraq war

MAINICHI (Page 5) (Full)
March 31, 2007

Asked by reporters about Japan having supported the US decision to
launch the Iraq war, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on March 30
responded:

"At that time there was a rational reason for Japan to back the US
armed attacks. Although the United Nations Security Council
repeatedly warned Iraq, that country ignored UNSC resolutions. Japan
had no choice but to support the war, even though there was no proof
that Iraq possessed weapons of mass destruction."

9) Prime minister meets with Kissinger

SANKEI (Page 5) (Full)
March 31, 2007

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe met on March 30 with former US Secretary
of State Henry Kissinger, who is now visiting Japan, at the Prime
Minister's Official Residence (Kantei). Kissinger expressed
understanding for Japan's position regarding the issue of North
Korea's abductions of Japanese nationals. Abe and Kissinger shared
the perception that it is important for Japan and the United States
to strengthen cooperation in order to resolve the abduction issue,
as well as to have North Korea abandon all its nuclear weapons
programs. Kissinger also met later with Foreign Minister Taro Aso.

10) Japan, South Korea have no secret agreement on Takeshima/Dokdo
islets

SANKEI (Page 5) (Full)
March 31, 2007

The government adopted in a cabinet meeting on March 30 a response
letter denying media reports that there was a secret agreement that
Japan and South Korea would not raise objections to the other's
territorial claims over the Takeshima/Dokdo islets. The letter says
that Japan cannot accept South Korea's illegal occupation of the
islets and that an agreement between the two countries made in
secret cannot be permitted. The cabinet decision was made to respond

SIPDIS
to a question by House of Representatives member Mineo Suzuki of the
New Party Taichi.

TOKYO 00001420 008 OF 008

SCHIEFFER

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