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Cablegate: Daily Summary of Japanese Press 04/10/07

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DE RUEHKO #1564/01 1002303
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
P 102303Z APR 07
FM AMEMBASSY TOKYO
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC PRIORITY 2502
INFO RUEKJCS/SECDEF WASHDC PRIORITY
RHEHAAA/THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTON DC PRIORITY
RUEAWJA/USDOJ WASHDC PRIORITY
RULSDMK/USDOT WASHDC PRIORITY
RUCPDOC/USDOC WASHDC PRIORITY
RUEAIIA/CIA WASHDC PRIORITY
RUEKJCS/JOINT STAFF WASHDC//J5//
RHHMUNA/HQ USPACOM HONOLULU HI
RHHMHBA/COMPACFLT PEARL HARBOR HI
RHMFIUU/HQ PACAF HICKAM AFB HI//CC/PA//
RUALSFJ/COMUSJAPAN YOKOTA AB JA//J5/JO21//
RUYNAAC/COMNAVFORJAPAN YOKOSUKA JA
RUAYJAA/COMPATWING ONE KAMI SEYA JA
RUEHNH/AMCONSUL NAHA 3066
RUEHFK/AMCONSUL FUKUOKA 0611
RUEHOK/AMCONSUL OSAKA KOBE 4138
RUEHNAG/AMCONSUL NAGOYA 9927
RUEHKSO/AMCONSUL SAPPORO 1537
RUEHBJ/AMEMBASSY BEIJING 6524
RUEHUL/AMEMBASSY SEOUL 2597
RUCNDT/USMISSION USUN NEW YORK 3866

UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 09 TOKYO 001564

SIPDIS

SIPDIS

DEPT FOR E, P, EB, EAP/J, EAP/P, EAP/PD, PA
WHITE HOUSE/NSC/NEC; JUSTICE FOR STU CHEMTOB IN ANTI-TRUST DIVISION;
TREASURY/OASIA/IMI/JAPAN; DEPT PASS USTR/PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICE;
SECDEF FOR JCS-J-5/JAPAN,
DASD/ISA/EAPR/JAPAN; DEPT PASS ELECTRONICALLY TO USDA
FAS/ITP FOR SCHROETER; PACOM HONOLULU FOR PUBLIC DIPLOMACY ADVISOR;
CINCPAC FLT/PA/ COMNAVFORJAPAN/PA.

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: OIIP KMDR KPAO PGOV PINR ECON ELAB JA
SUBJECT: DAILY SUMMARY OF JAPANESE PRESS 04/10/07


INDEX:

(1) Poll on Japan's Constitution (Yomiuri)

(2) Confidence-building for "strategic reciprocity" through frank
dialogue, exchanges of views

(3) Japan-China poll: 90% see need to strengthen friendships between
Japan, China, US; 40% hope for better ties between Japan, China

(4) College poll in Japan, China: Students first seek to display
capability at work; Job security comes next in Japan, high earnings
weighed in China

(5) Editorial: MSDF leak of Aegis intelligence -- Is this an
organization to rely on for national defense?

ARTICLES:

(1) Poll on Japan's Constitution (Yomiuri)

YOMIURI (Pages 15) (Full)
April 6, 2007

Questions & Answers
(Figures shown in percentage)

Q: What's your interest in the Constitution of Japan? If there's
anything you are particularly interested in, pick as many as you
like from among those listed below.

The Emperor and imperial household
20.4
Japan's war renunciation, Self-Defense Forces
48.4
Equality, discrimination
15.9
Freedom of speech, press, and all other forms of expression
11.7
Information disclosure
15.3
Privacy protection
16.7
The right to live in peace, social welfare
22.3
Environmental disruption
29.8
The rights to assemble, demonstrate, and strike
1.8
Electoral system
11.8
The right of access to the courts
14.9
Official visits to Yasukuni Shrine
20.0
Constitutional revision
18.1
Separation of the three powers of administration, legislation, and
judicature
3.2
Local autonomy
14.1
The Diet's bicameral system

TOKYO 00001564 002 OF 009


6.3
The process and background of establishing the Constitution
5.6
Other answers (O/A) + nothing in particular (NIP) + no answer (N/A)

13.7

Q: Do you think it would be better to amend the Constitution?

Yes 46.2
No 39.1
N/A 14.7

Q: (Only for those who answered "yes" to the foregoing question)
Why? Pick as many reasons as you like from among those listed
below.

Because it's a US-imposed constitution 30.2
In order to expressly stipulate Japan's right of self-defense and
the existence of the Self-Defense Forces 27.2
Because there are too many cases claiming rights while neglecting
obligations 21.1
Because the conventional way of reading or applying the
Constitution's provisions would lead to confusion if and when there
is a need to meet situational changes 31.9
Because Japan is expected to make international contributions, and
there are also various challenges Japan cannot meet under its
present-day constitution. 47.6
O/A 2.6
N/A 1.5

Q: (Only for those who answered "yes" to the foregoing question)
When would you like the Constitution to be amended? Pick only one
from among those listed below.

Within 3 years 50.7
Within 5 years 24.8
Within 10 years 6.7
O/A 1.2
NIP 12.9
N/A 3.6

Q: (Only for those who answered "no" to the foregoing question) Why?
Pick as many reasons as you like from among those listed below.

Because the Constitution has already taken root in the nation

44.1
Because the Constitution is of a pacifist nature, Japan can be proud
of it
46.9
Because the Constitution guarantees fundamental human rights and
democracy
22.8
Because the Constitution can be interpreted or applied in a flexible
way with the change of the times
19.7
Because revising the Constitution may pave the way for Japan to turn
into a military power
32.1
O/A
0.7
N/A

TOKYO 00001564 003 OF 009


2.2

Q: The Constitution's Article 9 stipulates that Japan renounces war
and will never maintain any war potential. The government has so far
responded to relevant problems with its interpretation and
application of the article. What do you think the government should
do about Article 9 from now on? Pick only one from among those
listed below.

The government should continue with its interpretation and operation
of Article 9
35.8
The government's conventional way of responding to problems with its
constitutional interpretation and operation has now reached its
limit, so Article 9 should be amended
35.7
The government should strictly abide by Article 9 and should not
respond to problems via interpretation or operation
20.0
O/A
0.2
N/A
8.3

Q: The Constitution's Article 9 has two paragraphs. The first
paragraph stipulates Japan's war renunciation. Do you think this
paragraph should be amended?

Yes 14.0
No 80.3
N/A 5.7


Q: The second paragraph in Article 9 stipulates Japan's maintenance
of no war potential. Do you think this paragraph should be amended?

Yes 38.1
No 54.1
N/A 7.8

Q: The government has been taking the position that although Japan
has the right to collective self-defense, the Constitution does not
allow Japan to exercise this right. What do you think about this?
Pick only one that is closest to your opinion from among those
listed below.

The Constitution should be amended so that Japan can exercise the
right of collective self-defense 20.8
The Constitution should be reinterpreted so that Japan can exercise
the right of collective self-defense 20.6
Japan should continue as it has done and need not be allowed to use
the right of collective self-defense 50.0
O/A 0.1
N/A 8.5

Q: The Constitution stipulates the Diet shall consist of two houses,
namely the House of Representatives (lower chamber) and the House of
Councillors (upper chamber). There are various arguments about this
bicameral parliamentary system. Pick only one that is closest to
your opinion.

The Diet should change its bicameral-chamber system to the
unicameral-chamber system 21.8

TOKYO 00001564 004 OF 009


The bicameral-chamber system should be maintained, and the House of
Representatives' role and authority should be strengthened
7.9
The bicameral-chamber system should be maintained, and the House of
Councillors' role and authority should be strengthened 18.7
The Diet should maintain its current two-chamber system as is
44.2
O/A 0.7
N/A 6.7

Q: If there's anything you think it would be better to revise in the
Constitution or add to the Constitution, pick as many as you like
from among those listed below.

The Emperor's status 15.0
Japan's maintenance of armed forces for self-defense 23.2
Proactive international cooperation 23.3
Right to access government information 17.8
Privacy protection 21.4
Respect for family 13.3
The right to live in a good environment 25.3
The prime minister's strengthened powers to deal with emergencies,
etc. 12.5
The lower and upper houses' respective roles 11.8
Central and local government roles 21.9
Establishment of a constitutional court 4.2
O/A 0.1
NIP 23.8
N/A 4.1

Q: This May marks the 60th anniversary of the Constitution since it
came into effect. What do you think about the Constitution and its
role played in Japanese society?

Appreciate very much 37.9
Appreciate somewhat 46.8
Don't appreciate very much 7.8
Don't appreciate at all 2.2
N/A 5.4

Q: There is an opinion saying Japan has maintained peace and
achieved economic growth under its present-day constitution. Do you
agree to this opinion?

Yes 86.5
No 10.1
N/A 3.4

Q: There is an opinion saying Japan remains unable to make
sufficient contributions to international peace cooperation
activities under its present-day constitution because its people are
concerned about Japan's peace only. Do you agree to this opinion?

Yes 37.5
No 56.8
N/A 5.7

Q: There is an opinion saying the idea of respecting individual
freedoms and rights has now taken root. Do you agree to this
opinion?

Yes 66.3
No 27.6

TOKYO 00001564 005 OF 009


N/A 6.1

Q: There is an opinion saying people now neglect the public good as
a result of respecting individual freedoms and rights. Do you agree
to this opinion?

Yes 48.0
No 41.4
N/A 10.7

Q: There will be an election this summer for the House of
Councillors. When you choose a candidate and a political party to
vote for, do you factor in their views about the Constitution?

Yes 40.7
No 28.7
Can't way which 27.5
N/A 3.2

Polling methodology
Date of survey: March 17-18.
Subjects of survey: 3,000 persons chosen from among all eligible
voters throughout the country (at 250 locations on a stratified
two-stage random-sampling basis).
Method of implementation: Door-to-door visits for face-to-face
interviews.
Number of valid respondents: 1,741 persons (58.0% )
Breakdown of respondents: Male-49%, female-51% ; persons in their
20s-11%, 30s-16%, 40s-16%, 50s-20%, 60s-21%, 70 and over-16% ; big
cities (Tokyo's 23 wards and government-designated cities)-22%,
major cities (with a population of more than 300,000)-18%,
medium-size cities (with a population of more than 100,000)-25%,
small cities (with a population of less than 100,000)-23%, towns and
villages-12%.

(2) Confidence-building for "strategic reciprocity" through frank
dialogue, exchanges of views

NIHON KEIZAI (Page 9) (Slightly abridged)
April 10, 2007

Nobumichi Izumi

Japan and China will hold a summit meeting in Tokyo after a hiatus
of six and a half years, but the real leading actor in the meeting
would be North Korea. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and China's Premier
Wen Jiabao will meet tomorrow, April 11, while North Korea will open
its Supreme People's Assembly (equivalent to Japan's parliament) in
Pyongyang that day. The Supreme People's Assembly will take place at
this time of year. Western media are likely to report on the Abe-Wen
talks in the context of North Korea's nuclear issue instead of
"strategic, reciprocal relations" between Japan and China.

It may not have been a mere coincidence that North Korea tested its
nuclear device the day after Abe and Chinese President Hu Jintao
agreed in the first Japan-China summit in five years in Beijing on
Oct. 8 last year to aim for "strategic reciprocity." The fact that
Tokyo and Beijing were coming closer to each other should have
irritated Pyongyang, which is dependent on China for its lifelines,
such as energies.

As a matter of course, North Korea, including the issue of
abductions of Japanese citizens by North Koreans, will be among key

TOKYO 00001564 006 OF 009


subjects of discussions in the upcoming Japan-China summit talks
slated for tomorrow. In order to resolve that issue, Japan and China
need to build a trust relationship. "Using the opportunity of
Premier Wen's visit to Japan, we must flesh out the strategic,
reciprocal relations so that China-Japan relations will not slide
back," Chinese Ambassador to Japan Wang Yi said. He called on the
Lower House speaker and the Upper House president and set the stage
for Wen to deliver a speech before the Japanese Diet as the first
Chinese premier.

In addition to the North Korean issue, the two countries share the
common subjects described by this buzzword: "the environment and
energies." Whether the issue of developing gas fields in the East
China Sea will make progress is drawing attention at present. Ahead
of his tour of Japan, Wen told a press briefing in Beijing: "I
believe that we can resolve the issue in a peaceful manner and turn
the East Chine Sea into a sea of peace, cooperation, and
friendship."

Wen describes Abe's visit to China last October that broke the
stalled relations with Japan as a "trip to break the ice" and his
own trip to Japan this time as a "trip to thaw the ice." If he were
to pave the way for resolving the pending issue of gas-field
development during his stay in Japan, his trip to Japan would become
a symbol of strategic reciprocity. Also, his trip to Japan would
serve as an occasion to thaw the icy relations between Japan and
China that have continued since former Prime Minister Junichiro
Koizumi visited Yasukuni Shrine while he was in power.

"I was born to a family of educators living in a farm village and
experienced the disturbance of war in my childhood." This remark
came from Wen during his first press briefing after taking office as
premier in March 2003.

Wen's parents live in a suburb of Tianjin City. The area around his
home and an elementary school built by his grandfather were
reportedly burned down by the former Imperial Japanese Army during
the war. It is easily conceivable that Wen has mixed feelings toward
Japan.

After the war. Wen went to the famous Nankai High School in Tianjin
and enjoyed playing baseball.

Wen hopes to play baseball with college students and others in Kyoto
on April 13. Wen's last visit to Japan was 15 years ago, but Wen is
not well known to the Japanese public. We hope to see Wen engage in
frank dialogue and exchange of views in his series of events here in
Japan in order to promote mutual understanding at the
grassroots-level and build confidence between the two countries,
beyond love and hate.

(3) Japan-China poll: 90% see need to strengthen friendships between
Japan, China, US; 40% hope for better ties between Japan, China

YOMIURI (Page 1) (Full)
April 8, 2007

Ahead of Chinese Prime Minister Wen Jiabao's visit to Japan from
April 11, the Yomiuri Shimbun and Oriental Outlook Weekly-a weekly
journal published by China's Xinhua News Agency-conducted a joint
survey to probe the attitudes of university students in Japan and
China. According to findings from the survey, the greater part of
respondents both in Japan and in China thought that Japan-China

TOKYO 00001564 007 OF 009


relations were in "bad" shape. However, those thinking Japan, China,
and the United States should strengthen their respective friendships
accounted for about 90% both in Japan and in China.

The survey, planned by the Yomiuri Weekly and Oriental Outlook
Weekly, was conducted in late March. In Japan, college students were
polled on the Internet, and answers were obtained from a total of
1,020 persons. In China, a questionnaire form was distributed to
college students, and a total of 987 persons responded to the
survey.

In the survey, respondents were asked if they thought Japan, China,
and the United States should bolster their respective friendly
relations for peace and stability in Asia. In response to this
question, 89% answered "yes" in Japan, with 91% giving the same
answer in China.

Asked about the current state of Japan-China relations, "bad" views
totaled 84% in Japan and 90% in China. "Good" views totaled 11% in
Japan and 6% in China.

In Japan, there are bad feelings over China's territorial claim to
the Senkaku islets and its gas exploitation projects in the East
China Sea. In addition, there is still a strong impression in Japan
of anti-Japanese demonstrations that occurred in China about two
years ago. In China, there were repercussions from history issues
and former Prime Minister Koizumi's visits to Yasukuni Shrine. In
both countries, students took a severe view of current Japan-China
relations.

However, 37% in Japan and 38% in China thought Japan-China relations
would change for the better, with 42% in Japan and 41% in China
saying the relations would remain the same. As seen from these
figures, there were also expectations for better ties between the
two countries. Meanwhile, 13% in Japan and 20% in China thought
Japan-China relations would change for the worse.

Respondents were also asked if they expected Japan-China relations
to change for the better with Prime Minister Wen's visit to Japan.
In response to this question, "yes" accounted for 59% in China and
32% in Japan.

(4) College poll in Japan, China: Students first seek to display
capability at work; Job security comes next in Japan, high earnings
weighed in China

YOMIURI (Page 7) (Full)
April 8, 2007

The Yomiuri Shimbun and Oriental Outlook Weekly-a weekly journal
published by China's Xinhua News Agency-conducted a joint survey of
Japanese and Chinese university students to probe their attitudes.
In the survey, respondents were asked what they considered to be
important in their sense of purpose when they get jobbed in the
future. For this question, Japanese students were asked to pick only
one from among given choices, with Chinese students allowed to check
all that apply. In response to this question, 52% in Japan and 47%
in China sought to "display my competence and capability at work,"
topping all other answers in both countries. Among other answers,
32% chose "stability" in Japan, with 27% weighing "high earnings" in
China. In Japan, there are many students seeking to have their
future jobs and employment status secured. Meanwhile, Chinese
students seem to be strongly eager for high earnings with their

TOKYO 00001564 008 OF 009


potential exploitation of opportunities to change jobs or start a
business.

In the survey, respondents were also asked what kind of job they
would like to get (for only one choice in Japan and multiple choices
in China). To this question, 29% in Japan and 34% in China answered
that they would like to get a job with a business firm, topping all
other answers in both countries. Among other answers, 28% in Japan
said they would like to become professionals like a doctor or a
lawyer, with 24% in China preferring to become corporate executives.
As seen from these figures, Japanese and Chinese students differed
in their job awareness. Those seeking to become a government
employee accounted for 12% in Japan and 18% in China. This answer
ranked third both in Japan and in China.

In addition, respondents were further asked if they could expect
themselves to be well off in 10 years. In Japan, "yes" accounted for
55%. In China, however, "yes" totaled 92%. Youths in China, now a
rapidly growing economy, seem to be upbeat on the way ahead.

What do you want to consider most important in your sense of purpose
when you get jobbed in the future?

Japan China
Display my competence and capability 51.7 47.1
Stability 31.7 15.9
Get high earnings 10.2 26.8
National, social development 4.5 13.0
Get high social standing 2.0 7.3

(5) Editorial: MSDF leak of Aegis intelligence -- Is this an
organization to rely on for national defense?

YOMIURI (Page 3) (Full)
April 6, 2007

We have doubts about the Maritime Self-Defense Forces (MSDF) being
an organization to rely on for national defense. We have never seen
such a sloppy system for controlling classified information!

It has been discovered that a Maritime Self-Defense Force petty
officer 2nd class, a crewmember of a destroyer, took home
intelligence describing the Aegis vessel. Kanagawa Prefectural
Police and the MSDF Criminal Investigation Unit are now
investigating the case.

There are many unclear points about the case, such as how the
intelligence leaked out. Under the Japan-US Mutual Defense
Assistance Agreement, top-secret intelligence on the capabilities of
defense equipment is classified as "special defense secrets."
Kanagawa police believe the data on the Aegis ships fall into that
category. It is unusual for the police and the MSDF to break down
the turf barrier between them and conduct a joint investigation.
They need to thoroughly clear this matter up.

In connection with an investigation of the seaman's Chinese wife,
who was arrested on suspicion of illegal overstay, the police in
January searched the petty officer's home and confiscated a hard
disk. The disk contained secret data on the Aegis destroyer's radar
performances and missile defense system.

An Aegis is a destroyer known to have the best defense capabilities
in the world. The vessel plays a central role in the missile defense

TOKYO 00001564 009 OF 009


system. The MSDF has now five Aegis destroyers. The United States
has provided the Aegis' defense system to Japan.

It is necessary to analyze the leaked intelligence in detail. The
scandal could have a serious effect on Japan's trust relationship
with the United States. If the information falls into the hands of
other countries, the security of Japan would be threatened.

When the Aegis defense system was updated in 1998, a MSDF petty
officer third class in charge of maintaining and managing the system
likely made the information files for internal use in order to
explain the capabilities of the new system to senior officials and
educate officers in charge of it.

The petty officer second class reportedly told the police that the
date on the Aegis system was included in a disc in which he copied
obscene pictures from his colleague's personal computer. Another
officer also reportedly received the same information. How in the
world has MSDF controlled classified files?

The information could be leaked widely. Although the police say that
there is no evidence that the information went to a third person or
overseas, this is not a matter to reach such a conclusion so
easily.

Not only the MSDF but also the Defense Ministry, as well, has had a
number of intelligence-leakage scandals. Whenever such a scandal
came up, authorities could have reviewed their information
management systems and tightened discipline.

There seems to be systematic laxity in the control of defense
secrets and a lack of awareness of the importance of such controls.

SIPDIS
Japan and the United States are aiming to sign a general security
agreement on military intelligence in order to prevent secret data
from being transferred to third countries. This would be a good
chance to review what substantial measures are needed to prevent a
recurrence.

Japan does not have an espionage law to protect national and defense
secrets that other countries normally have. The government should

SIPDIS
look into what legal measures may also be needed.

SCHIEFFER

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