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Cablegate: Daily Summary of Japanese Press 05/30/07

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RUEHUL/AMEMBASSY SEOUL 3291
RUCNDT/USMISSION USUN NEW YORK 4447

UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 05 TOKYO 002412

SIPDIS

SIPDIS

DEPT FOR E, P, EB, EAP/J, EAP/P, EAP/PD, PA
WHITE HOUSE/NSC/NEC; JUSTICE FOR STU CHEMTOB IN ANTI-TRUST DIVISION;
TREASURY/OASIA/IMI/JAPAN; DEPT PASS USTR/PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICE;
SECDEF FOR JCS-J-5/JAPAN,
DASD/ISA/EAPR/JAPAN; DEPT PASS ELECTRONICALLY TO USDA
FAS/ITP FOR SCHROETER; PACOM HONOLULU FOR PUBLIC DIPLOMACY ADVISOR;
CINCPAC FLT/PA/ COMNAVFORJAPAN/PA.

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: OIIP KMDR KPAO PGOV PINR ECON ELAB JA
SUBJECT: DAILY SUMMARY OF JAPANESE PRESS 05/30/07
Part-2


INDEX:
(7) AmerAsian School in Okinawa marks 10th anniversary of its
foundation; Graduates take a step forward toward achieving their
dreams in US or in Okinawa

(8) Poll: 56 percent weigh pension, 15 percent opt for
constitutional reform

(9) Poll on Abe cabinet, political parties

Articles:
(7) AmerAsian School in Okinawa marks 10th anniversary of its
foundation; Graduates take a step forward toward achieving their
dreams in US or in Okinawa

OKINAWA TIMES (Excerpts)
May 29, 2007

Koji Hirokazu

The AmerAsian School in Okinawa (whose acting director is Naomi
Noiri) will mark the 10th anniversary of its foundation on June 1.
This school was established by four mothers to help children
unwilling to go to school because of prejudice and differences in
languages and cultures and also because of institutional problems.

To study a university in US, his father's country

Clayton Yonamine (18), who was one of the first students to graduate
from the school, this spring graduated from the Futenma Senior High
School. He will go to a university in Texas, where his father lives.
He considered studying at a university in the prefecture, but he
finally made up his mind to go to the United States because he
"wants to study business administration in the US, the home of
business administration."

"I'm aware of going abroad, but I don't have any anxiety," Clayton
said, adding that he enjoyed attending both the AmerAsian School and
public school, and that he now realizes he has "two aspects of
myself."

When he was a little boy, Clayton assumed that if he attended a
Japanese school, he would be bullied. But he realized later that by
attending the AmerAsian School, where Japanese and American
teachers, parents, and volunteers worked together, he was able to
get along with others, if he had good communications with them.

It was also great encouragement for him to know that Amerasians live
not only in Okinawa but also in other countries. "Now I think I can
live elsewhere around the world, for I have a variety of options,"
Clayton said.

Learns from mother

Ken Sayer (21), who likewise was one of the first students to
graduate from the AmerAsian School, is now a senior at Okinawa
International University. His dream is to try to launch a business,
while also aiming at becoming a professional musician in the
prefecture.

"I want to be successful in both in order to be able to support the
AmerAsian School. I owe what I am now to the school," Ken said.

TOKYO 00002412 002 OF 005

When he was nine years old, Ken was turned away at a grocery store
in his neighborhood with the words, "No Americans allowed." He was
not strong enough at the time to be able to retort. This experience
made him feel that Okinawa was somewhat oppressive. But now he has a
different feeling. Ken said: "I assume that those who discriminate
against us lack knowledge or have reasons for doing so. I assert my
views openly, but at the same time I listen to the views of others.
Nothing will ever be resolved if we simply play the victim."

Ken inherits this sort of positive thinking from his mother, Midori,
the first president of the AmerAsian School. Ken noted: "(My mother)
did not give up on the plan to establish a school even though there
was no guarantee for her to succeed and despite much criticism. She
established the school based on her convictions. Many people helped
her. I really respect her. I believe in myself and want to continue
to try."

Give courage to their juniors

Ken is three years older than Clayton, but both share the same
feelings. They promise each other to reunite on a world stage as
Amerasians someday in the future. Both said unfalteringly, "We want
to become someone who can give courage to the younger members of our
school."

(8) Poll: 56 percent weigh pension, 15 percent opt for
constitutional reform

NIHON KEIZAI (Page 2) (Abridged)
May 28, 2007

In a recent public opinion survey conducted May 25-27, the Nihon
Keizai Shimbun asked respondents to pick one or more policies they
weigh in this July's election for the House of Councillors. In
response, a total of 56 percent chose "pension, welfare, and other
social security policies," topping all other answers. The
government's failure to record payments into public pension plans is
also a matter of high interest to the public, as it has now become a
point at issue. Meanwhile, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has been laying
emphasis on "constitutional revision." This issue, however, was in
seventh place at 15 percent. Respondents were also asked which
political party or which political party's candidate they would like
to vote for in this summer's House of Councillors election. In this
popularity rating, the ruling Liberal Democratic Party stood at 33
percent, with the leading opposition Democratic Party of Japan
(Minshuto) at 22 percent.

-- Questions & Answers
(Figures shown in percentage. Parentheses denote findings from the
last survey conducted in April.)

Q: Do you support the Abe cabinet?

Yes 41 (53)
No 44 (37)
Can't say (C/S) + don't know (D/K)
15 (11)

Q: Which political party do you support or like now?

Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) 41 (43)

TOKYO 00002412 003 OF 005


Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ or Minshuto) 23 (21)
New Komeito (NK) 3 (6)
Japanese Communist Party (JCP) 4 (4)
Social Democratic Party (SDP or Shaminto) 3 (3)
People's New Party (PNP or Kokumin Shinto) 0 (0)
New Party Nippon (NPN or Shinto Nippon) 0 (0)
Other political parties 0 (0)
None 20 (20)
C/S+D/K 6 (4)

Q: Do you appreciate the Abe cabinet's job performance?

Yes 33 (42)
No 49 (42)
Can't say which 7 (5)
Can't say (C/S) + don't know (D/K) 11 (11)

(Note) The total percentage does not become 100 percent in some
cases due to rounding.

The survey was taken May 25-27 by Nikkei Research Inc. over the
telephone on a random digit dialing (RDD) basis. For the survey,
samples were chosen from among men and women aged 20 and over across
the nation. A total of 1,496 households with one or more voters were
sampled, and answers were obtained from 917 persons (61.3 percent).

(9) Poll on Abe cabinet, political parties

MAINICHI (Page 2) (Full)
May 28, 2007

Questions & Answers
(T = total; P = previous; M = male; F = female)

Q: Do you support the Abe cabinet?

T P M F
Yes 32 (43) 29 35
No 44 (33) 53 37
Not interested 22 (23) 17 27

Q: (Only for those who answered "yes" to the above question) Why?

T P M F
Because the prime minister is from the Liberal Democratic Party
17 (14) 18 17
Because something can be expected of the prime minister's leadership
13 (15) 7 18
Because there's a young, fresh image about the prime minister
41 (46) 41 41
Because something can be expected of the prime minister's policy
measures 24 (21) 28 22

Q: (Only for those who answered "no" to the above question) Why?

T P M F
Because the prime minister is from the Liberal Democratic Party
8 (11) 10 5
Because nothing can be expected of the prime minister's leadership
41 (41) 37 46
Because the prime minister is inexperienced, weak
13 (13) 16 11

TOKYO 00002412 004 OF 005


Because I'm opposed to the prime minister's policies
37 (32) 37 37

Q: Which political party do you support?

T P M F
Liberal Democratic Party (LDP)
25 (29) 23 26
Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ or Minshuto)
19 (16) 24 14
New Komeito (NK) 5 (5) 2 7
Japanese Communist Party (JCP)
3 (2) 2 3
Social Democratic Party (SDP or Shaminto)
2 (1) 2 3
People's New Party (PNP or Kokumin Shinto)
0 (1) 0 0
New Party Nippon (NPN or Shinto Nippon)
0 (--) 0 0
Other political parties 1 (1) 1 0
None 44 (42) 44 43

Q: Are you interested in this summer's election for the House of
Councillors?

T P M F
Yes 68 75 62
No 31 24 36

Q: Which political party between the LDP and the DPJ would you like
to see win in this summer's House of Councillors election?

T P M F
LDP 33 (38) 29 37
DPJ 42 (36) 51 35
Other political parties 20 (18) 17 22

Q: If an election were to be held now for the House of Councillors,
which political party or which political party's candidate will you
vote for in your proportional representation bloc?

T P M F
LDP 28 26 30
DPJ 35 45 27
NK 6 3 9
JCP 4 2 5
SDP 3 3 4
PNP 1 1 1
NPN 0 0 --
Other political parties 14 13 15

Q: Then, which political party's candidate will you vote for in your
electoral district?

T P M F
LDP 26 25 28
DPJ 30 38 23
NK 5 3 7
JCP 4 3 5
SDP 2 3 2
PNP 1 1 1
NPN 0 0 --

TOKYO 00002412 005 OF 005


Other political parties 6 5 6
Independent candidate 15 12 18

Q: What do you think is most important when casting your vote in the
House of Councillors election?

T P M F
Social divides 13 13 13
Education 19 16 21
Constitution 14 16 12
Public service personnel reform
6 6 6
Politics and money 12 13 11
Local community issues 5 7 3
Pension 28 25 30

(Note) Figures shown in percentage, rounded off. "0" indicates that
the figure was below 0.5 percent. "--" denotes that no respondents
answered. "No answer" omitted. Figures in parentheses denote the
results of the last survey conducted April 28-29.

Polling methodology: The survey was conducted May 26-27 over the
telephone with the aim of calling a total of 1,000 voters across the
nation on a computer-aided random digit sampling (RDS) basis.
Answers were obtained from 1,031 persons.

SCHIEFFER

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