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Cablegate: Country Clearance for Rita Byrnes

VZCZCXYZ0011
OO RUEHWEB

DE RUEHSB #0567 1761455
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
O 251455Z JUN 07
FM AMEMBASSY HARARE
TO SECSTATE WASHDC IMMEDIATE 1630

UNCLAS HARARE 000567

SIPDIS

SIPDIS

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: OTRA SF ZI
SUBJECT: COUNTRY CLEARANCE FOR RITA BYRNES

REF: STATE 85963

1. Embassy Harare grants country clearance and warmly
welcomes the visit of Rita Byrnes to assist Embassy
Harare Political/Econ section from July 2 to August 19,
2007. Embassy acknowledges that Ms. Byrnes holds a top
secret clearance.

SIPDIS

2. The Embassy has arranged TDY housing accommodations and
transportation for the duration of her stay in Harare.

3. Based on the current economic situation in the country,
using a credit card could significantly increase your
costs. Hotel payment must be made in U.S. cash or
travelers checks. U.S. travelers checks are difficult to
use except to pay hotel bills. Personal checks may be
cashed at the Embassy cashier only for local currency and
at the official exchange rate. Personal checks cannot be
cashed at the Embassy for U.S. currency. Post recommends
that travelers bring enough U.S. currency to cover
anticipated needs in Zimbabwe.

4. Control Officer for the visit will be Political/Econ
OMS Lynn Lykins who can be reached during work hours at
263-3-250-593 extension 205; home at 263-4-496-826;
and cell phone at 263-011 876-096; or via email at
Lykinslt@state.gov An Embassy driver will meet and
assist at the airport.

5. Post strongly urges leaving Embassy Harare's telephone
number with family and business associates before departing
for Zimbabwe so that you can be quickly located in the
event of an emergency. The Embassy telephone number is
263-4-250-593. Marine Security Guard Post extension is
260.

6. Several recent visitors transiting Johannesburg to
Harare have had items stolen from their luggage at
Johannesburg International Airport. Please ensure that
your luggage is locked and hand-carry valuable items.

7. Malaria is prevalent throughout Zimbabwe, except in
Harare. We strongly recommend the use of malaria
prophylaxes and adjunctive measures when traveling outside
of Harare.

8. The exchange rate is currently $100,000 Zim dollars to
US $1, however this rate is subject to frequent change.

9. There is a non-waivable USD 30.00 per person departure
tax, payable at the airport upon leaving Zimbabwe in exact
change only. (Note: the Zimbabwean Government recently
began levying a USD 30.00 fee for US visitors in Zimbabwe,
but airport authorities have been instructed to waive this
fee for travelers with US diplomatic and official
passports. End note.)

10. Harare is designated a high crime post by the
Department of State. The Regional Security Officer (RSO)
is required to brief all TDY visitors staying more than one
week as soon as possible after their arrival at post.
While Harare is a clean and pleasant city, street crime is
a serious problem, particularly in tourist areas. Visitors
have found it safer not to carry valuables, but rather to
store them in hotel safety deposit boxes or safe rooms.
Walking alone or at night downtown is not recommended as
attacks have taken place on public streets and parks. The
RSO recommends leaving all important documents (passports,
plane tickets, etc.) in a hotel safe, and not wearing any
jewelry on the street. In addition, visitors should avoid
hanging a camera around their necks, carrying a protruding
wallet, and carry or showing large amounts of money in
public. We urge visitors to use the same security
precautions they would exercise in any urban area. Avoid
any large gatherings, demonstrations or political rallies
in both rural and urban areas. Occupied farms are also to
be avoided at all times.

11. Road safety/automobile travel: While traveling in
vehicles, doors should be kept locked and windows rolled
up. Car-jackings are common in Harare, and diplomatic
vehicles and personnel are not immune to these attacks by
armed thieves. Highway bandits are active on roads leading
to border areas.

12. As per Secstate 286036, TDYers must coordinate the
transport of official unclassified portable computers that
will be used within the USG controlled access facilities
with the RSO and ISSO.
DELL

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