Search

 

Cablegate: Japanese Morning Press Highlights 08/09/07-1

VZCZCXRO5331
PP RUEHFK RUEHKSO RUEHNAG RUEHNH
DE RUEHKO #3640/01 2210218
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
P 090218Z AUG 07
FM AMEMBASSY TOKYO
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC PRIORITY 6277
INFO RUEKJCS/SECDEF WASHDC PRIORITY
RHEHAAA/THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTON DC PRIORITY
RUEAWJA/USDOJ WASHDC PRIORITY
RULSDMK/USDOT WASHDC PRIORITY
RUCPDOC/USDOC WASHDC PRIORITY
RUEAIIA/CIA WASHDC PRIORITY
RUEKJCS/JOINT STAFF WASHDC//J5//
RHHMUNA/HQ USPACOM HONOLULU HI
RHHMHBA/COMPACFLT PEARL HARBOR HI
RHMFIUU/HQ PACAF HICKAM AFB HI//CC/PA//
RUALSFJ/COMUSJAPAN YOKOTA AB JA//J5/JO21//
RUYNAAC/COMNAVFORJAPAN YOKOSUKA JA
RUAYJAA/CTF 72
RUEHNH/AMCONSUL NAHA 4893
RUEHFK/AMCONSUL FUKUOKA 2468
RUEHOK/AMCONSUL OSAKA KOBE 6069
RUEHNAG/AMCONSUL NAGOYA 1502
RUEHKSO/AMCONSUL SAPPORO 3237
RUEHBJ/AMEMBASSY BEIJING 8282
RUEHUL/AMEMBASSY SEOUL 4345
RUCNDT/USMISSION USUN NEW YORK 5344

UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 08 TOKYO 003640

SIPDIS

SIPDIS

DEPT FOR E, P, EB, EAP/J, EAP/P, EAP/PD, PA;
WHITE HOUSE/NSC/NEC; JUSTICE FOR STU CHEMTOB IN ANTI-TRUST DIVISION;
TREASURY/OASIA/IMI/JAPAN; DEPT PASS USTR/PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICE;
SECDEF FOR JCS-J-5/JAPAN,
DASD/ISA/EAPR/JAPAN; DEPT PASS ELECTRONICALLY TO USDA
FAS/ITP FOR SCHROETER; PACOM HONOLULU FOR PUBLIC DIPLOMACY ADVISOR;
CINCPAC FLT/PA/ COMNAVFORJAPAN/PA.

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: OIIP KMDR KPAO PGOV PINR ECON ELAB JA

SUBJECT: JAPANESE MORNING PRESS HIGHLIGHTS 08/09/07-1

Index:

1) Top headlines
2) Editorials
3) Prime Minister's daily schedule

Schieffer-Ozawa meeting:

4) DPJ head Ozawa rejects US ambassador's request regarding
extension of anti-terror law
5) Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ or Minshuto) President Ozawa, US
Ambassador to Japan Schieffer fail to reach agreement in meeting
6) Ozawa rebuffs Schieffer on anti-terror bill: "We are different
from the LDP"
7) Text of Schieffer-Ozawa meeting
8) Prime Minister Abe hopes to see DPJ understanding of Japan's
international responsibility
9) Meeting with Schieffer an Ozawa "performance" to demonstrate a
"Japan that is now on equal terms" with the US
10) Despite Ozawa's rejection of anti-terror law extension, DPJ is
split on the issue, with coordination of party views bogged down

Articless:

1) TOP HEADLINES

Asahi & Akahata:
Tokyo air pollution suit reaches reconciliation and officially
concludes

Mainichi & Tokyo Shimbun:
DPJ's Ozawa in meeting with US ambassador rejects America's request
for extending Antiterrorism Law

Yomiuri:
Justice minister's panel to recommend easing obligation to disclose
applied to those who take out life insurance

Nikkei:
INPEX to construct a large LNG base in Niigata Prefecture

Sankei:
North and South Korea summit to occur after a hiatus of 7 years

2) EDITORIALS

Asahi:
(1) ROK-DPRK summit: President Roh should speak for the rest of the
world
(2) Bull-Dog case: Shareholders' decision carried weight

Mainichi:
(1) ROK-DPRK summit: Pyongyang's commitment to abandon nuclear
ambitions desired
(2) Can the government present the grounds for extending the
antiterrorism law?

Yomiuri:
(1) Can ROK-DPRK summit lead Pyongyang to abandon nuclear programs?

(2) Ozawa-Schieffer meeting: DPJ's ability to hold reins of
government now in question

TOKYO 00003640 002 OF 008

Nikkei:
(1) Ruling and opposition parties should work together to reform the
public servant system
(2) Don't take excessively conciliatory attitude toward DPRK

Sankei:
(1) ROK-DPRK summit: We expect Seoul to persuade Pyongyang
(2) Antiterrorism Law: Think hard of national interests instead of
political strategy

Tokyo Shimbun:
(1) Can ROK-DPRK summit move the denuclearization process forward?
(2) National Personnel Authority's recommendation on hiking public
servants' salaries absurd

Akahata:
(1) Diet members required to elucidate the full picture of
politics-and-money scandals

3) Prime Minister's Official Residence (Kantei)

Prime Minister's schedule, August 8

NIKKEI (Page 2) (Full)
August 9, 2007

09:30
Met at the Kantei incoming and outgoing UN ambassador Takasu and
Oshima, followed by Vice Foreign Minister Yachi and Deputy Foreign
Minister Kono.

10:21
Met Public Security Intelligence Agency Director-General Yanagi
followed by Science and Technology Minister Takaichi.

11:36
Met Lesotho Prime Minister Mosisili and others.

13:29
Met Foreign Minister Aso.

14:17
et Deputy Foreign Ministers Yabunaka and Kono and Southeast and
Southwest Asian Affairs Department Director-General Atsumi.
Afterward met Global Environment Vice Minister Kojima, MAFF Vice
Minister for International Affairs Murakami, joined by METI Trade
Policy Bureau Director-General Ishige.

16:04
Ashinaga Chairman Tamai and visiting foreign orphans from disasters
and diseases and others in the presence of Deputy Chief Cabinet
Secretary Shimomura.

SIPDIS

16:22
Attended a government, ruling party policy meeting on guidelines for
FY2008 budgetary requests. Afterward met LDP Secretary General
Nakagawa.

17:02
Met World Bank President Zoellick in the presence of Vice Minister
of Finance for International Affairs Shinohara and others. Afterward

TOKYO 00003640 003 OF 008


met National Personnel Authority President Tani and others in the
presence of Chief Cabinet Secretary Shiozaki and Internal Affairs
and Communications Minister Suga. Afterward met Suga.

18:05
Met Deputy Chief Cabinet Secretary Matoba, followed by Shiozaki and
others.

20:48
Returned to his official residence.

4) Ozawa rejects US request to extend antiterror legislation

MAINICHI (Top play) (Full)
August 9, 2007

Ichiro Ozawa, president of the leading opposition Democratic Party
of Japan (Minshuto), met with US Ambassador to Japan Schieffer
yesterday at his party's headquarters. In the meeting, Schieffer,
referring to a legislative measure extending the Antiterrorism
Special Measures Law beyond its Nov. 1 expiry, emphasized the
significance of Japan's contributions to US-led antiterror
operations and asked Ozawa to think over the legislation and its
impact. With this, Schieffer asked Ozawa to continue the
Self-Defense Forces' current backup of US forces under the law. "The
United Nations Security Council has passed no resolution to
authorize the United States' operations," Ozawa said. "We can't act
jointly with the United States," he added. So saying, the DPJ
president conveyed his intention to oppose the idea of extending the
law and rejected the ambassador's request.

The meeting was held at the US ambassador's request. It is unusual
for a US envoy to Japan to make a direct request to the head of an
opposition party to discuss specific legislation. The DPJ and the
rest of the opposition bench now hold a majority of the seats in the
House of Councillors as a result of its July 29 election. The US
side therefore needed to meet the situation. Ozawa in agreeing to
meet with Schieffer, insisted that it be fully opened to the media.

Schieffer played up the importance of Japan's antiterror law-based
activities (in the Indian Ocean) not only for the international
community's security but also for Japan's security, and the
ambassador recounted that 90 PERCENT of the oil Japan imports comes
through the area where US-led naval forces are staged. With this,
Schieffer asked Ozawa to agree to continue Japan's backup of US-led
forces. At the same time, Schieffer also offered to provide even
classified information, if that is needed, for Ozawa to make a
decision as the head of his party. With this, Schieffer indicated
that the United States would consider the DPJ's standpoint of
calling for information disclosure.

In addition, Schieffer also noted that the United Nations has
adopted a resolution intended to secure Afghanistan. "This is a
chance to participate in the operations authorized by the United
Nations," Schieffer said. The ambassador also said he would like the
DPJ and all other parties to consider the matter. With this, the
ambassador sought to constrain the DPJ's political motives.

Ozawa rebutted Schieffer, saying the United States launched the
Afghan war as its own war on terror without waiting for an
international consensus. Ozawa took the position that Japan would
play a proactive role in UN peacekeeping operations. However, Ozawa

TOKYO 00003640 004 OF 008


made it clear that Japan could not participate in US military
operations in Afghanistan. "First of all," Ozawa said, "the United
States must make efforts to build an international consensus."

Under the antiterror law, the Maritime Self-Defense Force has sent
two vessels to the Indian Ocean to refuel US and other foreign naval
vessels. Now that Ozawa has officially conveyed to the US side his
stand against the idea of continuing the MSDF's mission in the
Indian Ocean, the ruling coalition of Prime Minister Abe's Liberal
Democratic Party and New Komeito deem it difficult to seek common
ground with the DPJ in this fall's extraordinary session of the
Diet.

5) No agreement reached in meeting between DPJ's Ozawa and US
ambassador: Will not go along with extension of antiterrorism law

YOMIURI (Page 2) (Full)
August 9, 2007

The major opposition Democratic Party of Japan's (DPJ) President
Ichiro Ozawa yesterday had a first meeting with US Ambassador to
Japan Thomas Schieffer at party headquarters. Ambassador Schieffer
asked for the DPJ's understanding about an extension of the
Antiterrorism Special Measures Law, the legal base for the Maritime
Self-Defense Force's (MSDF) ongoing refueling services to vessels
from the United States, the United Kingdom, and other countries in
the Indian Ocean, but Ozawa refused to go along with the request.

The meeting lasted some 45 minutes and was open to the press corps
in line with Ozawa's desire. The ambassador said, "This is a
multinational force (from the US, Britain, and other countries)
engaged in operations against terrorism. Japan's contributions to
them are vitally important. If Japan were to stop refueling, the UK
and Pakistan would become unable to take part (in the operations)."
Schieffer stressed the need for Japan to extend the law, which
expires on Nov. 1. Schieffer continued, "We are ready to provide
secret intelligence (about US troops)."

SIPDIS

In response, Ozawa explained: "President Bush said, 'The Afghan war
was an American war,' and he launched a war against Afghanistan
without waiting for consensus from the international community.
Japan cannot take part in joint operations with the US and other
countries in areas that are not directly linked to Japan." Ozawa
stressed his position of not allowing the MSDF to engage in support
operations.

Schieffer noted, "The United Nations Security Council (UNSC)
resolution on Afghanistan adopted in March of this year mentioned
(the task force)." But Ozawa rebutted, "There is no UNSC resolution
directly providing for US-led operations." The meeting failed to
reach an agreement.

6) Ozawa snubs US request in meeting with Ambassador to Japan
Schieffer, stressing, "We are different from the LDP"

TOKYO SHIMBUN (Page 2) (Full)
August 9, 2007

US Ambassador Schieffer yesterday met with Democratic Party of Japan
(DPJ or Minshuto) head Ozawa. Schieffer exhaustingly explained the
US position in seeking understanding from Ozawa regarding an
extension of the Antiterrorism Special Measures Law, but Ozawa

TOKYO 00003640 005 OF 008


flatly rejected the US request. What motivated Ozawa to rebuff a
pressing request from Japan's ally?

Schieffer noted, "The war against terrorism is a problem not only
for the US but for the international community as a whole." However,
Ozawa explained that the DPJ's basic policy is that overseas
operations by the Self-Defense Forces (SDF) "must be based on UN
requests." He went on at great length as he pleased with such
comments as, "Unfortunately, Japan cannot take part in activities
led by the US"; and, "The US must first make efforts to obtain
approval from the international community."

The 45-minute meeting was open to the media at Ozawa's wish. This is
an unusual environment for a meeting to discuss a key diplomatic
issue, even though the DPJ is an opposition party. The reason is
because Ozawa characterized this meeting as the best opportunity for
him to make his appeal that his foreign and security policy is
fundamentally different from that of the Abe administration.

The DPJ has consistently criticized the Koizumi and Abe
administrations for falling in step with the hard-line Bush
administration, seeing such as "blindly following the US." Criticism
of the Bush administration's foreign policy is mounting not only in
Japan but also within the US. Given a situation like this, Ozawa
tried to differentiate his party's foreign and security policies
from those of the government and ruling parties. At a time when the
actions of the DPJ are in the spotlight due to the trading of places
between the ruling and opposition camps in the Upper House, the
Antiterrorism Special Measures Law has surfaced as a perfect example
for Ozawa.

The DPJ leadership has been consistently aggressive, with Secretary
General Yukio Hatoyama noting, "It is ludicrous to say that ability
to run the government is to do everything that the US tells us to
do." The DPJ appears to be taking into consideration the possibility
of the Democratic Party taking over from the presidency from the
Republican Party next year, when President Bush serves out his
tenure.

However, some conservative DPJ members, such as former head Seiji
Maehara, take a view that it is necessary to extend the law. Ruling
party members are bound to criticize the DPJ as "opposing for the
sake of opposing."

7) Outline of dialogue between Democratic Party of Japan President
Ichiro Ozawa and US Ambassador to Japan Thomas J. Schieffer

NIKKEI (Page 2) (Full)
August 9, 2007

Ambassador Schieffer: Japan's contribution (of fuel oil, etc.) under
the anti-terrorism special measures law is extremely important.
Without Japan's supplying of fuel, Britain and Pakistan could not
participate in the multinational force. We are prepared at your
decision to provide you with the necessary classified information.

President Ozawa: I myself and the Democratic Party of Japan hold an
even stronger view than the Liberal Democratic Party government that
Japan must make active contributions for the sake of international
peace. But the Afghan war has been called by President Bush as
America's "war on terror," and he launched it even before an
international consensus was formed. Article 9 of the Constitution is

TOKYO 00003640 006 OF 008


interpreted as limiting the Self-Defense Forces operations to cases
of our country being directly attacked, whether it is a single or a
collective force. We cannot engage in a joint operation with the US
or any other country in a region that has no connection with Japan's
peace and security.

We will actively participate in peace-keeping operations (PKO).

Schieffer: Terrorism is not a US problem; it is a problem for the
international community. I would like you to look at United Nations
Resolution Number 1746, which was issued this March. It is clearly
stated as an international operation recognized by the United
Nations.

Ozawa: My views on terrorists are the same as yours. However, it is
different from country to country as to what measures should be
taken. If there had been a little more patience in your efforts to
obtain the agreement of the international community, we would gladly
join the operations of the international community. Operations
centered on the US in which Japan is participating are not directly
authorized by the UN Security Council.

8) Abe to ask DPJ for understanding

MAINICHI (Page 2) (Full)
August 9, 2007

Democratic Party of Japan (Minshuto) President Ichiro Ozawa
yesterday met with US Ambassador to Japan Schieffer and indicated
that his party would oppose the idea of extending the Antiterror
Special Measures Law. In this respect, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe
told reporters in the evening: "The Self-Defense Forces' activities
conducted by Japan are highly appreciated by the international
community. I want to discuss with the DPJ such international
expectations and Japan's responsibilities."

9) Ozawa presents a "US-Japan alliance based on equality"; Expresses
his opposition to the Antiterrorism Special Measures Law in meeting
with the ambassador

NIKKEI (Page 2) (Abridged)
August 9, 2007

In his meeting yesterday with US Ambassador to Japan Schieffer,
Democratic Party of Japan President Ichiro Ozawa did not soften his
opposition to an extension of the Antiterrorism Special Measures
Law, the focus of the fall extraordinary Diet session. He repeated
and emphasized his UN-centric approach to foreign policy. There were
instances when Ozawa interrupted Schieffer's desperate attempts to
convince him to change his mind. It seems that Ozawa presented an
image of a "US-Japan alliance based on equality" with a change of
administration in mind.

Ozawa has consistently opposed the Antiterrorism Special Measures
Law. When the law was enacted in 2001, Ozawa, as the head of the
Liberal Party, asserted: "If we are not going to change our
interpretation of the Constitution, a law enacted with the intent of
deploying the Self-Defense Forces is unconstitutional." Each time
the law was extended in 2003, 2005, and 2006, he said: "If I support
the law now, there would be no way to explain (why I opposed it
before)."


TOKYO 00003640 007 OF 008


During the meeting with Schieffer, Ozawa insisted that the
endorsement of the UN Security Council was necessary. He actively
supports peacekeeping operations (PKO), but disapproves of
participation in operations against terrorists in Afghanistan,
saying: "It is a US war that President Bush started without getting
approval from the international community."

Ambassador Schieffer brought explanatory papers to the meeting, and
stated: "The vessels of thirteen countries, including the US and the
UK, have participated in the maritime intercept operations, which
the Maritime Self-Defense Forces currently support." Schieffer also
gave UN Resolution 1746 as a basis for US actions, but Ozawa
rejected this explanation, emphasizing: "The UN Security Council has
never directly authorized (the actions of the US)."

There is disagreement within the DPJ regarding Ozawa's philosophy.
In the DPJ Upper House election manifesto, items that were in the
first draft, such as the "use of force in self-defense" or "active
participation in peacekeeping operations," were not included.

10) Ozawa opposes extension of antiterrorism law, setting off
concern among conservative members; Internal party coordination may
face rough going

YOMIURI (Page 4) (Excerpts)
August 9, 2007

Democratic Party of Japan President Ichiro Ozawa in his meeting
yesterday with US Ambassador to Japan Thomas Schieffer indicated
that he would oppose an extension of the Antiterrorism Special
Measures Law. This has sparked concern in the party about a possible
negative impact on Japan-US relations. With some members eager for
holding talks with the ruling parties, Ozawa may find it difficult
to iron out views in the party.

The Ozawa-Schieffer meeting centered on whether the US military
operation in Afghanistan is justified by a UN resolution.

Ozawa said: "The DPJ will actively take part in UN activities based
on a concurrence of the international community." He also indicated
that activities in the Indian Ocean by naval vessels of the United
States and other countries do not meet this requirement.

In response, Schieffer repeatedly said that it is an international
operation authorized by the United Nations by citing UN Security
Council Resolution 1746, adopted this past March. After the meeting,
the US envoy said: "Mr. Ozawa said that his party will join
activities that are authorized by the United Nations. I hope he will
understand that (the activities in the Indian Ocean) are a UN
mission."

The Japanese government also thinks UN Resolution 1746 is a
resolution supporting the war on terrorism in Afghanistan. But a
government official said: "Mr. Ozawa's opposition comes from his
political view rather than from his interpretation of the law. He
will not be convinced into supporting the law's extension."

Ozawa's opposition has triggered concern among conservative members
in the party.

Former DPJ President Seiji Maehara, with the party's call for
withdrawal from Iraq in mind, said: "Should Japan withdraw (SDF

TOKYO 00003640 008 OF 008


troops) as a result of saying 'no' to both missions, that might harm
Japan-US relations greatly. If bilateral relations deteriorate, the
party's ability to assume the country's political reins would be
questioned." Some DPJ members are also concerned that utterly
opposing the extension, like Ozawa is doing, would be viewed as
opposing for sake of opposing.

SCHIEFFER

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
World Headlines

 

New IPCC Report: ‘Unprecedented Changes’ Needed To Limit Global Warming

Limiting global warming to 1.5°C will require “far-reaching and unprecedented changes,” such as ditching coal for electricity to slash carbon emissions, says a special report that finds some of the actions needed are already under way, but the world must move faster… More>>

ALSO:

Jamal Khashoggi: UK, France, Germany Join Calls For Credible Investigation

Germany, the United Kingdom and France share the grave concern expressed by others including HRVP Mogherini and UNSG Guterres, and are treating this incident with the utmost seriousness. More>>

ALSO:

MSF Not Wanted: Nauru Government Shows Continued Callousness

The Nauruan Government’s decision to ask Doctors Without Borders to immediately leave shows continued callousness towards asylum seekers desperately seeking a safe place to call home, Green MP Golriz Ghahraman said today. More>>

ALSO:

Sulawesi Quake, Tsunami: Aid Response Begins

Oxfam and its local partners are standing by to deploy emergency staff and resources to the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, as an estimated 1.5 million people are thought to be affected by the massive earthquake and tsunami that hit on Friday. More>>

ALSO:

Decriminalising Same-Sex Relationships: UN Rights Chief Applauds Indian Decision

“This is a great day for India and for all those who believe in the universality of human rights," Bachelet said. "With this landmark decision, the Indian Supreme Court has taken a big step forward for freedom and equality...” More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 
 
  • Pacific.Scoop
  • Cafe Pacific
  • PMC