Search

 

Cablegate: Civil Space Cooperation: Mfa Presses For

VZCZCXYZ0009
PP RUEHWEB

DE RUEHMO #5035/01 2900719
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
P 170719Z OCT 07
FM AMEMBASSY MOSCOW
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC PRIORITY 4663
INFO RUEHTA/AMEMBASSY ASTANA PRIORITY 0134
RUEHBR/AMEMBASSY BRASILIA PRIORITY 0301
RUEHBY/AMEMBASSY CANBERRA PRIORITY 0672
RUEHUL/AMEMBASSY SEOUL PRIORITY 2691

UNCLAS MOSCOW 005035

SIPDIS

SENSITIVE
SIPDIS

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: TSPA TSPL PREL PARM NASA KZ AS BR KS RS
SUBJECT: CIVIL SPACE COOPERATION: MFA PRESSES FOR
FINALIZATION OF TECHNOLOGY SAFEGUARDS AGREEMENT

REF: STATE 87116

1. (SBU) Summary: On October 12, EUR/PRA Director Antia
Friedt discussed the Framework Technology Safeguards
Agreement (TSA) and other civil space cooperation issues with
Andrei Kruitskikh of MFA's Department of Disarmament and
Security Affairs (DVBR). Kruitskikh noted the good progress
made during the June round of Framework TSA talks (reftel)
and urged that the next negotiating round take place no later
than early December. Friedt tentatively agreed to
Kruitskikh's offer to host the next interagency negotiating
round in November/early December. End Summary.

Framework Technology Safeguards Agreement
-----------------------------------------

2. (SBU) EUR/PRA Director Friedt, accompanied by Embassy
EST, met in Moscow October 12 with DVBR's Kruitskikh and
Sergei Shestakov. Friedt informed Kruitskikh that the latest
TSA negotiating draft was still being reviewed by the

SIPDIS
interagency; she hoped to be able to provide a new draft in
the next week. Friedt asked Kruitskikh to clarify what
Russia wants in terms of access to U.S. space projects and
how this access would be managed. Kruitskikh replied that
everything would be done in accordance with Article V:
Technology Security Plans (TSPs). The TSPs would be drafted,
approved, and supervised by relevant agencies (NASA and
Roskosmos). The plans themselves would be 99% technical,
specific to the joint space project implemented, and in
accordance with national laws and regulations. The
governments would have a "supervisory" or "oversight" role.
Kruitskikh said that the Russian side was at first skeptical
about Article V, but now realizes it is a "perfect solution."
Kruitskikh made a number of other comments regarding ongoing
TSA negotiations with other countries, including Australia,

SIPDIS
Brazil, and South Korea. He repeated comments he made during
negotiations in Washington in June regarding difficulties
encountered during negotiations with the Australians,
including protection of classified information sharing
between the U.S. and Australia.

Other Pending Space-Related Agreements
--------------------------------------

3. (SBU) Friedt asked about the status of two other space
cooperation agreements: the "Agreement for Cooperation in
the Exploration and Use of Space for Peaceful Purposes"
(Civil Space Agreement) and the "Agreement Concerning the
Procedure for the Customs Documentation and Duty-Free Entry
of Good Transported within the Framework of U.S. Russian
Cooperation in the Exploration and Use of Space for Peaceful
Purposes" (Customs Agreement). Both agreements have been
under review by the Russian side since summer. Kruitskikh
replied that the GOR hoped to respond in the next two weeks
via dipnote to extend the agreements. Kruitskikh then
inquired about the status of the Baikonur Technology
Safeguards Agreement. We explained that the English-language
version of the Kazakhstani text still contained several legal
discrepancies which the Government of Kazakhstan (GOK) needed
to address before the Baikonur TSA could move forward. When
asked about the status of the Russian-Kazakstani text,
Kruitskikh said that the GOK was stalling in order to gain
leverage on renegotiating rental terms for the GOR's use of
the Baikonur launch site. Kruitskikh urged us to pressure
the GOK and "discipline the process" in order to get the
Baikonur agreement ratified. Friedt replied that we would
ask our Embassy in Astana to inquire regarding the status.

"Passionately Waiting"
---------------------

4. (SBU) Kruitskikh concluded the meeting by alleging that
President Putin was annoyed that the Framework TSA has been
stalled and that DVBR would like its year-end report to the
President to say that the TSA was ready for signature.
Kruitskikh said he is "passionately waiting" to hear back
from the USG and for experts on both sides to agree to dates
for the next round of negotiations in Moscow, adding that he
hoped to see full U.S. interagency participation, including
NASA. Friedt said she hopes to have interagency feedback on
the text soon and promised to consult with interagency
colleagues and get back to Kruitskikh regarding specific
dates. Kruitskikh said his schedule was free in November,
with the exception of the very last week in November.

Comment
-------

5. (SBU) Kruitskikh is personally committed to a TSA
agreement, but it appears to be less of a priority for others
in the GOR. Deputy Foreign Minister Kislyak has not recently
raised it. Nonetheless, TSA remains a Presidential Checklist
item and we should continue to demonstrate to the Russian
side that we are committed to successfully negotiating this
agreement.
Burns

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
World Headlines

 

Ramzy Baroud: Year in Review Will 2018 Usher in a New Palestinian Strategy

2017 will be remembered as the year that the so-called ‘peace process’, at least in its American formulation, has ended. And with its demise, a political framework that has served as the foundation for US foreign policy in the Middle East has also collapsed. More>>

ALSO:


North Korea: NZ Denounces Missile Test

Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters has denounced North Korea’s latest ballistic missile test. The test, which took place this morning, is North Korea’s third test flight of an inter-continental ballistic missile. More>>

ALSO:

Campbell On: the US demonising of Iran

Satan may not exist, but the Evil One has always been a handy tool for priests and politicians alike.

Currently, Iran is the latest bogey conjured up by Washington to (a) justify its foreign policy interventions and (b) distract attention from its foreign policy failures.

Once upon a time, the Soviet Union was the nightmare threat for the entire Cold War era – and since then the US has cast the Taliban, al Qaeda, and Islamic State in the same demonic role. Iran is now the latest example…More


Catalan Independence:
Pro-independence parties appear to have a narrow majority. More>>