Search

 

Cablegate: Oecd Dsg at Brazil Knowledge Management Conference

VZCZCXRO3444
RR RUEHRG
DE RUEHBR #0003/01 0021945
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
R 021945Z JAN 08 ZDK
FM AMEMBASSY BRASILIA
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC 0750
INFO RUEHRI/AMCONSUL RIO DE JANEIRO 5621
RUEHSO/AMCONSUL SAO PAULO 1392
RUEHRG/AMCONSUL RECIFE 7540

UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 02 BRASILIA 000003

SIPDIS

SIPDIS
PARIS FOR OECD

E.O. 12958:N/A
TAGS: ECON EINV SCUL PREL BR
SUBJECT: OECD DSG AT BRAZIL KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT CONFERENCE


BRASILIA 00000003 001.2 OF 002


1. OECD Deputy Secretary General Thelma Askey spoke at a conference
in Brasilia, the "Fourth International Conference on Knowledge
Management in the Public Sector" on December 11. The Brazilian
Chamber of Deputies, Planning Ministry, Presidential Council for
Economic Development, and Long-Term Planning Secretariat organized
the conference with the Brazilian Association of Knowledge
Management (SBGC). The conference explored how better to
incorporate knowledge management into public administration in
Brazil, drawing on local and international experiences and lessons
learned. The conference considered the definitions of "knowledge
management," noted its effects on economic growth, and examined the
specific situation in Brazil. Other speakers included the Brazilian
Minister of Science and Technology, the head of the Brazilian
Chamber of Deputies, and the Casa Civil (Presidency) E-Government
office. End Summary.

------------------------------
SAMPLING OF BRAZILIAN SPEAKERS
------------------------------

2. Arlindo Chinaglia, Chairman of the Chamber of Deputies, opened
the conference. He noted knowledge management, with origins in the
corporate sector, proves its value in the public sector if it helps
improve the quality of services to the population. He noted the
website Interlegis (www.interlegis.gov.br), developed by the
Brazilian congress with IDB assistance, is an example of knowledge
management. The website furthers government transparency and
information sharing by facilitating public access to congressional
activities and legislation.

3. Sergio Resende, Minister of Science and Technology, noted that
knowledge management is a challenge to Brazil's public sector mainly
due to systemic education problems. As an example, masters and PhD
programs in the United States have existed for 150 years, while in
Brazil these programs began 40 years ago according to the minister.
Brazilian corporations' knowledge management challenges now include
innovation and research and development. The Minister added that
the Brazilian Innovation Law provides subsidies for investment in
technology, including e-government. Rogerio Santana, Executive
Secretary for e-government at the Casa Civil, Presidency of the

SIPDIS
Republic, expanded on this theme, saying knowledge management
includes both what people know and how they share their information.
He mentioned the importance of a public software website,
administered by his office, offering free software to assist local
administrations throughout the country. Santana noted as well that
knowledge management is not only the federal government pushing
information out to local entities. Knowledge management also means
creating opportunities for local-level talent, including indigenous
and riverside cultures, to enrich federal level decision-making.

4. Federal Deputy Gastao Vieira, Education Committee Chairman,
further developed the education theme, strongly asserting Brazil
needs to implement a literacy program for elementary schools,
drawing on best-practices at state level for educational reform. He
noted a 2003 GOB report that found teacher training programs in
Brazil are thirty years out of date. The deputy felt the poor
performance of Brazilian students on the OECD PISA (Program for
International Student Assessment) exams reflected the lack of
investment in education and Brazil's failure to set a few achievable
priorities (e.g. an adequate syllabus, teacher training, and
materials investment) instead of myriad overambitious goals. He
commented that knowledge management and international trade are also
linked, as increased know-how raises exported products' value-added
and trade itself increases knowledge acquisition.

--------------
OECD DSG ASKEY
--------------

5. Thelma Askey, OECD Deputy Secretary-General, spoke on a panel
entitled "The Public Policy of Knowledge Management and the Agenda
of Global Development" with Maristela Baioni, program coordinator in
Brazil for UNDP. Askey underlined that knowledge management is among
OECD governments' top five policy priorities. OECD identifies and
shares best practices in order to enhance this global public good
for all countries. OECD knowledge management goals include: 1)
helping members adapt to change; 2) opening communication channels;
3) furthering investment in higher education and in information
technologies; and 4) promoting integration and exchanges among
academic institutions, the private sector and the public sector.

6. DSG Askey noted that the OECD has an indicator for measuring
investment in knowledge, and that OECD member countries invest, on
average, nearly six percent of GDP in knowledge development and
management. Investment mechanisms include e-government structures;
higher education; development and implementation of research
systems, databases and internet platforms; and partnerships among
governments. Askey stressed that, for the public sector, investment
in knowledge management should target building public trust, for
example through creation of reliable, independent statistics

BRASILIA 00000003 002 OF 002


agencies. Askey advocated that governments should create incentives
for knowledge sharing and should stress transparency and policy
coherence. Ms. Askey concluded by reiterating the importance of
coordination among private sector, academic and public sector
institutions, as well as the importance of sharing experiences and
lessons learned among countries.

7. COMMENT: The conference provided an important opportunity for
Brazilian government, academia and international organizations to
share perspectives on increasing transparency and investment in
knowledge in a democracy. The event, co-planned by Brazil's
executive and legislative branches with civil society participation,
was an interesting and informative step in Brazil's on-going public
sector reform dialogue. END COMMENT

CHICOLA

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
World Headlines

 

Werewolf: Gordon Campbell On North Korea, Neo-Nazism, And Milo

With a bit of luck the planet won’t be devastated by nuclear war in the next few days. US President Donald Trump will have begun to fixate on some other way to gratify his self-esteem – maybe by invading Venezuela or starting a war with Iran. More>>

Victory Declared: New Stabilisation Funding From NZ As Mosul Is Retaken

New Zealand has congratulated the Iraqi government on the successful liberation of Mosul from ISIS after a long and hard-fought campaign. More>>

Gordon Campbell: On The Current US Moves Against North Korea

If Martians visited early last week, they’d probably be scratching their heads as to why North Korea was being treated as a potential trigger for global conflict... More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Lessons From Corbyn’s Campaign

Leaving partisan politics aside – and ignoring Jeremy Corbyn’s sensational election campaign for a moment – it has to be said that Britain is now really up shit creek... More>>

ALSO:

Another US Court: Fourth Circuit Rules Muslim Ban Discriminatory

ACLU: Step by step, point by point, the court laid out what has been clear from the start: The president promised to ban Muslims from the United States, and his executive orders are an attempt to do just that. More>>

ALSO: