Search

 

Cablegate: Major Breakthrough As Cndp Agrees

VZCZCXRO7244
OO RUEHBZ RUEHDU RUEHGI RUEHJO RUEHMR RUEHRN
DE RUEHKI #0058 0211420
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
O 211420Z JAN 08
FM AMEMBASSY KINSHASA
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC IMMEDIATE 7396
INFO RUEHXR/RWANDA COLLECTIVE
RUCNSAD/SOUTHERN AF DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY COLLECTIVE
RHMFISS/HQ USEUCOM VAIHINGEN GE
RUFOADA/JAC MOLESWORTH RAF MOLESWORTH UK
RUEAIIA/CIA WASHDC
RHEFDIA/DIA WASHDC

UNCLAS KINSHASA 000058

SIPDIS

SENSITIVE

SIPDIS

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: PGOV KDEM PHUM MOPS PREL CG
SUBJECT: Major breakthrough as CNDP agrees
to sign Kivus Conference Declaration


1. (SBU) Summary: After intense discussions with leaders of the
Kivus Conference late January 20 and early January 21, CNDP agreed
that it would sign the final conference declaration with some
additional text changes. There remain the issues of getting other
armed groups on board, and approval of the final declaration in
plenary, but conference leaders hope that there can be a signing and
final ceremony on January 22. End Summary.

2. (SBU) Conference leaders Father Apollinaire Malu Malu and
National Assembly President Vital Kamerhe convoked international
representatives late morning January 21 to give the news that, after
three days' discussion, the CNDP had agreed to a final declaration
by the Kivus Conference, which would hopefully be signed and come to
its ceremonial conclusion January 22. Significantly present at the
meeting, but not speaking, was the Minister of State for Interior
Kalume, as well as conference leaders Azarias Ruberwa and Bishop
Jean-Luc Kuye Ndondo.

3. (SBU) Kamerhe said that the three days' of meetings with the
CNDP had focused on issues within all five headings of the proposed
final declaration: ceasefire, disengagement of troops, actions on
humanitarian affairs and human rights, brassage and DDR, and
political and judicial guarantees. On the first day of discussions
agreement had been reached on the need for cessation of hostilities
by all military forces and on general modalities involving movement
of MONUC into critical areas. There had also been rapid agreement
on humanitarian actions and human rights (including recruitment of
child soldiers). A technical commission would be set up, with
involvement of UN agencies, to ensure return of IDP's and refugees
and elaborate a timetable therefore.

4. (SBU) Kamerhe said that issues of disengagement/ brassage and
political/judicial guarantees had been more difficult. He said that
the conference leaders had just emerged from final discussions with
CNDP and come to agreement on disengagement and guarantees. A
technical commission would be set up that would monitor the whole
process leading from disengagement to brassage and DDR, covering
status of troops and reintegration into the army. The parties
agreed that MONUC would enter areas that were demilitarized and
timetables would be established for relocation of troops. Military
barriers now obstructing traffic would be removed. The
international community would be incorporated into the technical
commission. The government would fulfill its obligations under the
Nairobi communiqu to address the FDLR problem with urgency.

5. (SBU) Kamerhe said that the most difficult issue had been
amnesty. There had been some initial confusion on what type of
amnesty could be guaranteed. It was finally agreed that the final
declaration would call on the government to present a "projet de
loi" (draft law) to the legislature on amnesty for insurrection or
political acts, which would have no effect on crimes of war or
against humanity.

6. (SBU) Kamerhe said that the conference leaders would now engage
the other armed groups in similar discussions but he hoped that a
plenary could begin in the course of the day. Kamerhe noted that
CNDP had asked for a separate accord, but he had insisted that the
conference documents, one for North Kivu and one (almost identical)
for South Kivu, cover all armed groups and ethnic communities.
Ending conflict required a global approach. Malu Malu said that the
conference plenary would produce a series of resolutions in addition
to the main declaration.

7. (SBU) Senior Adviser to the Assistant Secretary for African
Affairs Tim Shortley asked in what specific areas the international
community could be most helpful and noted that it was essential to
get maximum publicity of this momentous event, including using the
forum of the upcoming African Union summit. Kamerhe said that the
significant presence and strong involvement of the international
community had been essential to the unfolding success of the
conference, but it would be even more important for the
international community to be strongly involved in the aftermath.
The UNSC and capitals would need to make a strong statement of
support. MONUC would need to move its forces rapidly into the area
and play, with others in the international community, a central role
in the technical commissions established by the conference.
Financial and diplomatic support would be essential for resolving
the humanitarian crisis, pacification, and reconstruction of the
Kivus - effectively, a Marshall Plan. Kamerhe said that Shortley's
role had been vital in the success of the conference.

Brock

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
World Headlines

 

Werewolf: Gordon Campbell On North Korea, Neo-Nazism, And Milo

With a bit of luck the planet won’t be devastated by nuclear war in the next few days. US President Donald Trump will have begun to fixate on some other way to gratify his self-esteem – maybe by invading Venezuela or starting a war with Iran. More>>

Victory Declared: New Stabilisation Funding From NZ As Mosul Is Retaken

New Zealand has congratulated the Iraqi government on the successful liberation of Mosul from ISIS after a long and hard-fought campaign. More>>

Gordon Campbell: On The Current US Moves Against North Korea

If Martians visited early last week, they’d probably be scratching their heads as to why North Korea was being treated as a potential trigger for global conflict... More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Lessons From Corbyn’s Campaign

Leaving partisan politics aside – and ignoring Jeremy Corbyn’s sensational election campaign for a moment – it has to be said that Britain is now really up shit creek... More>>

ALSO:

Another US Court: Fourth Circuit Rules Muslim Ban Discriminatory

ACLU: Step by step, point by point, the court laid out what has been clear from the start: The president promised to ban Muslims from the United States, and his executive orders are an attempt to do just that. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 
 
  • Pacific.Scoop
  • Cafe Pacific
  • PMC