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Cablegate: Niger: Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive

VZCZCXRO9178
PP RUEHTRO
DE RUEHNM #0198/01 0460752
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
P 150752Z FEB 08
FM AMEMBASSY NIAMEY
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC PRIORITY 4113
INFO RUEHUJA/AMEMBASSY ABUJA PRIORITY 0161
RUEHAS/AMEMBASSY ALGIERS PRIORITY 3421
RUEHBP/AMEMBASSY BAMAKO PRIORITY 0433
RUEHCO/AMEMBASSY COTONOU PRIORITY 1059
RUEHDK/AMEMBASSY DAKAR PRIORITY 1896
RUEHOT/AMEMBASSY OTTAWA PRIORITY 0555
RUEHOU/AMEMBASSY OUAGADOUGOU PRIORITY 8624
RUEHFR/AMEMBASSY PARIS PRIORITY 0655
RUEHTRO/AMEMBASSY TRIPOLI PRIORITY
RUCNDT/USMISSION USUN NEW YORK PRIORITY 0186
RUZEHAA/CDR USEUCOM INTEL VAIHINGEN GE PRIORITY
RHMFISS/CDR USEUCOM VAIHINGEN GE PRIORITY
RUEAIIA/CIA WASHDC PRIORITY
RHMFIUU/DEPT OF JUSTICE WASHINGTON DC PRIORITY
RUEATRS/DEPT OF TREASURY WASHINGTON DC PRIORITY
RHEFDIA/DIA WASHINGTON DC PRIORITY
RUEHBS/USEU BRUSSELS PRIORITY 0001

UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 02 NIAMEY 000198

SIPDIS

SENSITIVE
SIPDIS

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: PTER PREL NG
SUBJECT: NIGER: COUNTER-TERRORISM COMMITTEE EXECUTIVE
DIRECTORATE VISIT

REF: NIAMEY 97

1. (U) A U.N. Counter-terrorism Committee Executive
Directorate (CTED) team led by Mike Smith on February 13
briefed diplomats on their visit to Niger. The meeting was
under the auspices of the Counter-Terrorism Action Group
(CTAG) and was hosted by the French Embassy on behalf of G-8
president Japan. The CTED team included representatives of
the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODI), the World Customs
Organization (WCO), Interpol and the African Union Center for
the Research and Study of Terrorism (ACSRT). Niamey-based
diplomats included representatives of the French, German,
Spanish, Canadian and U.S. Embassies, the UNDP resident
representative and the EC delegate. An official from the
Japanese Embassy in Abidjan also attended the meeting.

2. (U) The French Ambassador, who chaired the meeting, noted
that the last CTAG meeting in Niamey was in April 2006 under
the Russian G-8 presidency.

3. (SBU) CTED executive director Smith provided an overview
of CTED. He explained that its mandate was to monitor
implementation of UNSC resolution 1373. It initially met
resistance from many developing countries, who complained
that it identified weakness, but did not provide assistance
to address those weaknesses. It therefore works to try to
link developing country CT needs with G-8 resources. The
objective of the CTED visit to Niger is to analyze Government
of Niger (GON) obligations under UNSCR 1373, assess its
capacity to meet those obligations, and identify sources of
assistance for the GON. Smith and other CTED team members
reviewed their initial findings:

-- There are gaps in GON CT laws and regulation.

-- The GON has only ratified 10 of the 16 international CT
instruments.

-- The GON office responsible for money laundering has
virtually no resources.

-- The GON does not have a good system to track people
entering and exiting the country.

-- There are gaps in aviation security.

-- Separate Customs and Police checkpoints are not efficient.

-- There are flaws in the civil registry which facilitate the
fraudulent obtention of civil documents.

-- The police lack training and resources.

-- The GON's CT structure is unclear.

4. (SBU) The diplomats reviewed their CT cooperation
activities. The French are by far the most active. Their CT
assistance includes:

-- General GON institution building, which has an indirect
effect on CT.

-- Military cooperation. There are 16 French military
personnel working with the Nigerien military. France sends
Nigerien military personnel to France and elsewhere for
training. France also provides about one million euros in
financing. France is helping with transportation and
communications, and built an operations center in Niamey. The
French DATT said the Nigerien military was generally
professional and well motivated, but lacked resources and
suffered from corruption ("affairisme").

-- Police Cooperation. France supports the Police, the

NIAMEY 00000198 002 OF 002


Gendarmerie, the FNIS (a paramilitary force under the
Interior Ministry), and the fire department. It has provided
training on crises management, explosives detection and
established a joint command post. With EU funding, France is
working on a computerizing systems to track people and goods,
developing a police laboratory, assisting with immigration
and trafficking in persons, and providing intelligence
collection and analysis training.

5. (SBU) Assistance provided by other countries included
military assistance (U.S.), police assistance (U.S., Germany,
Canada, EU), judicial sector reform (EU), and immigration
(EU). Several countries also cited general
governance/institution building programs.

6. (SBU) In response to Smith's question about coordination
on police cooperation, the French police advisor said that
while there is no formal structure to coordinate assistance
to the police, he was generally aware of what everyone is
doing. He believed that there is so much to do regarding the
police that the risk of duplication was minimal. The German
DCM said that his government was developing a security sector
plan and would coordinate with the French. (Comment:
Programs to assist the police are important. It is therefore
unfortunate that our effective NADR/ATA program has been
zeroed out for FY2008 and 2009. End Comment.)

7. (SBU) The French Ambassador highlighted the gap between
needs and resources, but noted that countries not represented
in the meeting were also involved in security-related
activities, notably China, Libya and some Arab gulf
countries. He said that the activities by these countries
was not "transparent."

8. (SBU) There was some discussion of how general governance
programs could be tied to CT. The French and Canadian
officials thought good governance was essential for CT. The
EC representative said that some governance problems could be
more focused on CT issues.

9. (SBU) A French representative noted that European
Development Funds are limited to assistance to the police,
and could not be used to assist the army.

10. (U) Tripoli minimize considered
ALLEN

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