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Cablegate: Trafficking in Persons Report (Tip) - Zimbabwe

VZCZCXYZ0019
PP RUEHWEB

DE RUEHSB #0186/01 0701529
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
P 101529Z MAR 08
FM AMEMBASSY HARARE
TO SECSTATE WASHDC PRIORITY 2558

UNCLAS HARARE 000186

SIPDIS

SENSITIVE
SIPDIS

AF/S DESK OFFICER S. HILL
G/TIP FOR R. YOUSEY
NSC FOR SENIOR AFRICA DIRECTOR B. PITTMAN
USAID FOR L.DOBBINS AND E. LOKEN

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: ELAB KCRM KFRD KWMN PHUM PREF SMIG ZI ASEC
SUBJECT: TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS REPORT (TIP) - ZIMBABWE

REF: STATE 02731

THIS CABLE IS SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED -- PROTECT
ACCORDINGLY.

1. (U) The following is Embassy Harare's response to
questions posed to Post in reftel.

--------
OVERVIEW
--------

-- 27 A. (SBU) Zimbabwe is a country of origin, transit, and
destination for internationally trafficked men, women and
children. Women and children are trafficked for labor and
sexual exploitation along the borders with the four
surrounding countries. There have been reports of
Zimbabweans, especially young men and boys, providing labor
for months in South Africa without pay before their employers
report them to authorities for deportation. Many Zimbabweans
suffering labor exploitation in surrounding countries do not
report the offense to authorities out of fear of deportation.
There have been reports of young women and girls being lured
to the People's Republic of China, Egypt, the United Kingdom,
and Canada under false pretenses for commercial sexual
exploitation. Men, women and children from the Democratic
Republic of Congo, Malawi, Mozambique and Zambia are
trafficked through Zimbabwe en route to South Africa. A small
number of South African girls are trafficked to Zimbabwe for
forced domestic labor. Trafficking also occurs within the
country's borders. Young men and women and children in rural
areas are trafficked to farms for agricultural labor and
domestic servitude or to cities and towns for commercial
sexual exploitation and domestic servitude.

(SBU) There are no reliable statistics on the trafficking
problem in Zimbabwe. Most information on trafficking comes
from anecdotal reporting supplied by the nongovernmental
organizations (NGOs) and international organizations (IOs)
providing assistance to victims and vulnerable populations.
The International Organization for Migration (IOM) and UNICEF
are currently conducting a study expected to be completed in
April on child trafficking in Zimbabwe to gauge the scale of
the problem and identify target areas for anti-trafficking
programs. IOM also expects to complete a five-country
(Zimbabwe, Zambia, Angola, Namibia and Botswana) regional
study on trafficking in July. In October 2007, the Ministry
of Public Service, Labor and Social Welfare in collaboration
with the International Labor Organization (ILO), United
Nations Development Program (UNDP), United Nations
Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO),
UNICEF and IOM launched a multi-year program on the
Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labor in Zimbabwe.
This program will address child labor issues and the
implementation of ILO Convention 182, including identifying
the worst forms of child labor in Zimbabwe and implementing
activities pertaining to the prevention of child labor,
protection of working children, rehabilitation of victims and
income generating measures. The three above mentioned efforts
were supposed to have been completed in 2007; however,
negotiations with the government over permits delayed the
start dates.

-- 27 B. (SBU) The trafficking problem in the country is
worsening as more of the population is made vulnerable by
declining socio-economic conditions. During the reporting
period, there have been reports that illegal migration of
Zimbabweans to surrounding countries has increased
significantly -- putting more Zimbabweans at risk for
exploitation. Although the government continues to show some
political will and interest in combating trafficking, a
severe lack of resources and a recent three-month strike by
prosecutors and magistrates has constrained its ability to
address the trafficking problem in practice. The government's
most notable achievements during the reporting period
included the following:

-- In January, the government announced that a memorandum of
understanding had been signed with the South African
Government (SAG) for a joint project aimed at regularizing
the status of illegal Zimbabwean migrant farm workers in the
Limpopo Province in South Africa along the border with
Zimbabwe. Once the agreement is finalized, a Labor Center
will be opened at the Beitbridge Reception Center in
Beitbridge, Zimbabwe on the border with South Africa. The
Labor Center will match Zimbabwean farm workers with South
African farms in need of labor and ensure that proper
employment conditions exist. In the beginning, the pilot
program will be confined to the Limpopo Province and will be
extended to other sectors and areas in South Africa depending
on its success.

-- The government also allocated land to IOM to establish a
reception center for Zimbabweans deported from Botswana to
Plumtree, Zimbabwe, which is due to open in April, 2008. IOM
anticipates that this second reception center in Zimbabwe
will help identify additional trafficking victims.

-- In July 2007, President Mugabe announced plans to ratify
the UN Trafficking Protocol.

(SBU) Women and young girls are the most at-risk group for
trafficking. The use of child labor, especially as farm
workers or domestic servants, is common in Zimbabwe, often
with the complicity of family members. The Child Protection
Society, a local child welfare NGO, reported that an
increasing number of children were leaving school because
their families could not afford rising school fees. Girls
were more likely than boys to drop out because they were more
readily employable as domestic workers. The South Africa
Women's Institute of Migration Affairs (SAWIMA), a South
Africa-based NGO, reported a rising number of Zimbabwean
children who could no longer afford school fees were entering
South Africa illegally where they ended up as child labor
working for little or no pay. In many cases, the children
traded sex with guides or truck drivers to be smuggled across
the border. The Girl Child Network, a local child welfare
NGO, reported that young Zimbabwean girls were recruited into
brothels in Plumtree, Zimbabwe located near the border with
Botswana. The Progressive Teachers' Union of Zimbabwe (PTUZ)
reported that at least 25,000 Zimbabwean teachers had left
the country in recent years to seek better opportunities.
Many find employment as teachers in surrounding countries;
however, others were forced into jobs on farms and in
factories for little or no pay. There also have been reports
of employers withholding their documentation under the
pretext of regularizing their status. Zimbabweans often
accept this abuse rather than report the offence to
authorities and risk deportation.

(SBU) According to anecdotal reports, traffickers are
typically independent business people who are part of small
networks of local criminal groups that facilitate trafficking
within Zimbabwe, as well as into South Africa or other
surrounding countries. In many cases, a trafficker approaches
a potential victim with the offer of a lucrative job in
another part of the country or in a neighboring country.
Traffickers often transport victims covertly across borders
at unrecognized border crossing points or bribe an
immigration officer for entry. Many young men and boys are
exploited by guides when they attempt to cross the border
illegally into South Africa or another neighboring country to
find work.

-- 27 C. (SBU) The government established in 2006 an
inter-ministerial taskforce on trafficking, which includes
representatives from the Ministries of Home Affairs, Justice,
Information, Parliamentarian Affairs, Foreign Affairs, and
Public Service, Labor and Social Welfare. Under the Ministry
of Home Affairs, the Victim Friendly Unit (VFU) of the
Zimbabwe Republic Police (ZRP) deals with children's and
sexual abuse cases, and has the lead on investigation and
tracking of trafficking cases and the referral of victims to
support services. The Interpol National Central Bureau (NCB)
Zimbabwe office has a "Human Trafficking Desk" staffed by ZRP
detectives who coordinate Zimbabwe's involvement in
international trafficking investigations. The Department of
Immigration (in the Ministry of Home Affairs) monitors
borders and ports of entry for possible traffickers and
victims. The Department of Social Welfare (in the Ministry of
Public Service, Labor and Social Welfare) also has several
programs for vulnerable children. The Ministry of Information
collaborates on awareness campaigns funded by NGOs and IOs.

-- 27 D. (SBU) A severe lack of financial resources and
hyperinflationary conditions limit the government's ability
to address the trafficking problem in practice. Police lack
the resources, including manpower and fuel, to properly
investigate trafficking cases. A three-month strike by
prosecutors and magistrates throughout the country further
strained an already overwhelmed judicial system in which
pre-trial detainees can wait prolonged periods before
receiving a hearing in court. The Department of Social
Welfare lacks the necessary funding to properly assist
victims; however, it routinely refers victims to NGOs and IOs
for such services.

-- 27 E. (SBU) The government does not have the resources to
systematically monitor its anti-trafficking efforts and
periodically make available, publicly or privately and
directly or through regional/international organizations,
assessments of its anti-trafficking efforts.

--------------------------------------------
INVESTIGATION AND PROSECUTION OF TRAFFICKERS
--------------------------------------------

-- 28 A. (SBU) Zimbabwean law does not specifically prohibit
trafficking. Trafficking-related crimes are currently
addressed under other legislation, primarily the Criminal Law
(Codification and Reform) Act, the Immigration Act and the
Labor Relations Amendment Act. These laws criminalize
transporting people across the border for sex, corruption of
children and allowing children to reside in or to frequent a
brothel, allowing children to consort with or be employed by
prostitutes, and forgery of travel documents. In addition,
the Criminal Law Act prohibits abduction and the pledging of
a female. The constitution and labor law provide that no one
may be held in slavery or servitude or be made to perform
forced or compulsory labor. Zimbabwean legal experts consider
these laws sufficient to cover both internal and external
forms of trafficking for sexual exploitation. Additionally, a
victim can bring a civil suit against a trafficker under
current law. The Criminal Procedure and Evidence Act provides
for victim restitution and compensation. The government
reported last year that it had drafted comprehensive
trafficking legislation; however, the draft has not been made
available for review nor introduced in Parliament.

-- 28 B. (SBU) In terms of sexual exploitation offenses, the
Criminal Law Act provides for the following:

-- Procuring another person for unlawful sexual conduct, or
to become a prostitute whether inside or outside Zimbabwe, or
to leave his or her usual place of residence to become an
inmate or frequent a brothel is punishable by a fine, a
maximum imprisonment of two years (10 years if the person
procured is under 16 years of age), or both.

-- Coercing or inducing another person to engage in unlawful
sexual conduct with another person by threat or intimidation
is punishable by a fine, a maximum imprisonment of five
years, or both.

-- Detaining a person in a brothel or any other premises with
the intention that the detained person should engage in
unlawful sexual conduct is punishable by a fine, a maximum
imprisonment of one year, or both.

-- Allowing a person under 16 years of age to knowingly enter
an establishment for the purpose of engaging in unlawful
sexual conduct is punishable by a fine, a maximum
imprisonment of seven years, or both. If the person is below
the age of 12, the act is punishable by a fine, a maximum
imprisonment of 10 years, or both.

-- A parent allowing a child under 18 years of age to become
a prostitute is punishable by a fine, a maximum imprisonment
of 10 years, or both.

-- Living off or facilitating prostitution is punishable by a
fine, a maximum imprisonment of two years, or both.

-- Solicitation of another person for prostitution is
punishable by a fine, a maximum imprisonment of six months,
or both.

-- Sexual intercourse or performing indecent acts with a
person under 16 years of age is punishable by a fine, a
maximum imprisonment of 10 years, or both.

-- Pledging a female person for a forced marriage or to
compensate for the death of a relative, or any debt or
obligation, is punishable by a fine, a maximum imprisonment
of two years, or both. Any party to the marriage or
arrangement may be charged as an accomplice.

-- Forgery of a public document or corruptly using a false
document is punishable by a fine, a maximum imprisonment of
20 years, or both.

-- 28 C. (SBU) In terms of labor trafficking offenses, the
Labor Relations Amendment Act provides for the following:

-- Failure of an employer to protect employees' right to fair
labor standards (including to pay any employee a wage lower
than a prescribed minimum, to require an employee to work
more than the maximum hours permitted by law, or to require
any employee to work under any conditions or situation which
are below prescribed standards) is punishable by a fine, a
maximum imprisonment of two years, or both.

-- Forced labor is punishable by a fine, two years
imprisonment, or both.

-- Employment of a person under 15 years of age (unless as an
apprentice who is over 13 years of age) is punishable by a
fine, two years imprisonment, or both.

(SBU) The Labor Relations Amendment Act does not specifically
include provisions for criminal punishment of labor
recruiters who engage in recruitment of laborers using
knowingly fraudulent or deceptive offers; for employers or
labor agents who confiscate workers' passports or travel
documents, switch contracts without the worker's consent as a
means to keep the worker in a state of service, or withhold
payment of salaries as means of keeping the worker in a state
of service. However, prosecutors may be able to use the fair
labor standards provisions in the Labor Relations Amendment
Act to pursue cases involving such activities.

(SBU) Zimbabwe does not have specific laws that criminalize
the acts of labor recruiters who recruit laborers using
knowingly fraudulent or deceptive offers or impose on
recruited laborers inappropriately high or illegal fees or
commissions that create a debt bondage condition for the
laborer. The constitution and labor law, however, provide
that no one may be held in slavery or servitude or be made to
perform forced or compulsory labor. There have not been
reports of convictions for labor trafficking offenses during
the reporting period.

-- 28 D. (SBU) Rape and aggravated indecent assault are
punishable by life imprisonment. Incarceration is mandatory
for convictions for rape or forcible sexual assault, but
there is no minimum penalty. The media frequently reports on
rape cases and convictions. Sentences usually vary from four
years to fifteen years, depending on the circumstances of the
crime.

-- 28 E. (SBU) Prostitution and the activities of brothel
owner/operator, clients, pimps and enforcers are criminalized
(as defined in the Criminal Law Act.) During the year, there
have been several media reports regarding concerted efforts
by police to halt prostitution throughout the country. Police
arrested both prostitutes and clients.

-- 28 F. (SBU) The government did not prosecute any human
trafficking offenders during the reporting period; however,
three new cases involving four victims were identified and
brought under investigation. In one case, a 29-year-old
Zimbabwean woman was recruited by a trafficker with the
promise of a job in South Africa. The two crossed into South
Africa illegally at which time the trafficker seized her
national ID card and physically abused and raped her. After
arrest and deportation by South African authorities, the
victim reported her case to a protection officer at the IOM
Reception Center in Beitbridge, Zimbabwe who then alerted the
ZRP. ZRP officers contacted South African police who arrested
the trafficker. The trafficker remains in custody in South
Africa on charges of violation of migration laws and the
sexual offences act. A court case is pending.

(SBU) In the second case, a trafficker promised two young
Zimbabwean women (17- and 18-years-old) jobs in Mozambique.
The trafficker traveled with the victims and convinced a
border official to allow them to enter the country without
proper travel documents. The trafficker then forced the
victims to work in a flea market. The trafficker refused to
pay them for a month and used physical and psychological
abuse to keep them from leaving. After a month, the victims
escaped to Zimbabwe. A journalist who had attended IOM
training on trafficking interviewed the victims and referred
them to IOM who contact the Interpol National Central Bureau
(NCB) Zimbabwe office. The Interpol NCB office referred the
case to the ZRP's Victim Friendly Unit (VFU). Police arrested
the trafficker and an investigation is ongoing.

(SBU) In the third case, in February 2007, a 15-year-old
Zimbabwean girl was sent by her maternal grandmother (who
could not afford to raise her) to live with a family friend
in South Africa. The girl's father was dead and her mother
was in jail. The girl paid a taxi driver to smuggle her into
South Africa and take her to Johannesburg. Upon arrival, the
family friend introduced her to a Nigerian man who promised
to arrange for her to go to the United Kingdom for school. In
March 2007, the girl met the Nigerian at the airport where he
gave her a fake Botswanan passport and tickets and explained
she would be met by a contact upon her arrival. She was
detained by South African immigration for possessing forged
travel documents and turned over to South African police who
placed her in a children's shelter. Sometime later, the
Nigerian came to the shelter and tried to take the girl
claiming to be her father. The girl told a social worker the
Nigerian was not her father. The social worker alerted police
and contacted IOM South Africa. The girl is still in South
Africa while Zimbabwean authorities are arranging for other
family members to care for her. An investigation is ongoing.

(SBU) None of the investigations or cases reported in the
2007 TIP Report has come to completion. Resource constraints
at the ZRP and judiciary remain a severe hindrance. Police
lack human, financial and other resources to conduct proper
investigations. It is not unusual for a detainee to remain in
remand custody for several years before his/her case is heard
in court. Additionally, the backlog of cases in the courts
was made worse by a three-month strike by magistrates,
prosecutors and court staff. According to the Ministry of
Justice, the woman convicted in 2006 for procuring a person
for the purposes of prostitution is currently serving a 48
month jail sentence.

-- 28 G. (SBU) The government does not provide its own
specialized training on trafficking; however, government
officials attended 10 IOM training workshops that focused on
trafficking and how to recognize trafficking victims during
the reporting period. There were four training sessions
specifically for law enforcement, including ZRP, VFU,
magistrates, prosecutors and immigration. There were three
sessions specifically for health and social welfare workers,
including officials from Ministry of Health and Child Welfare
and Department of Social Welfare. IOM also conducted three
training sessions for local law enforcement and health and
social welfare workers in several areas known to be problem
trafficking areas.

-- 28 H. (SBU) The government does cooperate with other
governments in the investigation and prosecution of cases.
During the reporting period, Interpol NCB Zimbabwe office
cooperated on international trafficking investigations with
Interpol NCB offices in Malawi, Mozambique, South Africa,
United Kingdom and Zambia.

-- 28 I. (SBU) The Zimbabwe Extradition Act permits the
extradition of nationals, and the government has extradition
treaties with countries in the region. There have not been
reports of trafficking-related extraditions or requests of
extradition from Zimbabwe to other countries during the
reporting period.

-- 28 J. (SBU) There was no evidence of government
involvement in or tolerance of trafficking, on a local or
institutional level.

-- 28 K. (SBU) Not applicable per response to question J
above.

-- 28 L. (SBU) There have not been reported cases involving
Zimbabwean nationals deployed abroad as part of a
peacekeeping or other similar mission who engaged in or
facilitated severe forms of trafficking or who exploited
trafficking victims.

-- 28 M. (SBU) The country is not identified as a source or
destination for child sex tourism. The country's sexual
crimes laws do have extraterritorial coverage. There are no
reports of any prosecutions or convictions under the
extraterritorial provisions.

-------------------------------------
PROTECTION AND ASSISTANCE TO VICTIMS
-------------------------------------

-- 29 A. (SBU) Foreign victims of trafficking can receive
relief from deportation while receiving victim support
services and while their cases are being investigated. The
Chief of Immigration may offer a temporary employment permit
at his discretion.

-- 29 B. (SBU) Zimbabwe does have victim care facilities
which are accessible to trafficking victims, including
foreign victims. The country does not have specialized
facilities dedicated to helping victims of trafficking;
however, IOM, Girl Child Network, Oasis Trust, Musasa Project
and Save the Children Norway have developed specialized
services to assist trafficking victims in their
shelters/assistance programs. These services include shelter,
medical and psychological assistance, reintegration and
livelihood activities, and legal counseling. Funding for
these services/programs comes from international donors. The
government primarily depends on NGOs and IOs to provide
trafficking victims these services.

-- 29 C. (SBU) The government does not have the resources to
provide funding to foreign or domestic NGOs for trafficking
victim services. However, the government routinely refers
potential victims to NGOs and IOs for assistance.
Additionally, the government allocated land to IOM to
establish a reception center for Zimbabweans deported from
Botswana to Plumtree, Zimbabwe which is due to open in April.
IOM anticipates that this second reception center in Zimbabwe
will help identify additional trafficking victims.

-- 29 D. (SBU) The Department of Immigration requires all
deportees received from South Africa to attend an IOM
briefing on safe migration, which includes a discussion of
trafficking. This system will also be implemented at the new
IOM Reception Center set to open in Plumtree, Zimbabwe. The
ZRP, Department of Social Welfare and Department of
Immigration do have a mechanism for referring victims of
trafficking to victim support; however, at this time the
government primarily depends on NGOs and IOs working with
vulnerable populations and victims to identify trafficking
victims and alert authorities. During the reporting period,
four new trafficking victims were identified by IOs or NGOs.

-- 29 E. (SBU) Not applicable -- Zimbabwe does not have
legalized prostitution.

-- 29 F. (SBU) The rights of trafficking victims are
respected. Once identified as a trafficking victim, the
government usually referred the victim to an NGO or IO for
assistance in an expeditious manner.

-- 29 G. (SBU) The government encourages victims to assist in
the investigation and prosecution of traffickers; however,
the lack of resources impedes the ability of the police to
pursue many cases. The four victims identified during the
reporting period are cooperating with the investigations.
Victims may file a civil suit or seek legal action against
traffickers. The Criminal Procedure and Evidence Act provides
for victim restitution and compensation. The law does not
preclude witnesses or victims in a court case against a
former employer from seeking other employment or leaving the
country.

-- 29 H. (SBU) The Ministry of Public Service, Labor and
Social Welfare directly operates programs in three districts
to provide orphans and vulnerable children with basic food
assistance, support for school fees, counseling for
victimized children, HIV/AIDS education and medical
assistance. The government also manages a small number of
children's homes for vulnerable and orphaned children.
However, all such government services are overwhelmed and
under-funded. The government primarily depends on NGOs and
IOs to provide shelter services. Several NGOs, including
Child Protection Services, Girl Child Network and Save the
Children Norway, also manage children's shelters. IOM, Musasa
Project and Oasis Trust offer shelter services and support to
adult trafficking victims. In most cases, the shelter, health
care, counseling and reintegration services are paid for by
the NGOs and IOs. During the reporting period, these groups
provided assistance to at least 10 potential trafficking
victims.

(SBU) The Ministry of Public Service, Labor and Social
Welfare and UNICEF have agreements with 21 NGOs to advance
the National Action Plan for Orphans and Vulnerable Children
(OVC), designed to ensure that orphans and vulnerable
children were able to access education, food, health services
and birth registrations and were protected from abuse and
exploitation. During the reporting period, UNICEF reported
that the NGOs involved in the program had reached 100,000 OVC
with comprehensive support and protection. Additionally, the
Department of Social Welfare (under the Ministry of Public
Service, Labor and Social Welfare) works closely with IOM and
Save the Children Norway to provide protection for children
deported from South Africa received at the IOM Reception
Center in Beitbridge, Zimbabwe. IOM anticipates that the new
reception center in Plumtree, Zimbabwe will offer similar
services. Additionally, the district council of Beitbridge
has a dedicated child protection officer and convenes a child
protection committee.

-- 29 I. (SBU) The government does not provide its own
specialized training on trafficking; however, government
officials attended 10 IOM training workshops that focused on
trafficking and how to recognize trafficking victims during
the reporting period. The country's embassies were not
involved in any of the new cases identified during this
reporting period. However, the Interpol NCB Zimbabwe office,
the Department of Immigration and the Department of Social
Welfare were in contact with South African authorities to
coordinate victim assistance and investigations in ongoing
cases during the reporting period.

-- 29 J. (SBU) The government primarily relies on IOM and
other NGOs and IOs to provide assistance, such as medical
aid, shelter or financial help, to its nationals who are
repatriated as victims of trafficking.

-- 29 K. (SBU) IOM, UNICEF, Save the Children Norway and Save
the Children UK work with a network of local NGOs to support
trafficking victims. NGOs include Connect (training for
counselors of abuse victims), Corridors of Hope (HIV/AIDS
education and counseling), Childline (children's crisis
hotline), Streets Ahead (counseling and shelter for
children), Girl Child Network (shelter, skills building and
counseling for abused girls), Oasis Trust and Musasa Project
(shelter and counseling for domestic abuse and trafficking
victims), and The Center (counseling for HIV/AIDS patients.)
These groups reported that they generally received good
cooperation from local authorities, but that the level of
cooperation often depended on the location. In some areas,
officials were difficult to work with because they did not
understand trafficking or denied any problem existed. In
other areas, officials were very cooperative and eager to
receive training and other assistance in building capacity.
In cases involving children, the Department of Social
Welfare, Ministry of Health and Children and local child
protection committees were involved in placing the child with
family or finding a suitable solution. The government
generally ensured that victims received adequate care from
service providers.

-----------
PREVENTION
-----------

-- 30 A. (SBU) The government, including senior officials at
law enforcement, immigration and social welfare agencies,
acknowledges that trafficking is a problem in the country.
Senior government officials frequently speak out publicly
about the dangers of trafficking, illegal migration,
prostitution and exploitative labor conditions. In July 2007,
President Mugabe announced plans to ratify the UN Trafficking
Protocol. In January, the government announced the signing of
an MOU with South Africa to regularize Zimbabwe migrant farm
laborers working illegally in South Africa.

-- 30 B. (SBU) The state-run media continues to print and air
messages about the dangers of illegal migration and that warn
the public about false employment scams, underage and forced
marriages, prostitution and exploitative labor conditions.
During the year, an IOM anti-trafficking radio campaign aired
in five languages on all four government-controlled radio
stations, which broadcast the public service announcement
eight times per day during the peak migration periods. The
government radio stations are a primary source of information
throughout the country, especially in the rural areas.

-- 30 C. (SBU) The government generally has a good working
relationship with international organizations and NGOs on
trafficking-related issues. There were some delays in
receiving permission/permits to conduct trafficking-related
studies/activities, but these activities were ultimately
allowed to proceed. Unlike in previous years, there have not
been reports of government harassment of NGOs working on the
trafficking issue.

-- 30 D. (SBU) The Department of Immigration does not
currently have the ability to systematically monitor the
growing number of illegal migrants deported from South
Africa, Botswana and Zambia to effectively identify emerging
trafficking patterns. Immigration officials do screen for
potential victims; however, the government primarily depends
on IOM protection officers and in-take procedures to identify
victims.

-- 30 E. (SBU) The government has an inter-ministerial
taskforce on trafficking made up of senior government
officials; however, it still lacks a multi-agency operational
working group that can effectively combat the trafficking
problem in practice. The head of the inter-ministerial
taskforce is a senior official in the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs. In terms of specific cases, the Interpol NCB
Zimbabwe office is the point of contact for cases requiring
international cooperation, and the VFU of the ZRP serves as
the lead for cases of involving internal trafficking. The
government does have a public corruption commission, but it
is under-funded, politicized and has yet to register any
notable accomplishments.

-- 30 F. (SBU) The government does not have a national plan
of action to address trafficking in persons. IOM is currently
organizing all the NGOs and IOs that work on trafficking to
complete a resource and gap assessment exercise before
approaching the government to form a stakeholders working
group.

-- 30 G: (SBU) The state-run media continues to print and air
messages about the dangers of illegal migration and that warn
the public about false employment scams, underage and forced
marriages, prostitution and exploitative labor conditions.
During the year, an IOM anti-trafficking radio campaign aired
in five languages on all four government-controlled radio
stations, which broadcast the public service announcement
eight times per day during the peak migration periods. The
government radio stations are a primary source of information
throughout the country, especially in the rural areas. These
awareness materials and radio spots include government and
IOM contact details for victims to call for assistance or
information.

-- 30 H. (U) Not applicable.

-- 30 I. (SBU) Post does not have any information on measures
the government has adopted to ensure that its nationals who
are deployed abroad as part of a peacekeeping or other
similar mission do not engage in or facilitate severe forms
of trafficking or exploit victims of such trafficking.

-------------------
CONTACT INFORMATION
-------------------

2. (U) Post point of contact for trafficking in persons is
Scott C. Higgins; office phone 263-4-250-593, extension 321;
fax 263-4-253-000; e-mail HigginsSC@state.gov. The estimated
hours spent per officer in preparation of this report are as
follows: PolOff 40 hours, PolAsst 5 hours, PolChief 1 hour
review, DCM 1 hour review, AMB 1 hour review.

MCGEE

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Gordon Campbell: On The Current US Moves Against North Korea

If Martians visited early last week, they’d probably be scratching their heads as to why North Korea was being treated as a potential trigger for global conflict... More>>

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Gordon Campbell: On The Lessons From Corbyn’s Campaign

Leaving partisan politics aside – and ignoring Jeremy Corbyn’s sensational election campaign for a moment – it has to be said that Britain is now really up shit creek... More>>

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Another US Court: Fourth Circuit Rules Muslim Ban Discriminatory

ACLU: Step by step, point by point, the court laid out what has been clear from the start: The president promised to ban Muslims from the United States, and his executive orders are an attempt to do just that. More>>

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