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Cablegate: Eighth Annual Trafficking in Persons (Tip) Report

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RR RUEHCD RUEHGD RUEHHO RUEHMC RUEHNG RUEHNL RUEHRD RUEHRS RUEHTM
DE RUEHME #0722/01 0712219
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
R 112219Z MAR 08
FM AMEMBASSY MEXICO
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC 0868
INFO RUEHXC/ALL US CONSULATES IN MEXICO COLLECTIVE

UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 08 MEXICO 000722

SIPDIS

SENSITIVE
SIPDIS

PLEASE PASS TO BARBARA FLECK G/TIP

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: ASEC ELAB KCRM KFRD KWMN MX PHUM PREF SMIG
SUBJECT: EIGHTH ANNUAL TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS (TIP) REPORT
- MEXICO (PART 2 OF 2)

REF: A. 2006 STATE 202745
B. (B) 2007 STATE 150188
C. (C) 2008 STATE 02731


27. (SBU) QUESTION E: For countries with legalized
prostitution: does the government have a mechanism for
screening for trafficking victims among persons involved in
the legal/regulated commercial sex trade?

POST RESPONSE: One of the biggest challenges for the GOM is
to have authorities who are able to identify victims of
trafficking. Coordination continues with USG agencies in
training government officials, police and migration officials
on victim identification. USAID will start a program
sometime this year to train officials from the National
Commission on Human Rights (CNDH) on victim identification.
To date, the GOM has not established a concrete screening
method to identify trafficking victims among prostitutes.

28. (SBU) QUESTION F: Are the rights of victims respected?
Are trafficking victims detained or jailed? If detained or
jailed, for how long? Are victims fined? Are victims
prosecuted for violations of other laws, such as those
governing immigration or prostitution?

POST RESPONSE: Migrants from Central American and other
countries who travel to Mexico illegally and violate Mexican
immigration laws are usually deported within 90 days. Once
migration officials identify an illegal migrant, INM takes
them to their detention center where they conduct interviews
to see if any crime has been committed during their travel
to/through Mexico. If the migrant is identified as a victim
of trafficking, INM officials say they then turn them over to
DIF, if they are under the age of 12 or to the appropriate
Embassy or Consulate or to shelters that can support victims
of trafficking (i.e. Casa del Migrante or IOM).

Grupos Beta, a unit of INM that operates on the northern and
southern borders, is mandated to deliver aid and protection
to migrants or nationals of Mexico. In 2007, Grupos Beta
reportedly rescued 5,700 people last year along the
U.S.-Mexican border alone.

29. (SBU) QUESTION G: Does the government encourage victims
to assist in the investigation and prosecution of
trafficking? How many victims assisted in the investigation
and prosecution of traffickers during the reporting period?
May victims file civil suits or seek legal action against
traffickers? Does anyone impede victim access to such legal
redress? If a victim is a material witness in a court case
against a former employer, is the victim permitted to obtain
other employment or to leave the country pending trial
proceedings? Are there means by which a victim may obtain
restitution?

POST RESPONSE: Law enforcement and migration officials
encourage victims to cooperate with investigations; however,
victims rarely identify themselves as victims of trafficking
and often times migrants who are exploited through their
employers are afraid to tell authorities for fear
deportation. Before the passage of the new federal law,
trafficking in persons was not considered a crime, however,
many people were charged with other crimes other than
trafficking but there are investigations pending under the
new law but to date, no prosecutions have been made under the
new law.

Since 2005, the INM has identified 22 victims of trafficking
from Guatemala, Nicaragua, Argentina, Slovakia and Ecuador.
Of the 22, (81%) of the 22 were victims of sexual
exploitation and (19%) victims of labor exploitation. Five
of these were foreigners and were authorized humanitarian
visas in order for them to provide information to prosecute
traffickers and regularize their status within Mexico. The
remaining voluntarily returned to their countries with the
support from various consulates and international
organizations. Since the beginning of 2008, INM has
identified one trafficking victim from Ecuador.

30. (SBU) QUESTION H: What kind of protection is the
government able to provide for victims and witnesses? Does
it provide these protections in practice? What type of
shelter or services does the government provide? Are these
services provided directly by the government or are they
provided by NGOs or IOs funded by host government grants?
Does the government provide shelter or housing benefits to
victims or other resources to aid the victims in rebuilding
their lives? Where are child victims placed (e.g., in

MEXICO 00000722 002 OF 008


shelters, foster care, or juvenile justice detention
centers)? What is the number of victims assisted by
government-funded assistance programs during the reporting
period? What is the number of victims assisted by
government-funded assistance programs during the reporting
period? What is the number of victims assisted by non
government-funded assistance programs? What is the number of
victims that received shelter services during the reporting
period?

POST RESPONSE: Through the DIF, the government administers
assistance programs and shelters in Sonora, Tamaulipas,
Coahuila, Chihuahua and Baja California for children
repatriated to Mexico from the United States. The GOM works
closely with UNICEF (which is reportedly in the process of
compiling information on the number of children who enter
Mexico's southern border alone and also those who travel
throughout Mexico alone on their way to the U.S. The GOM is
currently working with IOM to build a shelter on the southern
border for migrants. Although IOM's shelter reportedly
provides assistance to victims of trafficking, some say the
shelter is not equipped for victims of trafficking and is
more equipped for migrants. The GOM has often referred
victims to NGOS. In January 2008, Congress approved a 7
million USD budget to construct trafficking shelters. SRE
says that they expect to use the funds to build two shelters.

31. (SBU) QUESTION I: Does the government provide any
specialized training for government officials in identifying
trafficking victims and in the provision of assistance to
trafficked victims, including the special needs of trafficked
children? Does the government provide training on
protections and assistance to its embassies and consulates in
foreign countries that are destination or transit countries?
Does it urge those embassies and consulates to develop
ongoing relationships with NGOs and IOs that serve trafficked
victims? What is the number of trafficking victims assisted
by the host government's embassies or consulates abroad
during the reporting period? Please explain the level of
assistance. For example, did the host government provide
travel documents for the victim to repatriate, did the host
government contact NGOs in either the source or destination
countries to ensure the victim received adequate assistance,
did the host government pay for the transportation home for a
victim's repatriation, etc
.

POST RESPONSE: The GOM continues to work with USAID and ICE
on training government officials in identifying trafficking
victims. CNDH expects to receive training from USG in
identifying trafficking victims with the intent to assist in
training government officials on identifying victims and
potential victims. SRE official say that they are
implementing programs to assist Mexican trafficking victims
in the U.S. and that one of their consulates in California
has established the resources to assist a TIP victim. GOM
has plans to work with their Embassies in Central America to
develop programs to assist with prevention of trafficking in
Central America. This program has not been established.

32. (SBU) QUESTION J: Does the government provide
assistance, such as medical aid, shelter, or financial help,
to its nationals who are repatriated as victims of
trafficking?

POST RESPONSE: Through the DIF, the government continues to
administer assistance programs and provide shelters for
migrants through DIF on the northern border. NGOs also
continue to provide assistance to victims of trafficking and
street children and migrants:

Alternativas Pacificas, based in Monterrey continues to
provide support for victims of trafficking. Alternativas
Pacificas is a holistic shelter model for domestic violence
victims and created a national network of shelters. Within
the past few years, the shelters have provided services to
victims of trafficking.

Casa Alianza Mexico runs a network of shelters dedicated to
street children. Most of the children are victims of
domestic violence as well as trafficking. Casa Alianza
provides comprehensive service such as food, education,
health care, religion, legal counseling, and psychological
assistance. Casa Alianza works with DIF and also receives
the cooperation of INM when assistance is needed to
repatriate undocumented migrants.

Bilateral Safety Corridor Coalition (BSCC) works on the US
and Mexican sides of the border, with offices in San Diego

MEXICO 00000722 003 OF 008


and Cancun. BSCC has launched awareness campaigns, developed
a coalition of civil society organizations to combat
trafficking, and trained Mexican law enforcement and other
officials. BSCC works closely with state-level DIF offices,
the State Commission for Human Rights and federal law
enforcement.

Casa de las Mercedes provides assistance and support to women
of all ages who live on the streets and are victims of
mistreatment, sexual abuse, and sexual exploitation. The NGO
runs a shelter in which these women and their children can
live (as long as necessary) and receive medical and
psychological attention, food, legal counseling and education.

The Casa del Migrante runs shelters in Tapachula, Ciudad
Juarez and Tijuana where they primarily attend to migrants
but also encounter TIP victims. In its Tapachula shelter,
the organization recently added a separate area dedicated for
trafficking victims. Casa del Migrante has a good
relationship with INM.

Centro de Estudios e Investigacion en Desarollo y Asistencia
Social (CEIDAS) is promoting awareness of trafficking through
the media, academic conferences, studies and other outreach
strategies. CEIDAS in partnership with the Embassy sponsored
a trip for journalists and members of civil society to travel
to Washington D.C., San Francisco and Los Angeles for a week
to study prevention, protection and prosecutions of TIP in
the U.S. in October 2007.

The Coalition Against Trafficking in Women (CATW) actively
works to raise awareness about TIP, such as on programs
designed to prevent the sexual exploitation of minors,
particularly by trying to lower the demand. CATW has trained
law enforcement officials on trafficking. CATW reports
having received funding from INMUJERES and Mexico City
Government.

Centro Integral de Atencion a la Mujer (CIAM), located in
Cancun, provides short and long term services to women
victims of domestic and sexual violence-including crisis
prevention, legal assistance, medical and psychological and
vocational counseling, and also protection. CIAM provides
services to trafficking victims, conducts anti-TIP public
awareness campaigns and works with the hotel industry and the
local government in efforts to combat trafficking.

Fundacion Infantia works with the tourism industry on
prevention of child sexual exploitation. Fundacion Infantia
works with the BSCC and the International Labor Organization
(ILO) in providing training to government entities and
schools and has worked with local DIF offices.

International Organization for Migration works extensively
with the GOM, mostly with the INM to provide training to
immigration officials on both the northern and southern
borders. The IOM works closely with Casa del Migrante in
Tapachula, Chiapas, as well as Casa de las Mercedes in Mexico
City, among many other NGOs and shelters. The INM regularly
contacts the IOM for assistance with suspected trafficking
victims. Note: The names of NGOs working with the INM with
victim protection and assistance are not/not for public
disclosure. INM reportedly assisted 38 victims of
trafficking during the reporting period. End note.

INMUJERES is also involved in anti-TIP efforts, mostly
through funding programs and it its programs to counter
violence against women and educate women on their rights.

Sin Fronteras has a good working relationship with the GOM,
particularly with the INM and the SRE's Secretariat for
Global Affairs. Sin Fronteras provides legal and social
services for migrants in Mexico, and it has been called upon
to assist the INM with providing assistance to trafficking
victims. NOTE: the names of NGOs working with the INM with
victim protection and assistance are not/not for public
disclosure. End note.


33. (SBU) QUESTION K: Which international organizations or
NGOs, if any, work with trafficking victims? What type of
services do they provide? What sort of cooperation do they
receive from local authorities? How much funding (in U.S.
Dollar Equivalent) did NGOs and international organizations
receive from the host government for victim assistance during
the reporting period? Please disaggregate funding for
prevention and public awareness efforts from victim
assistance funding. NOTE: If post reports that a government
is incapable of providing direct assistance to TIP victims,

MEXICO 00000722 004 OF 008


please assess whether the government ensures that TIP victims
receive access to adequate care from other entities.
Funding, personnel, and training constraints should be noted
if applicable. Conversely, lack of political will in a
situation where a country has adequate financial and other
resources to address the problem should be noted as well.

POST RESPONSE: Several NGOs and international organizations
work with trafficking victims. (Please see answers for
question 31)

Alternativas Pacificas, based in Monterrey continues to
provide support for victims of trafficking. Alternativas
Pacificas is a holistic shelter model for domestic violence
victims and created a national network of shelters. Within
the past few years, the shelters have provided services to
victims of trafficking.

Casa Alianza Mexico runs a network of shelters dedicated to
street children. Most of the children are victims of
domestic violence as well as trafficking. Casa Alianza
provides comprehensive service such as food, education,
health care, religion, legal counseling, and psychological
assistance. Casa Alianza works with DIF and also receives
the cooperation of INM when assistance is needed to
repatriate undocumented migrants.

Bilateral Safety Corridor Coalition (BSCC) works on the US
and Mexican sides of the border, with offices in San Diego
and Cancun. BSCC has launched awareness campaigns, developed
a coalition of civil society organizations to combat
trafficking, and trained Mexican law enforcement and other
officials. BSCC works closely with state-level DIF offices,
the State Commission for Human Rights and federal law
enforcement.

Casa de las Mercedes provides assistance and support to women
of all ages who live on the streets and are victims of
mistreatment, sexual abuse, and sexual exploitation. The NGO
runs a shelter in which these women and their children can
live (as long as necessary) and receive medical and
psychological attention, food, legal counseling and education.

The Casa del Migrante runs shelters in Tapachula, Ciudad
Juarez and Tijuana where they primarily attend to migrants
but also encounter TIP victims. In its Tapachula shelter,
the organization recently added a separate area dedicated for
trafficking victims. Casa del Migrante has a good
relationship with INM.

Centro de Estudios e Investigacion en Desarollo y Asistencia
Social (CEIDAS) is promoting awareness of trafficking through
the media, academic conferences, studies and other outreach
strategies. CEIDAS in partnership with the Embassy sponsored
a trip for journalists and members of civil society to travel
to Washington D.C., San Francisco and Los Angeles for a week
to study prevention, protection and prosecutions of TIP in
the U.S. in October 2007.

The Coalition Against Trafficking in Women (CATW) actively
works to raise awareness about TIP, such as on programs
designed to prevent the sexual exploitation of minors,
particularly by trying to lower the demand. CATW has trained
law enforcement officials on trafficking. CATW reports
having received funding from INMUJERES and Mexico City
Government.

Centro Integral de Atencion a la Mujer (CIAM), located in
Cancun, provides short and long term services to women
victims of domestic and sexual violence-including crisis
prevention, legal assistance, medical and psychological and
vocational counseling, and also protection. CIAM provides
services to trafficking victims, conducts anti-TIP public
awareness campaigns and works with the hotel industry and the
local government in efforts to combat trafficking.

Fundacion Infantia works with the tourism industry on
prevention of child sexual exploitation. Fundacion Infantia
works with the BSCC and the International Labor Organization
(ILO) in providing training to government entities and
schools and has worked with local DIF offices.

International Organization for Migration works extensively
with the GOM, mostly with the INM to provide training to
immigration officials on both the northern and southern
borders. The IOM works closely with Casa del Migrante in
Tapachula, Chiapas, as well as Casa de las Mercedes in Mexico
City, among many other NGOs and shelters. The INM regularly
contacts the IOM for assistance with suspected trafficking

MEXICO 00000722 005 OF 008


victims. Note: The names of NGOs working with the INM with
victim protection and assistance are not/not for public
disclosure. End note.

INMUJERES is also involved in anti-TIP efforts, mostly
through funding programs and it its programs to counter
violence against women and educate women on their rights.

Sin Fronteras has a good working relationship with the GOM,
particularly with the INM and the SRE's Secretariat for
Global Affairs. Sin Fronteras provides legal and social
services for migrants in Mexico, and it has been called upon
to assist the INM with providing assistance to trafficking
victims. NOTE: the names of NGOs working with the INM with
victim protection and assistance are not/not for public
disclosure. End note.

PREVENTION:
----------

34. (SBU) QUESTION A: Does the government acknowledge that
trafficking is a problem in the country? If not why not?

POST RESPONSE: The GOM recognizes it has a sex, labor and
organ trafficking problem, all of which are transnational and
domestic problems. The issue of trafficking in persons
continues to be a new issue for government officials,
non-governmental organizations and Mexican citizens. GOM
officials, National Human Rights Commission (CNDH) and human
rights groups continued to speak out against trafficking in
persons throughout the year. Thorough knowledge of the issue
remains unclear among Mexican citizens despite the GOM's
increased awareness on the subject. There still needs to be
a clear distinction between smuggling and trafficking in
persons drawn on the state and local level.

During the last year, the GOM/NGOS sponsored numerous
seminars and conferences that included panels on trafficking:


--March 2, 2007-Coordination meeting about Child Sexual
Exploitation organized by ECPAT-International.

--March-April 2007- INM organized a training seminar for
attention to victims of Child Sexual Exploitation (a total of
five sessions).

--May 17, 2007- Sensitization workshop for screenwriters and
producers of soap operas organized by "The Media Project."

--May 24, 2007- two conferences organized by International
Organization for Migration (IOM) on trafficking in persons to
mark the meeting with the network of Attention to Women
affected by the migratory phenomenon in Guadalajara.

--June 2007- IOM provide training for civil society
organizations in the states of Veracruz, Oaxaca and Puebla (a
total of 18 people).

--June 2007, IOM participated in the International Seminar on
Prevention and Sanction Trafficking in Persons organized by
the Mexican Senate and CEIDAS in order to obtain support in
approving a new federal law against trafficking.

--August 2007- IOM provided two days of training to state
government officials in Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas.

--September 26-27, 2007- IOM co-organized an international
seminar on "Trafficking of Women for Exploitation in Latin
America which took place in Tlaxcala.

--October 22-23, IOM and CNDH organized a seminar on
Migration and Human Rights in Villahermosa, Tabasco for
government officials and NGOs.

--November 2007, IOM participated in a training workshop
about trafficking in persons for officials of the state
Family Dependency agencies (DIF). At the end of the
workshop, DIF constructed a network of attention to children
who are victims of trafficking.

--February 2008- IOM participated in a meeting with the
Mexico City government for the creation of a working group
and coordination on trafficking in persons.

--February 2008- IOM organized a sensitization workshop for
municipal police in Tapachula.

CNDH plans to address university, business and union sectors

MEXICO 00000722 006 OF 008


on trafficking in persons
--------------------------------------------- --------

-- For 2008 CNDH has five forum scheduled to address
businesses, unions, religious and civil associations, and
universities with the objective to diffuse and blend national
legislation on trafficking in persons. The following five
regional forums will be conducted on coordination with the
Mexican Senate:

--Tlaxcala- February 29, 2008
--Guadalajara, Jalisco March 28, 2008
--Zacatecas- April 25, 2008
--Culiacan-Sinaloa- May 30, 2008
--Merida, Yucatan- June 27, 2008

University forums
-----------------

--University Forum (UNAM), February 26, 2008 on trafficking
in persons.

--University Forum ITESM Monterrey, March 20, 2008.

--University Forum Iberoamericana in Mexico City May 8, 2008.

--University National Forum ITESM Monterrey, September 25,
2008.

Business sector
---------------

--Regional Business Forum in Toluca, state of Mexico-
February 25, 2008.

--Regional Business Forum in Guanajuato- May 12, 2008.

--Regional Business Forum in Monterrey, Nuevo Leon- July 5,
2008.

Union/Labor sector
------------------

--Regional Forum with Unions in Merida, Yucatan-April 16,
2008.

--Regional Forum with Unions in Cuernavaca, Morelos- July 31,
2008.

--Regional forum with Unions in Veracruz- November 21, 2008.

National Forum for Agriculture workers
--------------------------------------

--National Forum for the Agricultural sector, Hermosillo,
Sonora- August 22, 2008.


Civil Society
-------------

--Forum with Domestic workers organizations- April 24, 2008.

--Forum with organizations for prostitutes- July 18, 2008.

--Forum with taxi driver organizations- October 17, 2008.

--Forum with organizations for house-maids- November 7, 2008.

--Forum with Organizations for "Fathers of the Family"-
December 11, 2008.

Government
----------

--February 26, 2008, CNDH sponsored a program with Mexico
Foreign Relation's Secretariat (SRE) to discuss the issue of
trafficking in persons and the challenges in Mexico.


In addition to the above committees, CNDH will create 10
regional committees around Mexico to address trafficking in
persons in areas where trafficking activity is the highest.
CNDH plans to establish at least one committee each month
starting February 2008. The first committee was expected to
start on February 15, 2008 in Chiapas.

35. (SBU) QUESTION B: Are there, or have there been,
government-run anti-trafficking information or education

MEXICO 00000722 007 OF 008


campaigns conducted during the reporting period? If so,
briefly describe the campaigns(s), including their objectives
and effectiveness. Please provide the number of people
reached by such awareness efforts if available. Do these
campaigns target potential trafficking victims and/or the
demand for trafficking (e.g. "clients" of prostitutes or
beneficiaries of forced labor)?

POST RESPONSE: As documented in last year's TIP report, the
GOM's anti-trafficking information and education campaigns
have focused on a National Program to Eradicate the
Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Minors. The program is
administered by the DIF and is supported by numerous
executive and legislative branch entities (STPS and the PGR),
as well as civil society groups. An NGO addressing
prevention of trafficking in persons in Mexico say the states
of Colima and Sinaloa has the best state level campaigns to
combat trafficking in persons through DIF at the state level.

36. (SBU) QUESTION C: What is the relationship between
government officials, NGOs, other relevant organizations and
other elements of civil society on the trafficking issue?

POST RESPONSE: The relationship between government
officials, NGOs, other relevant organizations and elements of
civil society on the trafficking issue varies - generally
depending on the particular government agency and whether the
relationship is at the federal or state level. The
relationship between the GOM and civil society in any context
has traditionally been tense, but in the area of trafficking
there has been significant but uneven cooperation in the last
year.

CNDH has received easy access to INM detention centers
throughout the country. However, access varies among NGOS.
For example, Sin Fronteras has no access to INM detention
centers but Casa del Migrante has full access to the
detention centers in Tapachula.

The NGO Fundacion Infantia and the International Labor
Organization (ILO) has worked with the Secretariat of Labor
(STPS), PGR, DIF and INM on public awareness campaigns to
prevent the commercial sexual exploitation of children, with
particularly good cooperation with state level DIF offices.

IOM, ILO, UNICEF, the Bilateral Security Corridor Coalition
(BSCC), Coalition Against the Trafficking of Women and
Children (CAT-W), and Fundacion Infantia have conducted
training for federal and state governmental agencies to build
capacity in victim services and to develop greater awareness
of trafficking and the harms of sexual tourism.

37. (SBU) QUESTION D: Does the government monitor
immigration and emigration patterns for evidence of
trafficking? Do law enforcement agencies screen for
potential trafficking victims along borders?

POST RESPONSE: The GOM, Migration officials, Grupos Beta,
PGR all recognize the large influx of trafficked person and
other illegal migrants entering through the southern border
with the intention of transiting Mexico en route to the U.S.,
but scare resources continue to prevent them from training
personnel to effectively screen for potential trafficking
victims. INM report that they deported approximately 50,000
aliens in 2007- the vast majority of whom were from Central
America; almost all from Central America. Human rights
organizations and International organizations say that there
was an increase of children crossing the southern border
alone often times falling prey to traffickers.

In 2007, INM authorized the issuance of nine humanitarian
visas, which are valid for one year, renewable, and granted
to victims who agree to cooperate in the prosecution of case.

In operations to secure its borders, INM nonetheless misses
significant opportunities to identify victims. The lack of
concrete training on victim identification and enough
resources to screen Central Americans traveling through
Mexico prevent official from accurately screening and
interviewing individuals to see if they are victims of
trafficking.

INM has 46 detention centers throughout Mexico and CNDH
reportedly has an office in each center. INM officials say
that when they find migrants who are within Mexico illegally,
they send them to the detention centers where they are asked
several questions to determine if the person is a victim of
trafficking. If not, INM contacts the appropriate Embassies
and Consulates in order to provide services to the illegal

MEXICO 00000722 008 OF 008


migrants. Within 90 days the migrants are usually deported
back to their home countries.

INM expects to develop identification cards to issue to
Central Americans seeking work in Mexico. The identification
card is expected to contain personal information on the
individual, including information on the employer in order to
track employers. This will also enable migration officials
to conduct periodic checks on employers to ensure that they
are abiding by proper labor standards.

One of the biggest problems in Mexico according to NGOs is
the lack of documentation and statistics on migrants and the
lack of strategies to detect victims capable of being victims
of trafficking.

There was a document published called "Labor Diversification
of Guatemalan Workers in Chiapas" this document does not
provide evidence on specific cases in Chiapas but tries to
approach the migration issue on the border region. This
study was written in 2005 and published in 2007.

38. (SBU) QUESTION E: Is there a mechanism for coordination
and communication between various agencies, internal,
international, and multilateral on trafficking-related
matters, such as a multi-agency working group or a task
force? Does the government have a trafficking in persons
working group or single point of contact? Does the
government have a public corruption task force?

POST RESPONSE: Under the new federal law an interagency
commission was created to address trafficking in persons.
This interagency group consists of all government agencies,
three civil society organizations and three academic experts.
The Interagency commission was established under the new law
in which President Calderon will appoint an official to chair
the commission. To date, President Calderon has not
appointed a chair of the commission. This commission will be
the formal mechanism to coordinate and communicate between
various agencies.

Background: In January 2005, the Trafficking in Persons
Interagency Sub-Working Group was formalized in Mexico. The
members are: SEGOB,-CISEN, SSP-PFP, STPS, SS, SEDESOL,
SECTUR, PGR, INM, INMUJERES, and SNDIF. Since 2005, SRE has
coordinated the efforts of the Sub-working group and one of
its main goals has been to push for the passage of federal
legislation on trafficking in persons.

There is no single point of contact. The lead organization
has not been named.

39. (SBU) QUESTION F: Does the government have a national
plan of action to address trafficking in persons? If so,
which agencies were involved in developing it? Were NGOs
consulted in the process? What steps has the government
taken to disseminate the action plan?

POST RESPONSE: The GOM does not have a national plan of
action to address trafficking in persons. Under the new law,
the GOM is required to create a National Plan of action.
Article 12 of the new federal law states: "The Inter-Agency
Commission shall develop the National Program to Prevent and
Punish Trafficking in Persons." Section 2 states: "Establish
prevention, protection and care campaigns for trafficking in
persons based on the principle of safeguarding human dignity
and human rights with special attention to children,
adolescents and women."

40. (SBU) QUESTION G: For all posts: As part of a new
criteria added to the TVPA's minimum standards by the 2005
TVPRA, what measures has the government taken during the
reporting period to reduce the demand for commercial sex
acts?

POST RESPONSE: See question 34 and 35.


Visit Mexico City's Classified Web Site at
http://www.state.sgov.gov/p/wha/mexicocity and the North American
Partnership Blog at http://www.intelink.gov/communities/state/nap /
GARZA

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New Zealand has congratulated the Iraqi government on the successful liberation of Mosul from ISIS after a long and hard-fought campaign. More>>

Gordon Campbell: On The Current US Moves Against North Korea

If Martians visited early last week, they’d probably be scratching their heads as to why North Korea was being treated as a potential trigger for global conflict... More>>

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Gordon Campbell: On The Lessons From Corbyn’s Campaign

Leaving partisan politics aside – and ignoring Jeremy Corbyn’s sensational election campaign for a moment – it has to be said that Britain is now really up shit creek... More>>

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Another US Court: Fourth Circuit Rules Muslim Ban Discriminatory

ACLU: Step by step, point by point, the court laid out what has been clear from the start: The president promised to ban Muslims from the United States, and his executive orders are an attempt to do just that. More>>

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