Search

 

Cablegate: Argentine Human Rights Activists Protest New Tip

VZCZCXYZ0024
OO RUEHWEB

DE RUEHBU #0438 0991905
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
O 081905Z APR 08
FM AMEMBASSY BUENOS AIRES
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC IMMEDIATE 0659
INFO RUCNMER/MERCOSUR COLLECTIVE

UNCLAS BUENOS AIRES 000438

SIPDIS

SIPDIS
SENSITIVE

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: PHUM KWMN SMIG KCRM ELAB AR
SUBJECT: ARGENTINE HUMAN RIGHTS ACTIVISTS PROTEST NEW TIP
LEGISLATION, BUT BILL TO BE PASSED SHORTLY

REF: Buenos Aires 344

1. (U) Summary: A small group of anti-trafficking and feminist
organizations gathered outside Argentina's Congress on April 3 to
protest anti-TIP legislation currently under consideration by the
Chamber of Deputies. According to NGOs, the draft bill falls short
of Argentina's international obligations under the Palermo Protocol,
as trafficking victims over the age of 18 would have to prove that
they did not consent to their trafficking and exploitation. They
argue that the new bill would make the prosecution of traffickers
and procurers more difficult. A small group of women led the
demonstration, posted signs and slogans, handed out flyers, and
promoted a petition against the draft legislation. The
demonstration was generally well received by passersby and attracted
limited media attention. Press reports and Congressional deputies
say the bill should be approved by the Chamber this week and then
move to implementation. End Summary.

2. (U) A small group of anti-trafficking protestors met in front of
Congress on April 3 to voice their opposition to a trafficking in
persons bill that was approved by the Senate in 2006 and is now
under consideration by the Chamber of Deputies, where it may go to a
plenary vote as early as April 9. The bill would criminalize TIP
and make it a federal crime, but it would also put the burden on
trafficking victims over the age of 18 to prove that they were
forced into prostitution or slavery through violence, threats, or
coercion (see reftel for Embassy reporting on the pending
legislation). According to NGOs, this would make the prosecution of
procurers and traffickers considerably more difficult. They argue
that this law presumes that victims can consent to their own
exploitation, and violates international human rights standards.

3. (U) The activists rallied instead for a law that would more
effectively condemn procurers and traffickers. In accordance with
the Palermo Protocol, the law should not distinguish between victims
under or over 18 years old. It would consider the trafficking of
persons into prostitution or other forms of slavery a crime,
regardless of the age of the victim. TIP activists argue that a law
without this distinction would more effectively protect the human
rights of trafficking victims.

4. (U) The demonstration marked the sixth anniversary of the
disappearance of trafficking victim Marita Veron, whose mther,
Susana Trimarco, won the State Department's 2007 International Women
of Courage Award for her anti-TIP efforts. The demonstration
consisted of a small group of ten to fifteen women from a variety of
human rights, anti-trafficking, and feminist organizations. These
organizations included Red NO a la Trata, INADI, and La Casa del
Encuentro. Large posters and flyers displayed photos of trafficking
victims as well as information on common misperceptions about
prostitution being a victimless crime. The slogan repeated on many
flyers was "No more women as victims of prostitution networks."

5. (U) Anti-TIP activists set up a table with a petition against
the draft legislation. Men and women of all ages signed the
petition. The protestors, using a loudspeaker, succeeded in
attracting the attention of pedestrians by playing music and making
speeches regarding trafficking victims and the new legislation. The
demonstration attracted some media attention. Throughout the
evening, two cameramen filmed the growing crowd, the numerous
posters, as well as the speakers, while a reporter interviewed some
of the activists. Press coverage of the event was limited, but
generally positive.

7. (SBU) Comment: While the bill likely to be passed by the
Argentine Congress falls short of Palermo Protocol obligations, it
marks an important step in the right direction, and will serve as a
catalyst for launching other initiatives such as the GOA's TIP
action plan that focuses on improved assistance for trafficking
victims. As one female legislator told the Ambassador April 8, this
is not a perfect bill but it will place trafficking under federal
jurisdiction and start more effective anti-trafficking efforts.
Then, she said, we can work on fixing the problems. Trafficking in
persons is an issue that Argentines, on their own, recognize as a
serious problem. Post will continue to work with the GOA, the
Legislature, and civil society to look for opportunities to revise
the pending legislation and strengthen the law through implementing
regulations. End Comment.

WAYNE

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
World Headlines

 

Werewolf: Gordon Campbell On North Korea, Neo-Nazism, And Milo

With a bit of luck the planet won’t be devastated by nuclear war in the next few days. US President Donald Trump will have begun to fixate on some other way to gratify his self-esteem – maybe by invading Venezuela or starting a war with Iran. More>>

Victory Declared: New Stabilisation Funding From NZ As Mosul Is Retaken

New Zealand has congratulated the Iraqi government on the successful liberation of Mosul from ISIS after a long and hard-fought campaign. More>>

Gordon Campbell: On The Current US Moves Against North Korea

If Martians visited early last week, they’d probably be scratching their heads as to why North Korea was being treated as a potential trigger for global conflict... More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Lessons From Corbyn’s Campaign

Leaving partisan politics aside – and ignoring Jeremy Corbyn’s sensational election campaign for a moment – it has to be said that Britain is now really up shit creek... More>>

ALSO:

Another US Court: Fourth Circuit Rules Muslim Ban Discriminatory

ACLU: Step by step, point by point, the court laid out what has been clear from the start: The president promised to ban Muslims from the United States, and his executive orders are an attempt to do just that. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 
 
  • Pacific.Scoop
  • Cafe Pacific
  • PMC