Search

 

Cablegate: Sudanese Leaders Complain About Foreign Influence

VZCZCXRO8714
PP RUEHGI RUEHMA RUEHROV
DE RUEHKH #0559 1011337
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
P 101337Z APR 08
FM AMEMBASSY KHARTOUM
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC PRIORITY 0527
INFO RUCNFUR/DARFUR COLLECTIVE
RUCNIAD/IGAD COLLECTIVE
RHMFISS/CJTF HOA

UNCLAS KHARTOUM 000559

SIPDIS

DEPT FOR AF/SPG, S/CRS
ADDIS ABABA FOR USAU
DEPT PLS PASS USAID FOR AFR/SUDAN

SENSITIVE
SIPDIS

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: PGOV PREL KPKO SOCI AU UNSC SU
SUBJECT: SUDANESE LEADERS COMPLAIN ABOUT FOREIGN INFLUENCE

REF: (A) KHARTOUM 506
(B) KHARTOUM 462

1. (SBU) Speaking at a March 31 to April 1 workshop "Foreign
Presence and its impact on National Sudanese Security" organized by
the National Assembly Committee on security and Defense, National
Intelligence and Security Services (NISS) Chief Salah Abdullah
Muhammad, aka Salah Ghosh, called on the national assembly to enact
legislation to temper the foreign presence in Sudan. During his
address, Ghosh accused Western Embassies and NGOs of "transgressing
the lines and recruiting informants to provide their embassies with
intelligence harmful to national security" and revealed unspecified
violations committed by ambassadors and instances in which western
embassies directly intervened in Sudan's internal affairs, among
other transgressions. He also charged that some journalists are
working for foreign embassies and that embassies are trying to
influence Sudanese government agencies.

2. (SBU) Ghosh further asserted that some NGOs entered Darfur with a
mandate for humanitarian relief but ultimately worked for foreign
embassies and provided them with what he claimed was false
information regarding the region. Other Sudanese speakers at the
conference included Refugees Commission Dr. Mohammed Ahmed Alagash
who warned against American and Israeli intelligence agencies
working under the guise of humanitarian agencies. He also
highlighted Sudan's history of accepting refugees and urged for
controls regulating voluntary return. Under-Secretary of the
Ministry of Labor al-Tayeb Mukhtar stated that there is a plot to
keep qualified Sudanese labor from working on public works projects
and claimed that 75 percent of the public works projects in Sudan go
to foreign companies. Ghosh also echoed this sentiment, claiming
that the foreign presence had created a redundancy of Sudanese
workers in the labor market. (Note: The labor issue of course has
nothing to do with the U.S. or the West and has more to do with
Chinese projects. End note.)

3. (SBU) Ghosh deplored the absence of national legislation not only
as a means of regulating western diplomats and NGOs, but also in
terms of empowering the government to deal with illegal migrants,
particularly those from neighboring countries. He raised the
dangers posed by the presence of illegal foreigners to the security
of Sudan, including extremist elements.

4. (SBU) Separately, Second Vice President Ali Osman Taha, speaking
in the eastern Sudan city of Gadarif on April 4, said that foreign
intelligence agencies and organizations are planning to take
advantage of the planned 2009 elections. He claimed that western
powers want "democracy without political stability" aimed at
creating conflict that leads to the destabilization of a country.
He proposed dialogue and national reconciliation to counter Western
attempts at dividing the country.

5. (SBU) DUP parliamentarian Dr. Mudawi al-Turabi told CDA Fernandez
on April 10 that Ghosh's comments were aimed at securing easy
passage of his NISS budget from the National Assembly (something we
find hard to believe) and also the latest in the Sudanese
spymaster's efforts to demonstrate his utility to his political
patrons in the National Congress Party (this is a more likely
explanation).

6. (SBU) Comment: Post agrees with observers who say that Ghosh's
statement were in response to recent reports of closer U.S.-GOS
relations (in the wake of FM Deng Alor's February trip to the U.S.)
and a warning shot to the West to watch its steps in Sudan and not
overreach. Ghosh undoubtedly wanted to reassure anti-western and
anti-U.S. elements in Sudan that he is vigilant in his relations
with the U.S. and foreigners. Vice-President Taha's statements can
also be viewed in the context of burnishing anti-West rhetoric while
trying to preserve its radical Islamist credentials among its core
supporters.

FERNANDEZ

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
World Headlines

 

Werewolf: Gordon Campbell On North Korea, Neo-Nazism, And Milo

With a bit of luck the planet won’t be devastated by nuclear war in the next few days. US President Donald Trump will have begun to fixate on some other way to gratify his self-esteem – maybe by invading Venezuela or starting a war with Iran. More>>

Victory Declared: New Stabilisation Funding From NZ As Mosul Is Retaken

New Zealand has congratulated the Iraqi government on the successful liberation of Mosul from ISIS after a long and hard-fought campaign. More>>

Gordon Campbell: On The Current US Moves Against North Korea

If Martians visited early last week, they’d probably be scratching their heads as to why North Korea was being treated as a potential trigger for global conflict... More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Lessons From Corbyn’s Campaign

Leaving partisan politics aside – and ignoring Jeremy Corbyn’s sensational election campaign for a moment – it has to be said that Britain is now really up shit creek... More>>

ALSO:

Another US Court: Fourth Circuit Rules Muslim Ban Discriminatory

ACLU: Step by step, point by point, the court laid out what has been clear from the start: The president promised to ban Muslims from the United States, and his executive orders are an attempt to do just that. More>>

ALSO: