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Cablegate: Guilty Plea in Ontario Human Trafficking Case

VZCZCXRO5525
PP RUEHGA RUEHHA RUEHQU RUEHVC
DE RUEHON #0152 1361952
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
P 151952Z MAY 08
FM AMCONSUL TORONTO
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC PRIORITY 2491
INFO RUCNCAN/ALCAN COLLECTIVE
RUEAHLC/HOMELAND SECURITY CENTER WASHDC

UNCLAS TORONTO 000152

SIPDIS
SENSITIVE

DEPARTMENT FOR G/TIP

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: KCRM PHUM PGOV CA
SUBJECT: Guilty Plea in Ontario Human Trafficking Case

Sensitive But Unclassified - Please protect accordingly.

1. (SBU) SUMMARY: On May 13, 2008, a Niagara Falls, Ontario
resident, Imrani Nakpamgi, pled guilty to two counts of human
trafficking. The guilty plea represents the first successful
prosecution under a 2005 law criminalizing certain
prostitution-related human trafficking offenses in Canada. Nakpamgi
was convicted of using intimidation and coercion to force two
underage girls to perform sex acts for money in the Greater Toronto
Area (GTA). The case is a positive signal that law enforcement
agencies and public prosecutors recognize that the sex trade may
involve human trafficking, even if in this case the victims were not
smuggled across international or internal domestic borders. END
SUMMARY.

2. (U) On May 13, 2008, a 26 year old Niagara Falls, Ontario
resident, Imrani Nakpamgi, pled guilty to two counts of human
trafficking and living off of the avails of prostitution. Nakpamgi
admitted that he used threats and intimidation to force two teenage
girls, initially aged 14 and 15 respectively, to provide
prostitution related services in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) for
C$300 per hour from 2005 to 2007.

3. (U) Nakpamgi escorted and set up appointments for the two girls
to perform sex acts for clients in various hotels in Mississauga and
Brampton over a two year period. Crown prosecutors estimate
Nakpamgi earned more than C$400,000 through the two girls, who had
both been reported missing, the older one by her family and the
younger one by Children's Aid Society. Investigators determined
that the girls' services were being advertised via the internet.
The court is scheduled to sentence Nakpamgi on May 26. We
understand that he could face a sentence of up to 14 years in
prison, or life.

4. (SBU) COMMENT: The successful human trafficking conviction is a
positive signal--after the failure of previous cases--that the new
2005 anti-trafficking laws can be an effective tool for law
enforcement and prosecutors. Our recent conversations with
Toronto-area law enforcement officers indicate that law enforcement
officials at all levels are becoming more aware of and sensitive to
the link between the sex industry and human trafficking (septel).
END COMMENT.

NAY

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