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Cablegate: Cluster Munitions: Japan Still Working Ccw And

VZCZCXRO3709
OO RUEHFK RUEHKSO RUEHNH
DE RUEHKO #1212/01 1230702
ZNY SSSSS ZZH
O 020702Z MAY 08
FM AMEMBASSY TOKYO
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC IMMEDIATE 3946
INFO RUEHXP/ALL NATO POST COLLECTIVE PRIORITY
RUEHBJ/AMEMBASSY BEIJING PRIORITY 3131
RUEHDL/AMEMBASSY DUBLIN PRIORITY 0134
RUEHMO/AMEMBASSY MOSCOW PRIORITY 2268
RUEHNY/AMEMBASSY OSLO PRIORITY 1186
RUEHUL/AMEMBASSY SEOUL PRIORITY 9148
RUEHFK/AMCONSUL FUKUOKA PRIORITY 7592
RUEHNH/AMCONSUL NAHA PRIORITY 9976
RUEHOK/AMCONSUL OSAKA KOBE PRIORITY 1271
RUEHKSO/AMCONSUL SAPPORO PRIORITY 8187
RUEHGV/USMISSION GENEVA 3307
RUEKJCS/JOINT STAFF WASHINGTON DC
RHMFISS/USFJ
RUEHNO/USMISSION USNATO 1241
RUEKJCS/SECDEF WASHDC
RHEHAAA/NSC WASHDC
RHHMUNA/HQ USPACOM HONOLULU HI
RHMFISS/COMUSKOREA SEOUL KOR
RUCNDT/USMISSION USUN NEW YORK 9642
RUEAIIA/CIA WASHDC

S E C R E T SECTION 01 OF 03 TOKYO 001212

SIPDIS

SIPDIS

E.O. 12958: DECL: 05/02/2023
TAGS: PREL MOPS PARM JA NATO
SUBJECT: CLUSTER MUNITIONS: JAPAN STILL WORKING CCW AND
OSLO PROCESS

Classified By: Charge d'affaires Joseph Donovan. Reasons 1.4 (b) and (d
).

1. (S) SUMMARY: An Oslo Process agreement that criminalizes
the possession of cluster munitions (CM) and/or penalizes
countries that support states that possess CM could block
future peacekeeping operations (PKO) and embarrass Japan
during the July G-8 Hokkaido Summit, PM Deputy Assistant
Secretary of State Ganyard told Ministry of Foreign Affairs
(MOFA) Disarmament, Non-proliferation and Science Department
Deputy Director-General Masatoshi Shimbo during an April 23
meeting in Tokyo. DDG Shimbo said Japan's policy, approved
by Prime Minister Yasuo Fukuda, is unchanged. Japan
continues to favor addressing humanitarian and
interoperability concerns within the framework of the
Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons (CCW). However,
domestic political considerations and public pressure for
faster action will keep Japan engaged in the Oslo Process.
Shimbo admitted that the current Oslo Process draft text,
which will be considered at the May Dublin conference, could
be problematic for PKOs and that Japan is working hard to
change the language. Tinkering with words would not be
sufficient, DAS Ganyard said, as he urged Japan to strengthen
its focus on the CCW. DAS Ganyard suggested Japan join the
United States in upcoming diplomatic efforts to support the
CCW. DDG Shimbo demurred, saying the current situation in
Tokyo is not yet that critical. He warned that Japan may be
forced to decide between adopting the CCW or Oslo Process
text at the end of the year. End Summary.

-------------------------------------
US: Criminalizing CM Will Affect PKO, Embarrass G-8
-------------------------------------

2. (S) An agreement in May at the Dublin meeting of the Oslo
Process that bans CM could have an embarrassing effect on the
July G-8 Summit at Hokkaido's Lake Toya, Bureau of Political
Military Affairs Deputy Assistant Secretary for Plans,
Programs and Operations Stephen T. Ganyard told MOFA
Disarmament, Non-proliferation and Science Department Deputy
Director-General Masatoshi Shimbo on April 23. G-8 nations
are the main providers of monetary, human and logistical
resources for PKO. However, criminalizing possession of CM
and/or penalizing countries that support nations that possess
CM, as called for in Articles 1(b) and 1(c) of the current
Oslo draft text, will hinder, delay or prevent State Parties
and Non-State Parties to the agreement from jointly engaging
in PKO. The draft text will also reduce the United States,
ability to protect Japan and respond to contingencies in the
Pacific. The Oslo Process, which does not include the main
CM users such as China, Russia and Pakistan, would not be as
effective in dealing with the international community's
concerns about CM as the CCW, DAS Ganyard said.

--------------------------------------
Japan Position Unchanged - Prefer CCW, Settle for Oslo
--------------------------------------

3. (S) DDG Shimbo said Japan's position, approved by Prime
Minister Yasuo Fukuda, is unchanged. Tokyo's first priority
is to reach a binding international agreement on CM within
the CCW to which all of the main producers and users of CM
would be party. However, domestic political realities are
forcing Japan to participate in the Oslo Process. The
Japanese public, media and Diet are increasingly frustrated
with the slow progress within the CCW, DDG Shimbo continued,
which is raising the pressure on Japanese government
officials to take action. Fellow members of the ruling
Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) recently grilled Foreign
Minister Masahiko Koumura during Lower House debate about
Tokyo's opposition to a CM ban. Lower House Speaker Yohei
Kono leads a new multi-party Diet committee inaugurated on
April 19 that is pushing to ban CM. Japan's Foreign and
Defense Ministers understand the logic underlying the
importance of CM but are also pragmatic when it comes to the
domestic political realities behind calls for quick action to
ban CM. (Comment: PM Fukuda's ruling LDP controls the Diet's
Lower House in coalition with the New Komeito Party, a group
with ties to a traditionally pacifist Japanese Buddhist sect.
PM Fukuda's hold on the Japanese Government is being
challenged by the opposition Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ),
which controls the Diet's Upper House.)

---------------------------------------
The Need for a Stronger Public Campaign
---------------------------------------

4. (S) Turning to the effect of a CM ban on PKO, DDG Shimbo
admitted that the current Oslo draft text could be
problematic and that Japan is pushing for changes in the
wording of Articles 1(b) and 1(c) and will continue to press
the matter with other ""Like-Minded"" nations at Dublin to the
fullest extent possible. DDG Shimbo expressed doubt that
arguments focused on PKO would sway public opinion. Instead,
Fukuda Cabinet officials would need to stress how a CM ban
would reduce the ability of Japan's Self Defense Forces and
U.S. Forces in Japan (USFJ) to defend Japan in order to
convince the Diet and Japanese public about the importance of
CM. MOFA and Ministry of Defense (MOD) officials in the
meeting expressed a strong interest in receiving additional
information from the United States that they can share with
the Diet on the role of CM in defense of Japan. DDG Shimbo
suggested that it might be time for the United States and
Japan to be more public on the issues, noting that opponents
of CM are engaging in an active public relations campaign.
Embassy Tokyo Political Officer suggested that the Embassy
and USFJ might be willing to consider a Foreign Ministry
request to coordinate on public relations and outreach
efforts with the Diet and general public. DDG Shimbo
pledged to consider providing a list of possible activities
for the U.S. Government,s consideration.

--------------------------------------
United States Will Raise Prominence of Issue
--------------------------------------

5. (S) DAS Ganyard told DDG Shimbo that simple tinkering with
the language would not be sufficient, as any ban on CM
envisioned by the Oslo Process would negatively affect
interoperability and PKOs. The United States is gearing up
for a prominent diplomatic campaign to highlight the
seriousness of the issue. The Secretary planned to write
letters to Foreign Ministers and to the UN Secretary General
asking that the UN reinforce the importance of keeping
discussion of CM within the CCW. Ambassadors in Washington
will be called in for meetings at the Under Secretary level.
DAS Ganyard asked that Japan also consider writing a letter
to the UN Secretary General, urging him to oppose any
agreement that would hinder, prevent or delay PKOs.

--------------------------------------
Japan May Decide Between Two Documents
--------------------------------------

6. (S) DDG Shimbo said he would consider and convey the
proposal to his superiors, but was not optimistic considering
the bipartisan domestic support for banning CM. The current
situation is not yet that critical. Although the Oslo
Process participants in Dublin may reach basic agreement on
the text, and Japan will not be in a position to object, the
text will not be formally adopted and would not be binding.
In the meantime, negotiations in the CCW will continue. The
real turning point will be at the end of 2008, when Japan may
be forced decide between the CCW and Oslo Process texts. At
that time Japan will need to balance its national interests
and relations with important allies to decide one or the
other. For now, Japan is making every effort to strengthen
the CCW and to modify the Oslo Process text to mitigate any
potential harmful affects on interoperability, DDG Shimbo
concluded.

7. (U) Principal Deputy Coordinator for Reconstruction and
Stabilization Mark Asquino, USFJ representatives J-5 COL
Born, J-5 LTC Hague, and Embassy Tokyo officers accompanied
DAS Ganyard. MOFA and MOD Japan personnel joined DDG Shimbo.

8. (U) This cable as been approved by DAS Ganyard.
DONOVAN

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