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Cablegate: Oas Regional Seminar On Implementing Unscr 1540,

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DE RUEHBU #0793/01 1621751
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
R 101751Z JUN 08
FM AMEMBASSY BUENOS AIRES
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC 1293
INFO RUCNMRC/WESTERN HEMISPHERIC AFFAIRS DIPL POSTS
RUEAIIA/CIA WASHINGTON DC
RUCNDT/USMISSION USUN NEW YORK 0213
RHMFIUU/DEPT OF ENERGY WASHINGTON DC
RHEFDIA/DIA WASHINGTON DC

UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 09 BUENOS AIRES 000793

SIPDIS

FOR WHA, IO, AND ISN/CPI

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: PREL AORC KPAO PTER UNSC KNNP AR
SUBJECT: OAS REGIONAL SEMINAR ON IMPLEMENTING UNSCR 1540,
BUENOS AIRES, MAY 13-14, 2008

REF: GABORONE 01450

-------
Summary
-------

1. A regional workshop on the implementation of UN Security
Council Resolution 1540, which concerns non-proliferation and
export control obligations, was co-hosted by the U.S. and
Argentina and held in Buenos Aires, Argentina from May 13-14,
2008. All members of the Organization of American States
were invited. Participants, listed in paragraph 12, included
seventy-seven senior and mid-level government officials
involved in reporting or implementing provisions of
Resolution 1540. The program offered participants the
opportunity to discuss issues with UN 1540 Committee members
as well as discuss problems and strategies of meeting country
obligations required by the agreement. In addition, the
group discussed the recently passed UNSCR resolution 1810,
which provides additional guidance on implementing national
action plans related to nonproliferation and export control.
End Summary.

-----------------------------------
UNSCR 1540 Compliance in the Region
-----------------------------------

2. The workshop was primarily intended for the states of
North and South America as well as the Caribbean to discuss
UN Resolution 1540 reporting status and the development of
national action plans. Delegates initially discussed
problems and lessons learned in using the UN 1540 Committee
provided matrix (a self-assessment tool) as part of the
reporting process. Overall, as a region, the OAS states have
been responsive to the UN and have submitted their initial UN
1540 reports. However, many countries noted that although
their reports stated they were &in full 1540 compliance,8
the breadth and scope of functional areas to be addressed was
potentially overwhelming. There was consensus that all
states need a central point of contact or coordinator and
regional organizations, such as the OAS, also need
coordinators to engage with the UN 1540 Committee.
Additional objectives of the workshop included: reviewing UN
Resolution 1810 and discussing its emphasis on
implementation; discussing the role regional organizations
will play as they assist members to achieve full 1540
compliance; analyzing donor country technical assistance
programs (e.g. EXBS); reviewing the UN 1540 Committee
assistance request form, and debating next steps.

3. Participants included senior policy representatives from
19 OAS states as well as policy and technical officials from
the OAS, UN 1540 Committee and Committee Panel of Experts, UN
Office of Disarmament Affairs (UN ODA), Organization for
Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE), Organization for
the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), Missile
Technology Control Regime (MTCR), and INTERPOL. In addition,
24 local Argentine officials from various export control and
nonproliferation ministries attended the program (see para 12
for full participant list). In the spirit of open and
honest discussion, it became apparent during the working
group sessions that although all OAS countries have reported
to the UN 1540 Committee that their states are in &full
compliance with the reporting obligation,8 many smaller
states do not have a complete understanding of their
implementation obligations. The basic problem is that those
states cannot get their senior policymakers to focus on WMD
proliferation as a threat, and they will need assistance in
developing, then executing national implementation plans.

4. Two major points that emerged from the presentations by
delegates who have been involved in their country,s
reporting or implementation were: interagency cooperation and
information sharing is essential, and regional events and
training by IGOs is important in preventing a &weak link8
in hemispheric security. As an example of the first point,
Canadian delegate Thomas Blackmore pointed out that in many
customs organizations there may be programs that meet or
assist 1540 requirements. That 1540 coordinators within
states are unaware of such assets may actually lead to
under-reporting on compliance. The second point was that it
was important to continue regional events so that smaller
countries, which may have gaps in their programs, do not fall
further behind. Those countries do not want to become the
&weakest link8 in the chain of hemispheric security and
become a target or terrorists to exploit.

BUENOS AIR 00000793 002 OF 009


------------
The OAS Role
------------

5. During the wrap-up session, the three moderators, Thomas
Wuchte (U.S. Department of State), Carlos Hernandez
(Argentine MFA), and Gonzalo Talavera (Peru OAS
Representative), assured the delegates that their points were
heard and understood, and that the Committee on Hemispheric
Security within the OAS, chaired by Ambassador Izben Williams
(Nevis and St. Kitts), would take an active role coordinating
assistance requested by states. Ambassador Williams called
for a meeting between his Committee and the UN 1540
Committee, to analyze the gaps, both national and regional,
and set assistance priorities based on an analysis of the
reporting and assistance requests received by the Committee.

--------------------
Delegate Conclusions
--------------------


6. Other highlights of the program included:

-- The UN 1540 Committee will specifically seek to cooperate
with regional groups such as the OAS;
-- States can share lessons learned, gap analyses, national
implementation plans and frameworks, and specific
implementation methodologies though the UN 1540 Committee and
where appropriate on the UN 1540 Website;
-- A review of UN Resolution 1810, as a follow-up to UN 1673
emphasizes a shift from reporting to national implementation
plans;
-- States should customize their national implementation
plans based on their national capacity and priorities;
-- A 1540 Report on Implementation is under development; and
-- Regimes and IGOs need to provide technical assistance at
the national and regional level.

------------------------
Delegate Recommendations
------------------------

7. Based on statements from delegates of the Caribbean
countries regarding the gaps that exist between the reports
and the actual state of implementation, a priority need for
the CARICOM countries is technical assistance and training on
developing a national export control/nonproliferation law.
UN resolution 1540 requires signatories to establish legal
prohibitions to form the foundation of their national
systems. On the margins, delegate Bernadette Butler
(Bahamas) suggested this could be accomplished regionally
through the Commonwealth,s organization. A second priority
would be to analyze the requests for assistance that come to
the UN 1540 Committee and prioritize requests made by OAS
member states. Working with Ambassador Williams and the
Committee on Hemispheric Security, some technical assistance
and training programs could be delivered regionally instead
of bilaterally thereby optimizing the use of assistance
funds. Finally ( MERCUSOR will hold internal discussions in
mid-June and Post is following up to attend as an observer.

--------------
Nuts and Bolts
--------------

8. The workshop was organized into four parts: an opening
plenary session, followed by three working sessions led by a
moderator. The plenary session was opened by Ambassador Raul
Ricardes of Argentina, who thanked all the delegates for
their participation in the important job of preventing the
proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and fighting
terrorism. He noted that Argentina was a target of terrorist
attacks in 1992 and 1994 and that no country is immune from
the actions of these non-state actors. Ambassador Ricardes
was followed by U.S. Ambassador Earl Anthony Wayne, who
reminded delegates that UNSCR 1540 was a vital element in
combating non-proliferation. Wayne remarked that the U.S.
has been working with Argentina and many other nations for
many years to combat the spread of WMD and terrorism and this
workshop was part of those continuing efforts. Ambassador
Wayne encouraged the delegates to share their success stories
and learn from each other on ways to implement the
resolution.

9. Dr. Izben Williams, Ambassador from St. Kitts and Nevis

BUENOS AIR 00000793 003 OF 009


and Chair of the Committee of Hemispheric Security of the OAS
delivered the keynote address. Ambassador Williams
reaffirmed that the OAS considered implementation of 1540
fundamentally important to hemispheric security. Ambassador
Williams reviewed the history of resolutions adopted by the
General Assembly of the OAS related to non-proliferation and
noted several resolutions related to nonproliferation will be
adopted by the Assembly next month (June 2008). He
recognized that clear gaps still persist "between the global
consensus with regard to the threat of WMD proliferation, and
national capacities and sometime willingness to take
decisive, concrete actions to address such threats."
Ambassador Williams reminded delegates that to meet their
obligations under the resolution, states must take
significant measures which must include: the establishment of
legal prohibitions; implementing systems to account for,
secure and physically protect sensitive materials, and
develop appropriate and effective border and trade controls.
Based on the extension of 1540 by UN resolution 1810,
Ambassador Williams encouraged the UNSCR 1540 Committee to
assess the submitted reports, identify gaps in state's
capacities as well as regional deficiencies, and prioritize
steps that states should take to meet their commitments. In
conclusion, Ambassador Williams recommended that UN 1540
Committee members should meet with the OAS Hemispheric
Security Committee to rationalize and coordinate assistance
projects to focus on priority gaps.

10. The plenary session was followed by three working
sessions each with a moderator and several panelists.
Working Session I was entitled &Key Elements of the 1540
Resolution ad Overview of the Current Regional
Implementation Stage8 and was chaired by Carlos Hernandez of
the Argentine MFA. Panelists provided a series of
presentations on reports filed to date with the UNSCR 1540
Committee and what the roles other IGOs are playing to assist
states with 1540 implementation. Hamilton O,Neil, the
delegate from Jamaica, forcefully stated that before the
group started a discussion of implementation plans, delegates
should recognize that in the smaller countries of CARICOM,
basic awareness training, particularly for high level policy
makers was still needed.

Working Session II was entitled &National Implementation
Plans8 and was moderated by Thomas Wuchte (U.S. State 1540
Coordinator). A series of panelists described methodologies
they had used within their country or organization to
establish a framework for an implementation plan. Two
delegates described the difficulties of assessing all the
functions various agencies perform related to 1540 and the
importance of good interagency cooperation. There was
consensus that each country needed a focal point or national
coordinator for 1540 activities.
Working Session III was moderated by Gonzalo Talavera (Peru
MFA-OAS Representative) and continued the theme of national
implementation plans. A series of delegates gave statements
regarding their country,s implementation of action plans.
Nils Johanson, U.S. State ISN/ECC described technical
assistance that could be offered by the State through the
Export Control and Border Security Program (EXBS) Delegates
from the UN 1540 Committee reiterated their intent to help
all states with advice and technical assistance for those
that require it.

------------
Participants
------------

12. List of Participants:

UNITED STATES:
Department of State
Wuchte, Thomas
Senior Advisor and U.S. 1540 Coordinator
(1-202) 736-4275; (1-202) 647-4467
WuchteTA@state.gov
Johanson, Nils
Export Control and Related Border Security (EXBS) Program
Officer
International Security Non-proliferation Office of Export
Controls Cooperation
(1-202) 647-3526
JohansonNP@state.gov

Schandlbauer, Alfred
United States Embassy in Argentina

BUENOS AIR 00000793 004 OF 009


5777-4533
ARGENTINA:
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Kelly, Elsa
Ambassador ) Office of International Security, Nuclear and
Space
Affairs
4819-7830

Bocalandro, Ricardo
Secretary ) Office of International Security, Nuclear and
Space Affairs
4819-7830
rlb@mrecic.gov.ar

Hernndez, Carlos
Secretary - Office of International Security, Nuclear and
Space Affairs
4819-7837
cah@mrecic.gov.ar

Raiola, Silvia
Adviser ) Office of International Security, Nuclear and
Space Affairs
4819-7831
sar@mrecic.gov.ar

Buis, Emiliano
Legal Adviser - Office of International Security, Nuclear and
Space Affairs
4819-7832
ejb@mrecic.gov.ar

Pagola, Mara Victoria
Expert ) Office of International Security, Nuclear and Space
Affairs.
4819-7830
pmv@mrecic.gov.ar


Ministry of Defense
Carranza, Susana Beatriz
Expert in Political Science
4346-8800 int. 8174
suscar@mindef.gov.ar

Office of the President
Cucovaz, Silvia Beatriz
Representative
4812-4930; 4812-4930
eni2006@gmail.com

Maruyama, Ana
Pharmaceutical
4343-5531 int. 1274
anammaruyama@yahoo.com.ar

Scientific and Technical Defense research Institute (CITEFA)
Blejman, Alicia Graciela
Director of Research
4709-1228

Bernacchi, Adriana
Dr. in Biological Science
Biro of International Agreements, Management of Research
4709-8229
abernacchi@citefa.gov.ar

Valles, Edith
Dr. in Veterinarian Science
Biro of International Agreements, Management of Research
Professional assistant
4709-8229
evalles@citefa.gov.ar

Abragun, Mara Brbara
babraguin@citefa.gov.ar

National Arms Registry (RENAR)
Siderakis, Anastasio
Head of Cabinet of Advisers
4371-8989
siderakisa@renar.gov.ar

National Gendarmerie of Argentina
Leiva, Gonzalo Javier

BUENOS AIR 00000793 005 OF 009


Superior technician in Criminology
Cell: 15-3200-0288
gonzalo-gna@yahoo.com

Romero, Eduardo Amadeo
Biochemist
4310-3699; 4310-2589
romero41@gmail.com

Galvn Batista, Ftima
First corporal
Cell: 15-6960-9918
4338-6498
fgalvan-batista@yahoo.com.ar

Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN)
Solmesky, Sergio
Engineer, Unit of Institutional Information
6323-1307/51
ssolmesky@sede.arn.gov.ar

Terigi, Gabriel
Assistant Director of Institutional Communication
6323-1377
gterigi@sede.arn.gov.ar

Fernndez Moreno, Sonia
Director of Nuclear Affairs and Institutional Communication
6323-1357
sfmoreno@sede.arn.gov.ar

lvarez Vicente, Agustina
Assistant Director for Nuclear Affairs
6323-1704
aavicent@sede.arn.gov.ar

Acosta, Gabriela Mara
Assistant Director for Nuclear Affairs
Cell: 15-6197-3981 / 6323-1371
gacosta@sede.arn.gov.ar

Sayan, Julieta
Expert in Political Science
Unit of Institutional Information
6323-1307
jsayan@sede.arn.gov.ar

National Commission for Atomic Energy (CNEA)
Cancio, Rubn
Engineer
4704-1085
cancio@cnea.gov.ar

Cinat, Enrique
Chemical Engineer
6772-7826
cinta@cnea.gov.ar

Deluchi, Facundo
Expert International Relations
4704-1226
deluchi@cnea.gov.ar

Winsnes, Federico Bernardo
Lawyer
4704-1496
winsnes@cnea.gov.ar

Argentina Chamber of Exporters (CERA)
Giordano, Rubn Enrique
Director CERA
4394-4482; 43394-1003
contacto@cera.org.ar

Maritime Prefecture of Argentina
Pellegrino, Rogelio Gustavo
Prefect
4318-7488; 4314-6234
rpellegrino@prefecturanaval.gov.ar

Chesini, Vctor Daniel
Prefect
4314-1278
infopna1@prefecturanaval.gov.ar

Bagini, Mariana Herminia

BUENOS AIR 00000793 006 OF 009


Principal Officer
4318-7551; 4314-6234
dic@prefecturanaval.gov.ar

General Customs Directorate
Bayoni, Fernando Pablo
Representative
4338-6440; 4338-6772
fbayoni@afip.gov.ar

Pizzuto, Vilma Susana
Representative
4338-7678; 4338-7663; 4338-7678
vpizzuto@afip.gov.ar

National Commission for Special Activities (CONAE)
Hernndez, Ana Mara
Dr. Physics Science
4331-0074 int. 206; 4331-0189
anamaria@conae.gov.ar

Biro of Internal Affairs
Romero, Noelia Paola
Lawyer
Cell: 15-6544-6738; 4943-9883; 4943-9730
npr@dic.gov.ar

Mascialino, Damiana
Expert in Political Science
4943-9715
dam@dic.gov.ar

BAHAMAS
Butler, Bernadette
Chief Counsel ) Office of the Attorney General and Ministry
of Legal Affairs
(242) 502-9560; (242) 356-4179
bernadettebutler@hotmail.com

BARBADOS
Dowridge, David A.
Commander ) Barbados Defense Force
(246) 436 6182
dowridge.d@bdf.gov.bb

BOLIVIA
Roca Kikunaga, Zoilo
Military Attach
Embassy of Bolivia in Argentina
4393-1664
Zroca55@hotmail.com

BRASIL
Frazao Araujo, Sergio Antonio
General Coordinator for Sensitive Goods
Ministry of Science and Technology
(55) 61 34 11 56 00
sfrazao@mtc.gov.gr

Monteiro De Carvalho Junior, Osvaldo
Consultant for Nuclear Technology and Export Control
Ministry of Science and Technology
(55) 61 3411 5153
omonteiro@mtc.gov.br

Gallinal Cuenca, Carlos Fernando
Head of Department for Defense and International Security
Embassy of Brazil in Argentina
4515-2477
ccuenca@embrasil.org.ar

Poggio Padua, Thiago
Department for Defense and International Security
Embassy of Brazil in Argentina
4515-2476
tpoggio@embrasil.org.ar

Montenegro, Manuel
First Secretary
Embassy of Brazil in Argentina
4515-2477
mmontenegro@embrasil.or.ar

CANADA
Blackmore, Michael
Senior Policy Officer

BUENOS AIR 00000793 007 OF 009


Department of Foreign Affairs & International Trade
(613) 944-5389
michael.blackmore@international.gc.ca

CHILE
Capdevila, Jos
Political Adviser
Embassy of Chile in Argentina
4050-8290
jmcapdevila@embajadadechile.com.ar

Rodrguez, Mara Luisa
Analist
Department of Special Politics,
Subdivision of International Security and Disarmament
Ministry of Foreign Affairs Chile
(56 2) 8274390
mlrodriguez@minrel.gov.cl

COLOMBIA
Restrepo Hurtado, lvaro
Embassy Adviser
Embassy of Colombia in Argentina
4325-0258
alvarorestrepo@embajadacolombia.int.ar

ECUADOR
Maldonado Robles, Jorge
Secretary
Embassy of Ecuador in Argentina
4804-0073; 4804-0074
embecuador@embecuador.com.ar

EL SALVADOR
Figueroa Mata, Yohalmo
Colonel, Advisor for Security and Defense
Permanent Mission of the OAS
(1-703) 389-5553
yohafig19@yahoo.com


FINLAND
Musakka, Raisa
Intern )
Embassy of Finland in Argentina
raisa.musakka@formin.fi

HONDURAS
Valladares-Gmez, Reniery
Advisor
Mission of Honduras to the United Nations
(1- 917) 582-6776; (1-212) 752-3370
renieryv1978@yahoo.com

MEXICO
Macas Ortiz, Teresita
Officer
Center for Investigations and National Security (CISEN)
(52) 55 562443700 int. 2060
teremacias@entermas.net

De la Torre Galindo, Francisco
Head of Political Section
Embassy of Mexico in Argentina
4118-8823
fdelatorre@embamex.int.ar

NICARAGUA
Castillo Salaverry, Rodrigo
General Director for Defense Policies
Ministry of Defense
(505) 222-4256
rcastillo@mindef.gov.ni

PARAGUAY
Flores Servn, Elio Antonio
Cnel. DEM (Diplomat Colonel of Headquarters)
Military and Defense Attach
Embassy of Paraguay in Argentina
002 54 11 48020981; 002 54 1566617592
agregadomilitardelpy@hotmail.com

PERU
Lpez Chavarri, Mario
Secretary SDR
Embassy of Peru in Argentina

BUENOS AIR 00000793 008 OF 009


48022000 int. 102
embperucancilleria@arnet.com.ar

Campos Fernndez, Mnica
Second Secretary SDR
Embassy of Peru in Argentina
48022000 int. 108
caetana64@hotmail.com; mcampos@embajadadelperu.com.ar

Talavera lvarez, Gonzalo
Alternate Representative
Permanent Mission of Peru to the OAS
(1-202) 232-2281
gtalavera@peruoas.org

ST. KITTS & NEVIS
Dr. Williams, Izben C.
Ambassador of St. Kitts & Nevis to the Organization of
American States (OAS)
The United States Chair, Committee of Hemispheric Security of
the OAS
(1- 202) 686-2636
amb@embskn.com; ja@embskn.com gailgilbert@embskn.com
TRINIDAD Y TOBAGO
Bridgewater, Claude
Commanding Officer
1st Engineer Battalion
Major ) Trinidad y Tobago Defense Force
(1-868) 667-8301
claude.bridgewater@ttdf.mil.tt; cebridgie@yahoo.com

VENEZUELA
Cely Noda, Alejandra
Coordinator for International Affairs
People Ministry for Foreign Affairs
Coordination of Multilateral Political Affairs
0058 212 8064310; 0058 416 6209656
aljandra.cely@mre.com.ve; alecely@yahoo.com
INTERNATIONAL GOVERNMENT ORGANIZATIONS:
UNITED NATIONS, UNSCR 1540 (United Nations Security Council
Resolution 1540)
Barra, Jos
The 1540 Committee Representative, United Nations
(1-212) 421-5420; (1-917) 250-7883
jbarria@panama-un.org
Cerini, Ana Mara
Expert, UNSCR 1540 ) Security Council
(1-917) 367-9347
cerini@un.org

Markram, Thomas
Senior Political Affairs Officer
Weapons of Mass Destruction Branch, Office for Disarmament
Affairs
(1-212) 963-0008
markram@un.org

OPCW (Organization for Prohibition of Chemical Weapons)
Paturej, Krzysztof
Director
Office of Special Projects of the Technical Secretariat
Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW)
(3170) 416 30 77
Krzysztof.Paturej@opcw.org

CARICOM (Caribbean Community)
Hamilton, O,Neil
Senior Attach
Embassy of Jamaica in the U.S.
(1-202) 329-4110
oneil.hamilton@verizon.net

MTCR (Missile Technology Control Regime)
Danellis, Eleftherios
Ambassador/ MTCR Chair
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Greece
(306) 948 949696
pmar@mfa.gr; d01@mfa.gr

OSCE (ORGANIZACION FOR SECURITY AND COOPERATION IN EUROPA)
Mor Sola, Ricardo
Permanent Representative for Political Military Affairs
Permanent Mission of Spain to OSCE, Vienna
(43) 1 505-8600-382
Ricardo.mor@maec.es


BUENOS AIR 00000793 009 OF 009


O.I.P.C. INTERPOL. (Bs. As.)
De Assis Possa, Armando
Head of Subregional Office of Interpol for South America
4346-5767
a.possa@interpol.int

Toledo, Domingo Andres
Regional Specialist Officer for the International
Organization of Criminal Police
4346-5767
a.toledo@interpol.int

13. For further information, contact U.S. 1540 Coordinator
Tom Wuchte, at 202-736-4275 or at WuchteTA@state.gov.
WAYNE

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