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Cablegate: Daily Summary of Japanese Press 07//08

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UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 10 TOKYO 001802

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E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: OIIP KMDR KPAO PGOV PINR ECON ELAB JA

SUBJECT: DAILY SUMMARY OF JAPANESE PRESS 07//08

INDEX:

(1) U.S. makes one compromise after another to North Korea; Hasty
results are fraught with danger (Nikkei)

(2) Nuclear threat to Japan -- Repercussions from North Korea's
nuclear declaration (Part 1): Impatient U.S. to delist just as DPRK
anticipated (Yomiuri)

(3) Nuclear threat to Japan -- Repercussions from Korea's nuclear
declaration (Part 2): Need for Japan to rebuild North Korea policy,
U.S. policy (Yomiuri)

(4) Dispatch of "handful of" SDF personnel to Sudan: lack of PKO
strategy (Asahi)

(5) Ozawa embarks on coordination for campaign cooperation with
other opposition parties on his nationwide tour (Yomiuri)

(6) Poll on Fukuda cabinet, political parties (Nikkei)

(7) Wiercinski becomes new commander of U.S. Army Japan at Camp Zama
(Asahi)

(8) Man arrested for bomb threat to U.S. Embassy (Sankei)

(9) Flights leaving Haneda to the west to be shorter by 3 minutes
with partial return of airspace over U.S. Yokota base, starting in
September (Asahi)

(10) Prime Minister's schedule, June 30 (Nikkei)

ARTICLES:

(1) U.S. makes one compromise after another to North Korea; Hasty
results are fraught with danger

NIKKEI (Page 2) (Full)
July 1, 2008

The United States delisted North Korea as a terrorism sponsor in
return for Pyongyang's declaration of its nuclear development
programs. Following this, the six-party talks have entered a new
phase. Under the situation in which things are going on under the
lead of the U.S. and North Korea, Pyongyang has given no information
on the number of nuclear weapons and facilities it now possesses.
Since nuclear arms threaten Japan's national security, the
government, which has been beset with the issue of North Korea's
abductions of its people, now finds itself in a difficult
situation.

U.S. President Bush abruptly changed his schedule and appeared in
the White House's Rose Garden a little past 07:30 on June 26. The
President held a press conference to announce the delisting plan
only less than two hours after the North presented the nuclear
report.

Recently, the Bush administration has often used North Korea's
favorite expression, "action for action," in an apparent attempt to
justify what it did in response to North Korea's action.

In a drive to hurriedly produce positive diplomatic results in the

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SUBJECT: DAILY SUMMARY OF JAPANESE PRESS 07//08

run-up to the expiration of its term of office, the Bush
administration has made one compromise after another. The North's
nuclear report is not directly linked to the removal of North Korea
from the U.S. blacklist under a six-party agreement. But the U.S.
decided to delist North Korea with the aim of prompting Pyongyang to
produce a nuclear report six months behind schedule.

Japan has taken seriously the fact that the report contains no
information about North Korea's nuclear weapons. Focusing on this
fact, U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Christopher Hill said in
talks held by Japan, the U.S., and South Korea in Washington in
mid-May, "That's why the verification of the report becomes
important." He called on his counterparts for their cooperation in
forming a framework to verify the nuclear report.

The Bush administration has also deepened cooperative relations with
India and Pakistan, both of which possess nuclear weapons. While
making utmost efforts to prevent Iran's nuclear development in the
Middle East, the Bush administration has given top priority to
preventing North Korea from shipping its nuclear weapons. The
administration has thus adopted the so-called "double standard."

According to (U.S.) informed sources, North Korea gives priority to
the nonuse and nonproliferation of nuclear weapons over possession,
like Pakistan. This shows that the U.S. has a different type of
alarm from Japan, which is faced with nuclear threat.

The U.S.-North Korea framework accord signed under the Clinton
administration in 1994 used just the expression "freeze" (on
operations at nuclear facilities in North Korea), so North Korea,
breaking its promise, resumed plutonium production. The resumption
allowed the North to develop nuclear weapons. North Korea might do
the same thing under the latest agreement, too. But NSC Advisor
Stephen Hadley said: "The framework agreement was a bilateral accord
between the U.S. and North Korea. The agreement this time specifies
that multilateral nations push ahead with sanctions and diplomatic
negotiations. The accord also obligates the North not to freeze but
to disable nuclear facilities."

U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice advocates developing the
six-party talks into a Northeast Asia security mechanism. If moves
for creating the mechanism gain momentum in the six-party foreign
ministerial, the next U.S. administration will take over the
challenge. Hadley emphasized that the two factors of multilateral
agreement and continuity will ensure that the failure in the days of
the Clinton administration will never be repeated.

Even so, a sense of apprehension cannot be erased. The Group of
Eight (G-8) leaders planned to hold the six-party talks soon after
the U.S. delists North Korea, but this plan was cancelled. Behind
this decision seems to be North Korea's strategy to put off the
six-party talks to sometime after the G-8 Summit (Lake Toya Summit)
and ascertain moves by U.S. Congress during the 45 days until the
delisting plan is put into effect. The Japan-U.S. summit to be held
on the sidelines of the G-8 Summit will be the first important test
case to prompt Pyongyang to disable its facilities in the third step
under the six-party agreement.

(2) Nuclear threat to Japan -- Repercussions from North Korea's
nuclear declaration (Part 1): Impatient U.S. to delist just as DPRK
anticipated


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SUBJECT: DAILY SUMMARY OF JAPANESE PRESS 07//08

YOMIURI (Page 1) (Full)
June 28, 2008

U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, visiting Kyoto on June 27
to attend the Group of Eight foreign ministerial, was hit by
questions during a press conference to explain the U.S. decision to
remove North Korea from its list of state sponsors of terrorism. She
replied: "Even if the DPRK is delisted as a state sponsor of
terrorism, there still remain sanction measures against it."

Washington's decision to start the process of delisting Pyongyang in
return for the North's having provided the day before a list of its
nuclear programs, as promised in a six-party agreement, met with
strong reactions not only in Japan but also the United States. The
Wall Street Journal carried an editorial that went: "Delisting North
Korea will send a message to rogue states that just by producing
nuclear weapons, they can boost their political power."

President George W. Bush has acknowledged that the DPRK's nuclear
declaration does not include the enriched-uranium nuclear program,
nuclear cooperation with Syria, and a list of nuclear weapons, which
threaten Japan's security. The Bush administration has made a
complete about-face in its policy from the one it professed when it
was inaugurated. At that time, President Bush described North Korea
as part of an "axis of evil."

For the Bush administration, negotiations with North Korea on its
nuclear programs are a fight against time. There are about seven
months to go before President Bush leaves office. However, North
Korean leader Kim Jong Il can serve as general secretary for as long
as he wishes. There was a previous case in which the White House
made a major concession to North Korea during its closing days
because it was in the rush to achieve progress on denuclearization.
President Bush, too, is proving to be no exception.

North Korea completely saw through President Bush's anxiousness to
make a deal. According to a source familiar with the six-party
talks, Washington and Pyongyang generally agreed on the contents of
the DPRK's nuclear declaration in their bilateral meeting in April.
In order to win further concessions, however, Pyongyang dragged out
negotiations, urging Washington to first delist it from its rest of
state sponsors of terrorism. The source said: "North Korea took
advantage of Christopher Hill, chief U.S. negotiator at the
Six-Party Talks."

Following Pyongyang's submission of its nuclear declaration,
Six-Party Talks on North Korean's nuclear programs will enter the
next stage in which the DPRK is to completely abandon its nuclear
weapons. However, the time left for the Bush administration to reach
that stage is too short.

The Japanese government has insisted that the United States should
not delist the DPRK before improvement is made on the abduction
issue. Tokyo will not only have to move ahead with the U.S., South
Korea, China and Russia to pressure the North to abandoning its
nuclear weapons, it will also have to find a way to resolve of the
abduction issue. It therefore finds itself in a difficult position.
North Korea considers delisting to be an important step toward
normalizing relations with the United States. As Washington and
Pyongyang move closer to each other, it is conceivable that discord
might break out between Tokyo and Washington.


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SUBJECT: DAILY SUMMARY OF JAPANESE PRESS 07//08

Prime Minister Yasuo Fukuda said on June 27: "Denuclearization is
important, but we have to resolve the abduction issue, as well." He
underscored his intention to aim at pressuring North Korea to
abandon its nuclear programs and at the same time making progress on
the abduction issue. At the G-8 Summit in Hokkaido, which will open
just 10 days from now, Fukuda intends to take up the North Korean
issue in a positive manner in order to boost his administration's
popularity. However, if the Fukuda government provides support to
North Korea without any progress on the abduction issue, its
diplomacy might be fatally wounded A senior Foreign Ministry
official said in worried voice: "Any mishandling of the issue could
create a problem for the future that would make it difficult for the
Fukuda administration to survive.

(3) Nuclear threat to Japan -- Repercussions from Korea's nuclear
declaration (Part 2): Need for Japan to rebuild North Korea policy,
U.S. policy

YOMIURI (Page 1) (Full)
June 29, 2008

On June 25, a day before the United States started the process of
removing North Korea from its list of state sponsors of terrorism,
U.S. President George W. Bush called Prime Minister Yasuo Fukuda on
the phone to say: "I will not forget the abduction issue." Although
the remark shows the President's sincere feeling, his real intention
was in his unreported remark: "There must never be a divide in
U.S.-Japan relations. That would please only North Korea."

If the delisting actually takes place 45 days later, Japan will lose
an effective pressure card against North Korea for resolving the
abduction issue. The remark was an expression of President Bush's
concern that if Japan were to display skepticism about the
reliability of the bilateral alliance, Pyongyang would triumph in
the end.

The Fukuda government is now under pressure to revamp its North
Korea policy and to review the foundation of the Japan-U.S.
alliance.

Japan has already announced in the recent bilateral working-level
talks its decision to partially lift sanction measures against North
Korea, reflecting Fukuda's stance of giving more importance to a
"dialogue" approach than to a "pressure" approach. Japan now needs
to come up with an elaborate strategy toward North Korea that uses
as diplomatic leverage the use of economic cooperation and energy
assistance.

Creating a mechanism which would allow the involvement of Japan and
international organizations to join the reinvestigation of the
abduction issue will be a topic of discussion between Tokyo and
Pyongyang. Otherwise, North Korea might again claim there are no new
facts, as it said in 2004 after the two meetings between Prime
Minister Junichiro Koizumi and North Korean leader Kim Jong Il.

It is also important for the Japanese government to gain the
public's understanding.

Shigeru Yokota and Sakie Yokota, the parents of abductee Megumi
Yokota, openly voiced their distrust of the government on June 28 in
Tsuruoka City, Yamagata Prefecture. They stated that they saw no
enthusiasm in the Japanese government to get the abductees back.

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SUBJECT: DAILY SUMMARY OF JAPANESE PRESS 07//08


There is a certain sense of helplessness in the Japanese government.
According to a senior Foreign Ministry official, the prevailing view
there is delisting will come but the implementing process would not
get started for a while.

Ever since he took office, Fukuda has called on Bush not to remove
the DPRK from the U.S. list of state sponsors of terrorism, but
Japan's request has not been accepted. Some influential Liberal
Democratic Party (LDP) members contend that they there is no
evidence that Fukuda has made any effort to strengthen the
Japan-U.S. alliance relationship. They cite his lack of interest in
the use of the right of collective self-defense, which the United
States has continued to ask Japan to consider.

Fukuda must strengthen the foundation of the Japan-U.S. alliance,
while moving forward with negotiations with Pyongyang by using a
carrot-and-stick negotiating approach. Now is the time for Fukuda to
test his diplomatic skills.

(4) Dispatch of "handful of" SDF personnel to Sudan: lack of PKO
strategy

ASAHI (Page 2) (Slightly abridged)
July 1, 2008

Prime Minister Fukuda during a meeting with UN Secretary General Ban
Ki Moon held on June 30 revealed his government's plan to dispatch
Self-Defense Forces (SDF) personnel to the command center of the UN
peace-keeping operations (PKO) in southern Sudan. Defense Minister
Ishiba is expected to order the Joint Staff Council chairman to
prepare for the dispatch of a handful of SDF personnel in September.
The Defense Ministry will dispatch a preparatory team to Sudan
within July at the earliest for the inspection of the central
command located in al-Khartum.

Participation in PKO is one of the concrete measures Japan takes as
a peace-cooperating state. Ban during the meeting welcomed the move,
noting: "It is very encouraging. I welcome Japan's decision." He
said he hoped for Japan's cooperation in logistical support,
including transportation as well as the dispatch of command center
personnel, saying, "I hope the SDF will contribute in specialized
areas in the future." Fukuda also told Ban plans to donate about 1
million dollars to the PKO training center in Malaysia and dispatch
an SDF officer as a lecturer to the center as a first case.

MOD opposes foregone conclusion that SDF personnel should be
dispatched

Fukuda during a joint press conference with Ban held after the
meeting proudly said, "I have conveyed to UN Secretary General Ban
Japan's resolution that it as a peace-cooperating nation will make
comprehensive contributions in a proactive manner for the sake of
peace and the further development of our society."

The idea of dispatching SDF personnel cropped up after Prime
Minister Fukuda came up with a proposal for making Japan a
"peace-cooperating nation" in a policy speech he delivered in
January. Related government agencies desperately tried to find an
appropriate country to be the destination for Japan's PKO personnel
at the request of the Fukuda administration, which wanted to
demonstrate Japan's international contribution to the international

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SUBJECT: DAILY SUMMARY OF JAPANESE PRESS 07//08

community as the summit-host nation. They came up with Sudan.

The Kantei and the Foreign Ministry at first considered the
possibility of dispatching GSDF personnel to Juba, a major city in
southern Sudan. However, the Ministry of Defense (MOD) opposed the
government's stance that made dispatching SDF personnel a foregone
conclusion, saying that it had had a harsh experience when it
dispatched personnel to Mozambique, where they encountered trouble
from local diseases. Reasons cited by the MOD included the argument
that it was not in national interests for SDF personnel to risk
their lives in Sudan. They argued that the country has a different
climate and culture and that the Defense Ministry cannot dispatch
troops to dangerous areas just for the convenience of the Foreign
Ministry and for PKO strategy. However, China is rapidly increasing
its presence in Africa through the dispatches of PKO personnel and
official development assistance (ODA). China has dispatched 1,977
personnel as of the end of May, following France -- both are UNSC
members. Japan has dispatched only 36, the smallest number among G-8
member nations. Africa is far away from Japan in geographical terms.
However, its importance as a supplier of rare metals is increasing.


The following comment by a Japanese government source indicates
Japan lacks a PKO strategy: "When withdrawal of SDF personnel from
refueling operations in the Indian Ocean and air-lifting operations
in Iraq became a hot topic, we realized that our policy toward
UN-led PKO activities was weak. We should have compiled a mid- to
long-term strategy for international cooperation."

(5) Ozawa embarks on coordination for campaign cooperation with
other opposition parties on his nationwide tour

YOMIURI (Page 4) (Excerpts)
July 1, 2008

Ichiro Ozawa, president of the major opposition Democratic Party of
Japan, on June 30 visited Gifu Prefecture, the last prefecture on
his nationwide stumping tour that began in May 2006 shortly before
assuming the party presidency. With an eye on a Lower House
dissolution for a snap general election, Ozawa has also embarked on
coordination with the aim of carrying out campaign cooperation with
the Social Democratic Party (SDP) and the People's New Party (PNP).
His effort has already given rise to objections in some local
districts.

After touring shopping streets in Gifu City yesterday, Ozawa
exchanged views with local housewives and others and sought the
cooperation of Rengo (Japanese Trade Union Confederation) Gifu
executives. Ozawa also held a press conference in the city and
indicated that he would make clear his attitude in late August or
later regarding the DPJ leadership race, saying: "I want to continue
visiting a variety of places in July. My calendar is packed with
events at least until after the (mid-August) Bon holiday break. I am
so engrossed in the nationwide tour that the party presidential race
is not on my mind."

The frequency of Ozawa's nationwide visits increased in June. In
fact, Gifu was the 13th prefecture he visited in the month. His tour
has been focused on campaign cooperation with other opposition
parties. The SDP is reluctant to join hands with the DPJ in such
prefectures as Yamagata, Miyagi, Niigata, Fukuoka, Oita, Miyazaki,
and Okinawa. Given the situation, when he visited those prefectures,

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Ozawa made certain to meet in person with local Rengo, DPJ, and SDP
executives. The reason is that Ozawa, deeming the SDP's prefectural
organization rigid, thinks controlling SDP headquarters is
difficult. In yesterday's press conference, Ozawa expressed high
hopes for the SDP's organizational strength, saying: "The SDP still
has influence in some local districts. Joining hands with that party
is essential."

The DPJ has also stopped looking for its own candidates for some
districts, including the Tokyo No. 25 constituency, where PNP
candidates are likely to win seats as a result of garnering votes
from postal organizations.

The DPJ has informally determined its own candidate for 243
single-seat constituencies. Further, the party has decided to back
SDP and PNP candidates for 10 constituencies and is also considering
supporting the two parties' candidates in an additional 20-30
constituencies.

Ozawa's top-down approach displayed in his nationwide tour has been
drawing fire in some areas. In Akita, Ozawa dissuaded the DPJ
prefectural chapter from backing a prefectural assemblyman and to
instead to support the SDP candidate. This has left strong
discontent in the prefectural chapter.

(6) Poll on Fukuda cabinet, political parties

NIKKEI (Page 2) (Full)
June 30, 2000

Questions & Answers
(Figures shown in percentage. Parentheses denote findings from the
last survey conducted in late May.)

Q: Do you support the Fukuda cabinet?

Yes 26 (24)
No 63 (64)
Can't say (C/S) + don't know (D/K) 11 (12)

Q: Which political party do you support or like now?

Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) 36 (31)
Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ or Minshuto) 35 (36)
New Komeito (NK) 4 (5)
Japanese Communist Party (JCP) 3 (4)
Social Democratic Party (SDP or Shaminto) 1 (2)
People's New Party (PNP or Kokumin Shinto) 0 (0)
New Party Nippon (NPN or Shinto Nippon) 0 (0)
Other political parties 1 (1)
None 15 (16)
C/S+D/K 5 (5)

(Note) The total percentage does not become 100 PERCENT in some
cases due to rounding

Polling methodology: The survey was taken by Nikkei Research Inc.
over the telephone on a random digit dialing (RDD) basis. For the
survey, samples were chosen from among men and women aged 20 and
over across the nation. A total of 1,555 households with one or more
eligible voters were sampled, and answers were obtained from 900
persons (57.9 PERCENT ).

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(7) Wiercinski becomes new commander of U.S. Army Japan at Camp
Zama

ASAHI (Page 31) (Full)
July 1, 2008

By Mitsuo Sekine

There was a commander replacement ceremony at U.S. Army Japan
(USARJ) headquarters at Camp Zama (Sagamihara City, Zama City) on
June 30. Brig. Gen. Francis Wiercinski, former deputy commanding
general of U.S. Army Pacific in Hawaii, has now become the new USARJ
commander, replacing Maj. Gen. Elbert Perkins, who has retired after
serving in the post for five years. As was the case with his
predecessor, Wiercinski also presides over the headquarters of U.S.
Army 1st Corps.

Lt. Gen. Benjamin Mixon of U.S. Army Pacific and Gen. Ryoichi Oriki,
chief of staff of the Ground Self-Defense Force, and others attended
the ceremony. Outgoing commander Perkins delivered a speech before
some 220 Japanese and American persons, in which he said: "I am
proud of the last five years (here at Camp Zama). The establishment
of U.S. Army 1st Corps headquarters at Camp Zama (in December 2007)
has made us feel that the Japanese Ground Self-Defense Force is
always beside us." Many Camp Zama-centered plans are in place to
strengthen collaboration between Japan and the Untied States, such
as increasing the number of personnel at U.S. Army 1st Corps
headquarters from the current 30 to 90 in September and the
relocation of the GSDF Central Readiness Regiment to Camp Zama by
fiscal 2012.

Meanwhile, Brig. Gen. Wiercinski, who is scheduled to become a major
general before long, said in his speech: "I have hopes for Japan, a
great ally of the United States."

Holding a press conference on behalf of the new commander, Maj.
James Crawford, a U.S. Army spokesman at Camp Zama, said: "The
United States and Japan will continue strengthening cooperation.
Increasing his understanding of Japan is the new commander's
immediate task. In July, he is scheduled to tour U.S. and SDF bases
across Japan and to visit places in (Kanagawa) Prefecture and
Zama."

(8) Man arrested for bomb threat to U.S. Embassy

SANKEI (Online) (Full)
June 30, 2008 (22:59)

The Akasaka Police Station of Tokyo's Metropolitan Police Department
on June 30 arrested a 50-year-old jobless man of Ichihara City,
Chiba Prefecture, for threatening to blow up the U.S. Embassy in
Tokyo's Minato Ward. The man has admitted to the charges, but the
Akasaka police will carefully check his mental competency to bear
responsibility.

According to police investigations, the man called the U.S. Embassy
that day from his home at around 10:30 a.m., saying, "I've set a
bomb there, and it will blow up at 12 noon." Police tightened
security, and the man is charged with obstructing the embassy's
business. His home telephone number was displayed on the embassy's
telephone, so he was identified.

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There was a similar telephone call to the U.S. Embassy on June 26.
The Akasaka police are investigating the man's involvement.

(9) Flights leaving Haneda to the west to be shorter by 3 minutes
with partial return of airspace over U.S. Yokota base, starting in
September

ASAHI ONLINE (Full)
July 1, 2008, 1:27PM

Yokota Air Base of the U.S. military (Tokyo) will partially return
to Japan this September the airspace over which the base has the air
traffic control rights. After the airspace is partially returned to
Japan, the flight times of aircraft leaving Haneda Airport and
heading west will be shortened by about three minutes on average,
according to a provisional calculation released by the Land,
Infrastructure, and Transport Ministry today. The operation of
flights on new routes will be initiated on Sept. 25.

In an agreement reached between the governments of Japan and the
U.S. in 2006 over the airspace controlled by the Yokota base, the
U.S. side agreed to partially return the airspace to Japan. The
so-called Yokota RAPCON (Radar Approach Control) area covers a wide
airspace, including space over Tokyo and Yokohama. With the Yokota
RAPCON area as the "block," commercial aircraft leaving Haneda and
bound for the west must raise their altitude, while circling around
above Tokyo Bay to a higher altitude than the RAPCON area. The
partial return will enable aircraft to fly at a lower altitude. It
will become possible to set new flight routes more effectively.

Flight times will be shortened by about three minutes on average -
about four minutes for flights bound for Fukuoka and Hiroshima, and
about two minutes for those headed for the Kansai district. The
ministry's calculation also sees annual fuel costs will be cut by
approximately 2.8 billion yen and that carbon dioxide emissions will
be reduced by an amount equivalent to the total of emissions from
15,000 households annually. Many people concerned expect the partial
return of the airspace will contribute to easing the rising air
traffic problem and improving the safety of air traffic.

(10) Prime Minister's schedule, June 30

NIKKEI (Page 2) (Full)
July 1, 2008

09:30
Posed for a photo with his wife and UN Secretary General Ban Ki Moon
and his wife at the Kantei. Hosted a welcome event.

10:00
Met Globe International chairman and others. Followed by Japan Trade
Union Confederation Chairman Takagi. Later met METI Vice Minister
Kitabata, Deputy Vice Minister Toyoda, and Resources and Energy
Agency Director General Mochizuki.

11:34
Met former Prime Minister Nakasone at Sabo Hall in Hiraga-cho.

12:32
Met Chief Cabinet Secretary Machimura at the Kantei.


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SUBJECT: DAILY SUMMARY OF JAPANESE PRESS 07//08

13:34
Met Foreign Minister Koumura and Machimura. Koumura stayed behind.

13:59
Met former Prime Minister Kaifu at TBR Building in Nagata-cho.

14:29
Met at the Kantei with Internal Affairs Minister Masuda and
Info-Communications Policy Director General Ogasawara.

15:04
Met former Education and Science Minister Kawamura, caretaker of the
parliamentary council to promote public record libraries, LDP
Digital Archives Subcommittee Chairman Seiko Noda, and others.
Followed by Deputy Chief Cabinet Secretary Futahashi and Assistant
Deputy Chief Cabinet Secretary Saka.

16:03
Met LDP Tax System Research Council Advisor Noda.

18:00
Met Ban. Later, held a joint press conference.

19:10
Hosted a dinner party.

20:42
Returned to his official residence.

SCHIEFFER

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If Martians visited early last week, they’d probably be scratching their heads as to why North Korea was being treated as a potential trigger for global conflict... More>>

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Gordon Campbell: On The Lessons From Corbyn’s Campaign

Leaving partisan politics aside – and ignoring Jeremy Corbyn’s sensational election campaign for a moment – it has to be said that Britain is now really up shit creek... More>>

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Another US Court: Fourth Circuit Rules Muslim Ban Discriminatory

ACLU: Step by step, point by point, the court laid out what has been clear from the start: The president promised to ban Muslims from the United States, and his executive orders are an attempt to do just that. More>>

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