Search

 

Cablegate: Senior Advisor for Conflict Resolution Meeting

VZCZCXRO1287
PP RUEHBZ RUEHDU RUEHGI RUEHJO RUEHMR RUEHRN
DE RUEHKI #0750/01 2560722
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
P 120722Z SEP 08
FM AMEMBASSY KINSHASA
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC PRIORITY 8412
INFO RUEHXR/RWANDA COLLECTIVE
RUCNSAD/SOUTHERN AF DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY COLLECTIVE
RUEAIIA/CIA WASHDC
RHEFDIA/DIA WASHDC
RHMFISS/HQ USEUCOM VAIHINGEN GE
RUZEJAA/JAC MOLESWORTH RAF MOLESWORTH UK

UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 02 KINSHASA 000750

SENSITIVE
SIPDIS

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: PGOV PREL MOPS KPKO CG
SUBJECT: Senior Advisor for Conflict Resolution Meeting
on September 4 with Etumba and Facilitation

1. (SBU) Summary: General Etumba said that CNDP's participation in
the Amani process was essential, but he balked at disengagement
talks being held at Kimoka, noting CNDP had already agreed to an ad
hoc process in Goma. International Facilitation team expressed
surprise at the lack of a meeting with Nkunda and doubted the
government would accept Kimoka. End summary.

2. (SBU) After meeting a CNDP team near Kirolirwe September 4,
Senior Advisor for Conflict Resolution for the Assistant Secretary
for African Affairs Tim Shortley had a brief meeting with General
Didier Etumba, co-chairman of the Joint Technical Commission on
Peace and Security, and the commander and deputy commander of the
Eighth Military Region, General Mayala and Col. Delphin, followed by
a meeting with the international facilitation team and MONUC/Goma.

3. (SBU) Shortley told Etumba that he had just spoken to Kabila's
senior counselor Tshibanda, who had requested a greater U.S.
involvement, including with the CNDP, to ensure that the parties
quickly got down to defining disengagement zones. Shortley said it
was essential that all sides work to reduce tensions, for example by
avoiding indulging in rumors that were not backed up by solid
evidence (a similar position taken by the international facilitation
in the Joint Monitoring Group). Disengagement was, he said, the
only way to prevent the clashes that had occurred over the past ten
days, and it was the essential step toward disarmament. Shortley
said CNDP had committed to withdraw to positions held two weeks ago;
return to disengagement, but in Kimoka (not Goma) due to security
concerns; Phase 1 disarmament and integration exercise and would
make a press statement to that effect. Disengagement in areas of
FDLR presence would, however, present difficulties but could be
achieved through the Nairobi process.

4. (SBU) Etumba responded that, as for the government, it would do
everything within its power to reduce tensions, which were, indeed,
quite high. CNDP was awaited in the peace process at every moment.
CNDP was essential to that process, and Etumba was glad that CNDP
had agreed to return to disengagement talks. Etumba said that CNDP
had a greater weight than other groups, although the others could
not be excluded. However, Etumba said, he was concerned at
Shortley's mention of Kimoka. CNDP had agreed ten days earlier to
participate in technical work on disengagement in ad hoc groups in
Goma, while now it appeared to want yet a different arrangement.
Shortley said that, after the clashes of the past week, CNDP was
afraid to come to Goma even with MONUC escort. He urged Etumba to
press for confidence-building measures such as release of CNDP
political prisoners. Etumba presented Shortley with a photograph of
soldiers in purportedly Rwandan uniforms killed the previous day at
Ntamugenga (south of Rutshuru) saying that it was "proof of Rwandan
support for the CNDP." Shortley said he would present it to Rwandan
officials in Kigali the next day (see Kigali reporting). Etumba
declined to attend the follow-on meeting with the facilitation
team/MONUC.

5. (SBU) Following Shortley's debrief to MONUC and the
international facilitation, French diplomat Bernard Sexe gave voice
to general surprise that Nkunda had not shown up at Shortley's
meeting in Kirolirwe. "You met with the same lower-level CNDP
people we have been seeing repeatedly in Goma or Kimoka, who are now
backing off on their agreement to meet in Goma?" Shortley explained
that both military and civilians were present to include Nkunda's
security officer John Muhire and that Nkunda was reportedly in
Gungu. Sexe charged that "CNDP is making fools of us and are not to
be trusted." British diplomat Tom Pravda asked for clarification on
CNDP's insistence on Kimoka (where the CNDP has failed to live up to
its promise to withdraw its forces four kilometers to the north and
ensure a neutral zone acceptable to the government). Shortley
explained that CNDP has refused to come to Goma because of hostile
environment and threat posed to their personnel. Shortley stated
that CNDP could still disengage from Kimoka and that it would
suffice as an interim site to get the disengagement discussions
moving until the situation calmed. Pravda characterized the CNDP's
insistence on Kimoka as a major backsliding from the previous week.

6. (SBU) Eastern Coordinator Alpha Sow said that both sides
appeared to have soured on the Goma process. The trend in Kinshasa
was increasingly hardline (including Etumba), impatient to finish
with the CNDP by December. Sow charged that Etumba behaved as if he
were commander of the 8th military region rather than co-chair of
the technical commission. CNDP wanted direct dialogue, to which the
government was inflexibly opposed. Sow's deputy, M'hand Ladjouzi,
added that it appeared that the government was using every means at
its disposal (including stirring up the populace to block, stone,
and demonstrate against North Kivu brigade) to pressure MONUC into a
more aggressive military stance against CNDP. He did not believe
that the government was prepared to participate honestly in any

KINSHASA 00000750 002 OF 002


disengagement negotiations. Shortley recommended that MONUC put
observers directly with the 8th military region and with CNDP and
that it formalize a structure for ceasefire violation monitoring.
North Kivu brigade commander Brigadier General Bipin Rawat said that
the brigade already had means of observing and communicating in the
event of violations, with each side always laying entire blame on
the other. The real problem, he said, was the absence of effective
means of punishing violators.

GARVELINK

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
World Headlines

 

Werewolf: Gordon Campbell On North Korea, Neo-Nazism, And Milo

With a bit of luck the planet won’t be devastated by nuclear war in the next few days. US President Donald Trump will have begun to fixate on some other way to gratify his self-esteem – maybe by invading Venezuela or starting a war with Iran. More>>

Victory Declared: New Stabilisation Funding From NZ As Mosul Is Retaken

New Zealand has congratulated the Iraqi government on the successful liberation of Mosul from ISIS after a long and hard-fought campaign. More>>

Gordon Campbell: On The Current US Moves Against North Korea

If Martians visited early last week, they’d probably be scratching their heads as to why North Korea was being treated as a potential trigger for global conflict... More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Lessons From Corbyn’s Campaign

Leaving partisan politics aside – and ignoring Jeremy Corbyn’s sensational election campaign for a moment – it has to be said that Britain is now really up shit creek... More>>

ALSO:

Another US Court: Fourth Circuit Rules Muslim Ban Discriminatory

ACLU: Step by step, point by point, the court laid out what has been clear from the start: The president promised to ban Muslims from the United States, and his executive orders are an attempt to do just that. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 
 
  • Pacific.Scoop
  • Cafe Pacific
  • PMC