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President Clinton On IRA Acceptance Of Proposals

THE WHITE HOUSE

Office of the Press Secretary

For Immediate Release May 6, 2000

REMARKS BY THE PRESIDENT UPON DEPARTURE

The South Lawn

THE PRESIDENT: I would just like to make a brief statement about the acceptance by the IRA of the proposals by Prime Ministers Blair and Ahern. This is a very good day for the people of Northern Ireland. It is a truly historic step. For the first time, the IRA is clearly committed to decommissioning and a process to get there. I applaud that. I want to thank the Prime Ministers and Gerry Adams and everyone else who was involved in this. But this is a very good day.

Q Do you think it will stick?

THE PRESIDENT: Well, I do. Of course, the Unionists still have to formally accept it, but this idea of storing the weapons and having the storage site monitored I think is a way for both of them to achieve their previously stated objectives, both sides. So it's a very, very good day.

Q Weren't we at this point once before, sir?

THE PRESIDENT: No, we never got this far on the details of the implementation. We always knew, I think, that the sequencing of decommissioning and the full implementation of the accords by both sides and by the British government would be a problem. And that's really what this last year-plus has been about. For all of us who've worked on it, this is a very happy.

But I really appreciate the work done by Prime Minister Blair and Prime Minister Ahern, and the fact that the IRA has accepted it and the Sinn Fein has obviously had a role in that. So this is a big step. And they've reached out to the Unionists now. Of course, I hope it will be fully accepted by all parties and we can get the government back up and go on.

Q Why do you think the two Texas senators -- did they reject your nominee because he's Hispanic, Mexican-American?

THE PRESIDENT: There are only two conceivable alternatives, I think. That, or they just don't want to confirm any judges unless they're right wing ideologues. I mean, this man had unbelievable academic credentials; he was endorsed by every conceivable professional association; he was consistent with the judges I've appointed for over seven years now; highly qualified and clearly in the mainstream of the American judiciary.

But, you know, they like judges that are more results-oriented, and it may be that they just want to use this opportunity to try to seize control of the judiciary again. For them, it's all too often a political arm of the government. But to do this to a Hispanic judge from Texas, who has made himself into an excellent lawyer and a superbly qualified person is just unconscionable. I mean, it's unbelievable.

If their committee didn't find this man qualified, I'd certainly be interested in knowing what the criteria of their committee is.

Q But you're not charging that two U.S. senators are prejudiced against Hispanics, are you?

THE PRESIDENT: No, I'm saying that -- you have to ask them, and people can draw their own conclusions. They may or may not be. But since he's clearly well-qualified, and everybody virtually in the world with an opinion has endorsed him, if it's not that, it's that they want somebody who's more politically malleable.

As I said, all you have to do is look at the way so many of their judges perform. They're highly results-oriented when they appoint judges. I just try to appoint people I thought would be fair and interpret the law and be balanced and represent this country. So it might be politics and ideology. But it's a terrible, terrible day for the Hispanic community and for the idea of fairness in the judiciary.

Q What's this going to do -- election, Mr. President?

THE PRESIDENT: I don't know. I don't have a comment on that. I'd rather -- to me this is -- I made this appointment; this man was qualified on the merits, superbly qualified. And he's from a state with a huge Hispanic population and a big caseload, and he deserved a hearing and he deserved to be confirmed. I think it's just disgraceful.

Thank you.

END


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