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Travel advice - India and Pakistan

Travel advice - India and Pakistan

The Foreign Office has revised its Travel Advice to British nationals for India and Pakistan.

As a result of the continuing tensions between the two countries, the Foreign Office has strengthened its Travel Advice for India and Pakistan. Instead of advising British nationals in those countries to
'consider' leaving, the Foreign Office is now advising them that they 'should' leave.

The Foreign Secretary Jack Straw said (5th June):

"It remains my view that war between India and Pakistan is not inevitable and with our international partners we continue to do all we can to avert a crisis. The Prime Minister saw US Defence Secretary Donald Rumsfield earlier today.

I have spoken this morning to US Secretary of State Colin Powell and Japanese Foreign Minister Yoriko Kawaguchi. However given my duty of care towards British nationals and the continuing tensions between the two countries I have decided to make this further change to our Travel Advice today."

The US Government has also announced alterations to its travel advice for US nationals.

This advice follows a previous change in travel advice for India on 31 May when the Foreign Office advised British nationals to consider leaving the country and to defer any travel.

It also follows advice on 22 May for British nationals to consider leaving Pakistan.

ENDS

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COUNTRY ADVICE BULLETINS FOR PAKISTAN AND INDIA

Still Current at: 6 June 2002
Updated: 5 June 2002


India

SUMMARY

In view of the heightened tensions and increased risk of conflict with Pakistan, we advise against travel to India for the time being. We further advise all British nationals currently in India to leave.
We strongly advise against travel to all parts of the state of Jammu and Kashmir.

In view of the heightened tension and increased troop movements along the India/Pakistan border, we advise against all travel in these areas.

The State of Gujarat remains unsettled following the outbreak of serious communal violence in late February 2002.

Visitors should be aware that there is a risk of terrorist attack in India, particularly in the vicinity of key government installations.

Visitors already in India should contact the British High Commission in New Delhi on tel:+11 419 2238/2280 or the appropriate Deputy High Commission (details below) if they have any specific conerns about their safety.

SAFETY AND SECURITY

The recent deterioration in relations between India and Pakistan has increased risk of conflict between the two countries. As a result we advise against travel to India for the time being. We further advise that all British nationals in India should leave the country. Dependants of UK staff and non essential staff in British missions in northern India have been authorised to leave.
Commercial airlines are currently operating as normal into and out of India. Every effort should therefore be made to leave by normal means. Those in India should contact travel operators about the availability of seats. We are in touch with the commercial airlines.

All British nationals are encouraged to monitor developments through the media (including the BBC World Service if possible), and to contact the British High Commission, or the appropriate Deputy High Commission if they have specific concerns about their safety.

There has been serious communal violence in a number of cities and some smaller communities across Gujarat with several hundred killed and curfews imposed in some areas. The situation remains volatile, particularly in Ahmedabad. We advise visitors to exercise caution and to monitor developments through the media. We strongly advise against travelling on highways in rural areas in Gujarat at present. Visitors should be particularly cautious whilst travelling on local trains.

The poor infrastructure makes the provision of consular assistance difficult, particularly in remote areas.

Do not walk alone in isolated spots in the popular tourist areas especially after dark. Visitors should respect local codes of dress and behaviour. There have been several recent incidents of sexual assault against women in Goa.

Theft of valuables, especially passports, is a particular risk at major railway stations and on trains.

Several recent drownings have highlighted the lack of warning signs/flags and life-saving equipment on most of India's beaches. Strong undercurrents are a particular hazard. Tourist boats and other small crafts very rarely carry life saving equipment.

Piracy/armed robbery against ships has occurred in and around India's waters. Mariners are advised to be vigilant and take appropriate action.

Confidence tricksters (particularly in Agra and Jaipur) promise a substantial cash reward for delivery of jewellery abroad but only in return for an initial deposit. The jewellery is invariably worthless and the deposit (often amounting to thousands of pounds) is lost. Incidents of British nationals being held against their will by individuals they have "befriended" while staying in India have increased. Victims holding travellers' cheques and credit or debit cards are required to withdraw funds at a cash-point/bank to obtain their release.

Visitors should not become involved with drugs of any kind.

TERRORISM

British nationals in Islamic countries or countries with large Islamic populations, should exercise particular caution given the current heightened tension. We believe that India is one of a number of countries where there is an increased risk to visible British institutions and organisations from global terrorism.

A terrorist attack on the Indian Parliament building on 13 December 2001 resulted in a number of deaths. There have been terrorist attacks on public buildings in New Delhi. We advise travellers to increase their vigilance when in the vicinity of key government installations, visiting tourist sites or attending major public events around India.

Road Safety

Driving on Indian roads can be hazardous, particularly at night in rural areas. Inadequately lit buses and lorries, poor driving and badly maintained vehicles are the main causes of accidents.

LOCAL TRAVEL


Northern India

Those in areas adjoining Pakistan or planning to cross the international border should take account of tension between India and Pakistan over Kashmir.

Jammu & Kashmir

We strongly advise against travel to all parts of Jammu and Kashmir. Levels of violence remain high in Jammu and Kashmir. Serious incidents of militancy continue in the Kashmir Valley and the Jammu region. Whilst not directed at tourists, violent incidents have occurred recently in public places, including in Srinagar. There have also been a number of landmine explosions and shelling continues across the Line of Control.

There is a risk of kidnapping. Militants took hostage five foreign nationals, including two Britons, in July 1995: one was murdered and the others are also feared dead.

In North Ladakh, in the summer months, there is a high risk of shelling from across the Line of Control in the Kargil area, where there was a serious outbreak of fighting between Indian security forces and infiltrators in the summer of 1999.

Visitors should therefore be aware of travel agents, who will try to convince them that it is safe to travel to Jammu or Kashmir. Despite increased official promotion of Kashmir as a tourist centre, tensions remain high there. No matter how convincing the agents appear to be, their advice should not be followed.

Business representatives and others considering a visit to Jammu and Kashmir should consult the British High Commission, New Delhi.

Other Northern States Trekking: In 2000, there were several attacks (including murder) on trekkers in the mountain areas of Himachal Pradesh and Ladakh. We recommend that trekkers travel in groups and engage local guides.

There have been small bomb explosions on trains and in and around Delhi including shopping areas frequently visited by tourists, train stations and in a hotel in Paharganj, home to most of the budget accommodation. Visitors to Delhi should therefore remain vigilant in public places and around tourist attractions.

Petty crime is common in Delhi. Tourists should take care of their bags, wallets and passports, particularly when travelling by train or bus. Avoid individuals at railway stations offering tickets and tours (mainly to Kashmir and Rajasthan.

East and North East India Most visits to Eastern India are trouble-free but visitors should be aware of the risk of violent crime in rural areas of Bihar.

Some states in North East India, particularly Arunachal Pradesh, Mizoram and Sikkim are generally safe. However, visitors should be aware that militant groups are operating in mainly rural areas of other North East states. We advise against all travel to Manipur and Tripura. While foreigners are not targets of violence, attacks can be indiscriminate.

Permits are required for travel to Sikkim, Arunachal Pradesh, Nagaland, Manipur, Mizoram and the Andaman and Nicobar Islands.

South India

There have been bomb/land mine explosions in Andhra Pradesh mainly directed at local government officials. Travellers should remain vigilant.

Western Region

There has been serious communal violence in a number of cities and some smaller communities across Gujarat with several hundred killed and curfews imposed in some areas. The situation remains volatile, particularly in rural areas. We advise visitors to exercise caution and to monitor developments through the media before confirming travel arrangements. We strongly advise against travelling on highways in rural areas in Gujarat at present.

An earthquake in January 2001 caused catastrophic damage in the Kutch area of Gujarat. Buildings were destroyed in several other cities in Gujarat (including Ahmedabad).

Visitors to Mumbai should be aware that armed robbers have held up taxis travelling along the main highway from the airport to the city in the early hours of the morning (between 0200 and 0600) when there is little traffic on the roads. Visitors using the route during these times should, where possible, arrange to travel by coach or seek advice at the airport on arrival.

Passengers who have cleared customs and immigration at Mumbai airport should be wary of approaches by thieves posing as Government officials.

LOCAL LAWS AND CUSTOMS

Penalties for possession of even small amounts of narcotic substances are severe (a minimum of 10 years imprisonment). The slow judicial process means that lengthy pre-trial detention is the norm.


ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

You must obtain a visa before travelling to India. Visas cannot be obtained on arrival. Foreign nationals arriving in India on long term multiple visas are required to register with the nearest Foreigners Regional Registration Officer within 14 days of arrival. Over-stayers will be fined and may be prosecuted. For further information on entry requirements, visitors are advised to check with their nearest Indian Consulate or the Indian High Commission, India House, Aldwych, London, WC2B 4NA; (tel: 020 7836 8484).


HEALTH

Medical advice about endemic diseases and necessary inoculations should be sought before, travelling.


GENERAL

Between the months of December and April, flights leaving India become very full. Passengers may find themselves 'bumped off' flights even if they have confirmed seats. All international departures must therefore be re-confirmed at least 72 hours before departure.
Flights arriving and departing from airports in Northern India in December and January are often delayed and sometimes cancelled due to fog.

Comprehensive travel insurance is strongly recommended, particularly if participating in activity sports in mountainous areas when search and rescue facilities may be required. If you undertake high-risk sports (eg mountaineering, private flying) check the small print on the policy to ensure that you are covered.. It is advisable to have cover for unexpected losses such as cancelled flights etc.

It is strongly recommended that residents and visitors of over three months or more should register with the British High Commission or the relevant Deputy High Commission in India (see Contact Details below to see which office has responsibility for the various Indian States).

British nationals are advised to seek legal advice before investing in immovable property or businesses in India. There have been several cases where verbal agreements were reneged on and loopholes in agreements exploited to their disadvantage.

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

What is your new travel advice for India?
In view of the heightened tension and increased risk of conflict with Pakistan, we advise against travel to India for the time being. We further advise British nationals currently in India to leave.

Why is the FCO changing its advice?

We have taken this decision in the light of the heightened tension between India and Pakistan and the increased risk of conflict. We are offering dependants of UK staff and less essential staff in our posts in northern India (Delhi and Mumbai) the option to return home.

What is your advice to British nationals in India at the moment, or who are about to travel there?

In view of the heightened tension and increased risk of conflict with Pakistan, we advise against travel to India for the time being. We further advise all British nationals currently in India to leave. Commercial flights are still operating as normal into and out of India and British nationals should consider leaving on these flights. We are advising British nationals in India to contact travel operators about the availability of airline seats.

Does your travel advice cover all of India (including e.g. Goa)?

Yes, our travel advice covers all areas of the country.

How will this affect my travel insurance if I do decide to travel?

Whether or not you are covered depends on what your insurance policy says. You should check the terms of your policy and contact your insurer if you are unclear about what they mean.

What will I do about my holiday which is already booked? Will I be able to get a re-fund?

You should contact the tour operator who you have booked your holiday with, or the travel agent who you booked it through. They will be able to advise you about refunds. You should also contact your insurer.

What are you going to do to get the information about the change to your travel advice out to British nationals who are already in India?

The High Commission will publicise the change as they normally would, including using our warden network to get the information out to the British community resident in India. Additionally, friends or relatives of those travelling in the region might wish to contact them with the information.

How can I get the information to my son who is backpacking in Asia at the moment?

You should use the methods that you normally use to contact relatives travelling in India/Asia. If you cannot make direct contact you should try to leave messages for them in places where you think they might be now or be going to in the near future.

When will it be safe to go to India again?

We are keeping the situation under close and constant review. You should keep on checking our website for updates in our travel advice.

Are you going to evacuate British nationals from India?

No, we are not currently planning to evacuate British nationals from India. We are advising all British nationals currently in India to leave. Commercial flights are still operating as normal into and out of India and British nationals should consider leaving on these flights. We are advising British nationals in India to contact travel operators about the availability of airline seats.

What happens if they can’t afford to leave?

They should contact relatives in the UK and ask them to transfer sufficient funds to them. They should stay in contact with the High Commission.

How many British nationals are there in India?

There could be as many as 20,000 British nationals in India. Some of these have registered with the High Commission, but registration is on a voluntary basis and so many have not.

What about dual nationals? How many are there and are you also recommending they leave?

Indian law does not recognise dual nationals.

How many British nationals visit India every year?

Many thousands of British nationals visit India every year. They range from Britons visiting friends and family in India to those on organised tours.

What about British prisoners in India?

We currently have 23 prisoners in custody in India and seven currently on bail. We are continuing to monitor their welfare as normal. We are in touch with their families.

What about forced marriage cases? And child abduction cases?

We are continuing to provide normal consular assistance to victims of forced marriage and in cases of child abduction. Each case is different and the assistance that we can give will depend on the facts of each individual case.

What happens if a British national needs to renew their passport?

You should contact the nearest High Commission/Deputy High Commission.

How can I find out more about the situation/keep up to date with developments?

You can follow events in the media and keep checking the travel advice on our website. You can call our travel advice helpline on 0117 916 9000.

I am going to Nepal on holiday – will this affect me?

Travellers to Nepal should be aware that we are advising against travel to India and Pakistan. However, we are not advising against travel to Nepal.

British nationals planning to travel to Nepal should monitor events carefully. You should check our website for more detailed information, which will be updated regularly with the latest security and travel information. Additional information can be found at www.britain.gov.np. You can also call our travel advice helpline on 0117 916 9000.

We are keeping our travel advice to Nepal, as with all countries, under constant review.

I am going to Sri Lanka on holiday – will I be affected?

We are not advising against travel to Sri Lanka, except to the north and the east of the country. Visitors should be aware that there has been a high level of terrorist activity in the past. A formal ceasefire in the conflict with the Tamil Tigers (LTTE) was signed on 22 February and the chance of visitors being caught up in a terrorist attack are low, but they should take particular care and remain vigilant. You should check our website for more detailed information, or you can call our travel advice helpline on 0117 916 9000.

We are keeping our travel advice to Sri Lanka, as with all countries, under constant review.

What will happen to the NGOs who have vital work to carry out in India?

It is for NGOs working in India to make plans to ensure the safety of their staff. We hope that they will heed our travel advice in relation to any British nationals on their staff.

Will you be changing your travel advice again soon?

We are keeping the situation under close and constant review. You should keep on checking our website for updates in our travel advice or call our travel advice helpline on 0117 916 9000.

OTHER

CONTACT DETAILS

NORTHERN INDIA: The British High Commission in NEW DELHI covers Delhi, Jammu and Kashmir, Haryana, Punjab, Uttar Pradesh, Himachal Pradesh, Rajasthan and the new State of Uttaranchal. Chanakyapuri, New Delhi 110 021 (tel: +91 11 6872161 Consular fax: +91 11 6116094); e-Mail: nedel.conqry@NewDelhi.mail.fco.gov.uk

EAST AND NORTH-EAST: The British Deputy High Commission in CALCUTTA covers Bihar, Orissa, West Bengal, the States in far North-East India and the new States of Chhattisgarh and Jharkhand. 1 Ho Chi Minh Sarani Calcutta 700 071 (tel: +91 33 288 5172/5176; fax: +91 33 2883435) E-Mail:bdhccalc@giasclOl.vsnl.net.in

SOUTH INDIA: The British Deputy High Commission in CHENNAI covers Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh and Karnataka. 24 Anderson Road, Chennai 600 006 (tel: +91 44 827 3136/37 fax: +91 44 827 5130) E-Mail:bdhcchen@vsnl.com

WESTERN REGION: The Deputy High Commission in Mumbai covers Gujarat, Madhya Pradesh and Maharashtra. Maker Chambers IV 2nd Floor 222 Jamnalal Bajaj Road PO Box 11714 Nariman Point

Mumbai 400 021 (tel: +91 22 283 0517/2330/3602 fax: +91 22 202 7940) E-Mail:Consular@Bombay.mail.fco.gov.uk

There is also a British Consular Office in GOA: 302 Manguirish Building 3rd Floor 18 June Road (Opp Gulf Supermarket) Panaji 403001 GOA (tel: +91 832 228571) E-Mail:bcagoa@goatelecom.com


*****************

Still Current at: 6 June 2002
Updated: 5 June 2002


Pakistan

SUMMARY

In the light of heightened tension and increased risk of conflict with India, we advise against all travel to Pakistan. We further advise that all British nationals currently in Pakistan should leave.
In light of the events following the 11 September atrocities, we already advised against all but essential travel to Pakistan for which there is a compelling reason and where the traveller had confidence in the security provided by his Pakistani contacts.

Terrorist attacks in the region since 11 September have resulted in a number of casualties, including three US and 11 French nationals. Following terrorist attacks on the Indian Parliament building on 13 December 2001, and other terrorist incidents in Kashmir, there has been increased shelling over the Line of Control and increased troop movements along the Pakistan/India border. Tension remains high.

SAFETY AND SECURITY

The recent deterioration in relations between India and Pakistan has increased the risk of conflict between the two countries. As a result, we advise against all travel to Pakistan. We further advise that all British nationals in Pakistan should leave the country. Dependants of UK staff and non-essential staff in British missions in Pakistan have been withdrawn.
Commercial airlines are currently operating as normal into and out of Pakistan. Every effort should therefore be made to leave by normal means. Those in Pakistan should contact travel operators about the availability of seats.

All British nationals are encouraged to monitor developments through the media (including the BBC World Service if possible), and to contact the British High Commission if they have specific concerns about their safety.

The security situation in Pakistan is also uncertain following the 11 September 2001 attacks in the USA; the conflict in Afghanistan; heightened tension between Pakistan and India; and anti-Western attacks in Pakistan. There remains a significant threat from terrorism in major urban areas. There is a considerable risk to personal security.

British nationals who choose to remain in Pakistan in spite of this advice should take the utmost care for their personal safety, checking their physical safety at home and in vehicles. They should avoid predictable and regular movements, political or other demonstrations and gatherings; attendance at regular events particularly those attended by foreign nationals; and any other events where there are doubts about the security measures in place. They should keep in touch with the remaining Consular wardens and register with the British diplomatic offices in Islamabad and Karachi. They should avoid travel to any area (in particular Northern Areas, Northern Baluchistan and inaccessible parts of North West Frontier Province) which they might not be able to leave quickly.

Recent terrorist incidents are listed under the terrorism section below. But, in addition to these, incidents of armed robbery and kidnapping occur throughout the country particularly in Sindh, Baluchistan, and remoter parts of North-West Frontier Province. There have also been sectarian attacks and periodic bomb incidents, particularly in urban centres in Sindh and Punjab.

Karachi has a history of civil disorder problems, although in general civil disorder is no worse now than before 11 September 2001. But the city is volatile and British nationals should exercise particular care. Bomb incidents are not uncommon. There are daily cases of armed car hijackings and criminal violence, and some areas of the city are particularly risky. Check before travelling. Avoid arriving at night and ensure you are met at the airport. The particular terrorist threat in Karachi is covered in the next section.

TERRORISM

The incidence of terrorism, particularly that directed at foreign nationals, has recently increased. Pakistan is one of a number of countries where we believe global terrorism poses an increased threat to visibly British institutions and organisations.

A US journalist was kidnapped in Karachi on 23 January and later brutally murdered. A small explosive device attached to an empty vehicle near the British High Commission in Islamabad detonated on 24 January. There were no casualties. On Sunday 17 March, grenades were thrown in a Protestant church in the diplomatic area of Islamabad, killing five people including two American citizens and injuring many others, including British citizens. On Wednesday 8 May a suicide car bomb attack on a bus carrying French nationals resulted in 14 deaths, including 11 French citizens.

In addition to these more recent developments there have over a longer period been pockets of anti-Western feeling across Pakistan, but particularly in Northern Areas, North-West Frontier Province and Baluchistan. These feelings may be heightened by the current tensions in Afghanistan and the Middle East. In the past there have been incidents of Westerners being kidnapped by Islamic extremists in the region. Sporadic bomb attacks and assassinations directed at the local population also continue around the country. Journalists travelling into Afghanistan have been targeted there - four were shot dead on the Jalalabad-Kabul road on 20 November 2001 - and there is a danger from armed dissidents crossing from Afghanistan to Pakistan in the border areas.

The following sections offer practical advice for travel in Pakistan. They are included for the sake of completeness but should not be read as the green light for all travel in Pakistan. Our advice on that is given in the foregoing sections.

LOCAL TRAVEL

There are long-standing restrictions by the Pakistani authorities on travel to certain areas eg the Federally Administered Tribal Areas.
Travellers near the Line of Control in Kashmir should be aware of the recently increased tension between Pakistan and India over Kashmir.

Visas are necessary to enter India at the Wagah border crossing. The Indian authorities require British nationals who also hold Pakistani passports to apply for visas on their Pakistani passports at the nearest Indian diplomatic missions, before travelling.

Travellers are reminded that visas are normally required when travelling from Pakistan to other South Asian countries.

LOCAL LAWS AND CUSTOMS

Visitors should not become involved with drugs in any way. Possession of even small quantities can lead to imprisonment. Attempting to smuggle drugs, particularly heroin, out of Pakistan can attract the death penalty.
Pakistan is a Muslim state. Importation of alcohol and pork products into Pakistan is forbidden by law. Homosexuality is illegal, as is co-habitation by an unmarried couple. Close fitting and revealing clothing should be avoided.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

All visitors travelling to Pakistan on a British passport require a valid visa. Overstaying can be treated as a criminal offence. For further information on entry requirements visitors are advised to check with the Pakistan High Commission 35-36 Lowndes Square, London SW1X 9JN; telephone: 020 7664 9200; fax: 020 7664 9224. There is no Pakistan visa issuing authority in Afghanistan.
British nationals with non-British dependants should be aware that appropriate visas (eg visit, settlement, etc) are required for visa nationals wishing to enter the United Kingdom.

HEALTH

Outside the major cities of Islamabad, Lahore, and Karachi, few hospitals are of UK standards. Malaria exists in parts of Pakistan, and visitors should seek medical advice before travelling.
For medical and inoculations advice, contact your GP. The Department of Health's Advice for Travellers website (www.doh.gov.uk) provides travel health information for people travelling abroad from the UK. The site advises on health risks around the world and how to avoid them, a country-by-country immunisation checklist and how to obtain medical treatment abroad.

GENERAL

It is advisable to carry a photocopy of the data page and Pakistani visa from your passport at all times. It should always be kept separately from your passport.
Medical insurance must be taken out, including medical repatriation costs, for all visitors to Pakistan. Anyone trekking or climbing in Northern Pakistan should be aware that a $6,000 (US dollar) bond must be paid before a helicopter search and rescue will be launched. Further details on the procedure for this can be obtained from Consular Division of the FCO in London or the Consular Section of the British High Commission in Islamabad.

British nationals should also be aware that poor infrastructure makes the provision of consular assistance difficult, particularly in remote areas.

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

Has the FCO changed its travel advice to Pakistan?
On 23 May we changed our travel advice to warn against all but essential travel to Pakistan and that all British nationals in Pakistan should consider leaving. In view of the heightened tension and increased risk of conflict with India, we are now advising against all travel to Pakistan for the time being. We further advise that all British nationals currently in Pakistan should leave.

What is your advice to British nationals in Pakistan at the moment, or who are about to travel there?

In view of the heightened tension and increased risk of conflict with India, we advise against all travel to Pakistan for the time being. We further advise that all British nationals currently in Pakistan should leave. Commercial flights are still operating as normal into and out of Pakistan and British nationals should consider leaving on these flights. We are advising British nationals in Pakistan to contact travel operators about the availability of airline seats.

We will continue to do everything we can to help any British national who remains in Pakistan. But increased demand for consular services and reduced staff levels mean that what we can do is more limited. That is why we are advising that all British nationals currently in Pakistan should leave.

What are you going to do to get the information about the change to your travel advice out to British nationals who are already in Pakistan?

The High Commission will publicise the change as they normally would, including using our warden network to get the information out to the British community resident in Pakistan. Additionally, friends or relatives of those travelling in the region might wish to contact them with the information.

When will it be safe to go to Pakistan again?

We are keeping the situation under close and constant review. You should keep on checking our website for updates in our travel advice.

Are you going to evacuate British nationals from Pakistan?

No, we are not currently planning to evacuate British nationals from Pakistan. However, in view of the heightened tension and increased risk of conflict with India, we advise against all travel to Pakistan for the time being. We further advise that all British nationals currently in Pakistan should leave. Commercial flights are still operating as normal into and out of Pakistan and British nationals should consider leaving on these flights. We are advising British nationals in Pakistan to contact travel operators about the availability of airline seats.

What happens if they can’t afford to leave?

They should contact relatives in the UK and ask them to transfer sufficient funds to them. They should stay in contact with the High Commission.

Are you organising an evacuation of your staff?

We have recently withdrawn dependants of UK staff and non-core staff from our missions in Pakistan. However, we are not planning to evacuate our remaining staff.

Will you be changing your travel advice again soon?

We are keeping the situation under close and constant review. You should keep on checking our website for updates in our travel advice or call our travel advice helpline on 0117 916 9000.

ENDS

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