World Video | Defence | Foreign Affairs | Natural Events | Trade | NZ in World News | NZ National News Video | NZ Regional News | Search

 

Bioenergy To Ease Poverty In Developing Countries

Boost Bioenergy To Ease Poverty In Developing Countries - UN

With wood, charcoal and fuel-producing crops emerging as environmentally friendly and cost-effective sources of energy, especially for developing countries, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) today called for the urgent inclusion of so-called bioenergy into agricultural and forestry programmes.

"Countries need to move towards more sustainable energy systems based on energy sources such as biomass, solar and wind energies," senior FAO energy coordinator Gustavo Best told four-day International Conference on Renewable Energies in Bonn, Germany. "The production and use of bioenergy also contributes to poverty alleviation and food security. It can reduce land degradation and helps to mitigate climate change," he added.

Bioenergy includes fuelwood and charcoal, energy crops such as sugar cane, sweet sorghum and rapeseed as well as agricultural and forestry residues, to produce heat, ethanol, biodiesel, bioelectricity or biogas. It offers great opportunities for developing countries in creating income and labour opportunities.

Sustainable bioenergy systems should be promoted to prevent deforestation, deterioration of watersheds, and loss of soil fertility and biodiversity, FAO said. Bioenergy can contribute to diversify agricultural and forestry production. Ethanol from sugar, sorghum and cassava or biodiesel from rapeseed and other energy crops can replace considerable amounts of fossil fuels.

Bioenergy in general and wood energy in particular are the dominant sources for about half of the world's population, often the poorest of the poor who use it mainly for cooking and lack access to other sources such as electricity or fuel, which would allow them to generate income and improve their living conditions. Currently, energy from biomass accounts for 15 per cent of energy consumed worldwide and for up to 90 percent in some developing countries.

FAO is currently working with the Shenyang Agr China in developing new sweet sorghum varieties and technologies to produce ethanol to substitute for petrol. Sweet sorghum has the advantage of producing both animal feed and sugars for energy conversion. The agency also has energy projects in Nepal and Brazil.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
World Headlines

 

Gordon Campbell: Is This Guy The World’s Most Dangerous Thirtysomething?

Saudi Arabia has long been regarded as a pillar of stability in the Middle East, and is the essential caterer to the West’s fossil fuel needs. It is also the country that gave us Osama Bin Laden, al Qaeda, and 15 of the 19 terrorists who carried out the 9/11 attacks... More>>

ALSO:

Non-Binding Postal Vote: Australia Says Yes To Same Sex Marriage

Binoy Kampmark: Out of 150 federal seats, 133 registered affirmative totals in returning their response to the question “Should the law be changed to allow same-sex couples to marry?”. More>>

ALSO:

Bonn Climate Change Conference: Protecting Health In Small Island States

The vision is that, by 2030, all Small Island Developing States will have health systems that are resilient to climate change and countries around the world will be reducing their carbon emissions both to protect the most vulnerable from climate risks and deliver large health benefits in carbon-emitting countries. More>>

ALSO:

Camp Shut Down: Refugees Must Be Rescued From Manus

On 31st October 2017, the detention centre on Manus Island in which the Australian Government has been holding more than 700 refugees was closed, leaving those living there in a desperate situation. More>>

ALSO:

EARLIER:

Rohingya Muslims Massacred: Restrictions On Aid Put 1000s At Risk

Amnesty: The Myanmar authorities’ restrictions on international aid in Rakhine state is putting tens of thousands of lives at risk in a region where mainly Rohingya people are already suffering horrific abuses from a disproportionate military campaign. More>>

ALSO: