World Video | Defence | Foreign Affairs | Natural Events | Trade | NZ in World News | NZ National News Video | NZ Regional News | Search

 


Possible Outcome Of Summit On UN Reform

Assembly President Previews Possible Outcome Of Summit On UN Reform

New York, Jun 3 2005

The President of the United Nations General Assembly today presented an early vision of what international consensus on development, security, human rights and UN reform might look like when world leaders gather in September to commemorate the Organization’s sixtieth anniversary.

The so-called draft outcome document for the High-Level Millennium Review, set to run from 14 to 16 September 2005, was presented to a closed-door Assembly session this afternoon by President Jean Ping of Gabon.

It had been drafted following intense consultations among UN Member States in an attempt to incorporate their reactions to proposals for international action on a host of fronts outlined by Secretary-General Kofi Annan in the report “In Larger Freedom,” his agenda for “bold but achievable” UN reforms. That report was released in late March as a five-year update on the UN Millennium Declaration, in which world leaders pledged to build a better and safer planet for the next century. “Member States are ready to take ambitious decisions on all fronts,” Assembly President Ping said at press briefing to preview the document. There was much possibility for consensus, he added.

With regard to development, for example, he said there was general will to increase development assistance. In the area of peace and security, Member States were prepared to take collective measures, especially regarding the protection of civilian populations in cases of genocide and other war crimes. He said that member States were also prepared to establish a peace-building Commission to maintain peace, one of the Secretary-General’s structural recommendations. In other areas, there were possibilities for compromises that came close to the recommendations.

Member States had agreed, for example that today’s Geneva-based Commission on Human Rights did not function to everyone’s satisfaction, he said. However, many had balked at the establishment of a council-level body to replace it. The current draft instead proposed, the creation of a human-rights organ as a subsidiary of the Assembly, with the possibility of promoting it to becoming a principal organ.

The draft outcome document also expresses strong support for the Secretary-General’s strategy to eradicate terrorism in all its forms. The adoption of a general counter-terrorism convention was proposed for no later than the middle of next year.

Still, little consensus was reached on the specifics of Security Council reform. Mr. Ping said that the issue had been the most contentious, “awakening great passions and fixed attitudes.” He had asked the parties not to rush things, since intensive consultations would be held starting on the issue beginning on 21 June.

In many other areas, however, from poverty reduction to the ilicit trade in small arms in light weapons to the role of the Secretariat and other bodies, the text proposes specific agreements.

Reacting to the draft after its release this afternoon, Secretary-General Kofi Annan <"http://www.un.org/News/Press/docs/2005/sgsm9909.doc.htm">called it “a valuable guidepost for advancing development, security, and human rights.”

“Much is at stake,” he said of the negotiations to come, “and I am confident that when world leaders meet in New York this coming September, they will agree on the most far-ranging and ambitious reforms of the United Nations in its 60-year history.”

ENDS


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
World Headlines

 

At The UN: Paris Climate Agreement Moves Closer To Entry Into Force

The Paris Agreement on climate change moved closer toward entering into force in 2016 as 31 more countries joined the agreement today at a special event hosted by United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The End Game In Spain (And Other World News)

The coverage of international news seems almost entirely dependent on a random selection of whatever some overseas news agency happens to be carrying overnight... Here are a few interesting international stories that have largely flown beneath the radar this past week. More>>

Amnesty/Human Rights Watch: Appalling Abuse, Neglect Of Refugees On Nauru

Refugees and asylum seekers on Nauru, most of whom have been held there for three years, routinely face neglect by health workers and other service providers who have been hired by the Australian government, as well as frequent unpunished assaults by local Nauruans. More>>

ALSO:

Other Australian Detention

Gordon Campbell: On The Censorship Havoc In South Africa’s State Broadcaster

Demands have included an order to staff that there should be no further negative news about the country’s President Jacob Zuma, and SABC camera operators responsible for choosing camera angles that have allegedly made the President ‘look shorter’ were to be retrained... More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On A Bad Week For Malcolm Turnbull, And The Queen

Malcolm Turnbull’s immediate goal – mere survival – is still within his grasp... In every other respect though, this election has been a total disaster for the Liberals. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Bidding Bye Bye To Boris

Boris Johnson’s exit from the contest for Conservative Party leadership supports the conspiracy theory that he never really expected the “Leave” option to win the referendum – and he has no intention now of picking up the poisoned chalice that managing the outcome will entail... More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
World
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news