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Rice Interview by Cindy Pena of CBS-WUSA

Interview by Cindy Pena of CBS-WUSA

Secretary Condoleezza Rice
Washington, DC
June 3, 2006

QUESTION: It's a pleasure to meet you.

SECRETARY RICE: It's a pleasure to be here.

QUESTION: Thank you so much. Well, I know that's what we're here to talk about is the National Race for the Cure.

SECRETARY RICE: I'm just so excited to be a part of this, very excited to be a part of this this year. I've really always wanted to be a part of it. I've had a lot of friends who have participated. What the Komen Foundation is doing is so important -- the prevention efforts, the efforts of treatment and, of course, looking for that cure so that one day no one has to worry about this terrible disease.

QUESTION: So few of us have really been affected -- so many of us have been affected by breast cancer, so few of us have not. What is your personal connection?

SECRETARY RICE: My personal connection is that my mother had breast cancer. And she had breast cancer first when I was 15, and I'm so grateful that she survived till I was 30, which meant that she didn't leave behind a high school teenager; she instead knew the adult young woman that I had become and a teacher at Stanford and as a specialist in international politics. And that's we have to fight for. It's so that people can survive this disease, they can flourish with this disease and continue their wonderful lives, and that's why this work is so important.

QUESTION: So what will you be thinking about as you're running or walking along?

SECRETARY RICE: Well, I'll be thinking first and foremost of course about my mother and my own experience, but also about the many, many women who have been survivors of this disease who really with their spirit show us how much the human spirit can survive. And I'll also be thinking of the progress we've made. When my mom had breast cancer back in the 1970s, there weren't that many options for women; and now there are many more options, many more treatment options and people are living better even if they have suffered from the disease.*

QUESTION: One last question. How do you exercise with your grueling travel schedule? You were in Vienna, Austria yesterday?

SECRETARY RICE: That's right. I try to get up really early in the morning, about 4:30 in the morning. Fortunately, I'm an early bird so I don't mind getting up early. I just like to go to bed early.

QUESTION: Thank you so very -- one more. I guess one more quick last question. You have so many supporters here today. So many people are looking at you as a leader for our country. Plans to run for President?

SECRETARY RICE: Oh, no, no. I'm going to be very happy to go back to Stanford and hopefully teach again and do some research, or maybe go into sports management. That's what I'd really love to do.

QUESTION: NFL Commissioner, maybe?

SECRETARY RICE: Well, it looks like that job may be taken by the time I'm ready. But that's okay, I'll find something.

QUESTION: Thank you so very, very much.

SECRETARY RICE: Thanks very much.

2006/581

Released on June 3, 2006

ENDS


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