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Japan vows to continue cruel whale ‘research"

Defiant Japan vows to continue cruel whale ‘research’

Despite more than 25 separate International Whaling Commission (IWC) resolutions calling for an end to lethal research on whales over the past 19 years, Japan today announced it would press on with its controversial ‘scientific’ whaling programme – killing in excess of 1300 whales this year.

Since 1987, Japan has killed almost 8,000 whales, which this year alone included more than 930 minke whales and 10 endangered fin whales. A further 220 minke, 50 Bryde’s, 100 sei and 10 sperm whales will be targeted in the North Pacific this year, again for ‘so called’ research.

Speaking on behalf of the Whalewatch coalition, Andy Ottaway of Campaign Whale, said: “Whaling for ‘research’ is nothing more than commercial whaling in disguise, a cynical ploy to avoid the commercial whaling ban. So called ‘scientific’ whaling is appallingly cruel already and will only get worse as larger species are targeted.”

The expansion of scientific hunts in recent years to include much larger species, such as sperm and fin whales, raises serious welfare concerns. The same harpoons being used to kill much smaller minke whales are now being used on species up to two and three times larger, leading to even longer ‘times to death’.

“Anyone that has witnessed the agonising deaths of harpooned minke whales can only be horrified at the prospect of the immense suffering inflicted upon much larger species in Japan’s scientific hunts,” said Ottaway.

He added: “There is no humane way to kill a whale at sea and on cruelty grounds alone world governments must demand that all commercial and scientific whaling cease.”


-ends-

EARLIER: NZ Govt Breaks The News - Japan has won a simple majority on a significant vote at the International Whaling Commission (IWC) for the first time, Conservation Minister Chris Carter said today. "The IWC has been finely balanced throughout this years' meeting in St Kitts. Until now, we have been able to hold the line. But today Senegal showed up and joined the pro-whaling group allowing Japan to win a key vote on a declaration on the direction of the IWC that seeks to move the Commission back towards commercial whaling," Mr Carter said. See… Japan wins majority at IWC ALSO:

  • Greenpeace - Whalers Win Vote Towards Commercial Whaling
  • Whalewatch coalition - Japan seize majority at whaling commission
  • Sea Shepherd - Japan wins by one vote on pro-whaling resolution
  • EARLIER:
  • NZ First - Watch, Don't Slaughter
  • Japan loses key vote at Whaling Commission
  • Whaling Commission remains on knife edge
  • © Scoop Media

     
     
     
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