World Video | Defence | Foreign Affairs | Natural Events | Trade | NZ in World News | NZ National News Video | NZ Regional News | Search

 

Condoleezza Rice Salute to the Abolitionists


Salute to the Abolitionists Ending Modern-Day Slavery


Secretary Condoleezza Rice
Washington, DC
December 19, 2006

4:30 p.m. EST


SECRETARY RICE: Thank you very much. Thank you, Paula, for that kind introduction and thank you for your personal dedication to this work. I want very much to welcome to this gathering Congressman Frank Wolf, Congressman Chris Smith -- you have been stalwart in helping the United States Government to take on its responsibilities in this important cause. Thank you very much. Thank you Reverend Dr. Lyon for that wonderful prayer and I see my cabinet colleague, Jim Nicholson, Secretary of Veterans Affairs. Welcome to all, to members of the diplomatic community and especially to all of you whose efforts we are celebrating here today.

Gathered here this afternoon are many of the men and women who are helping America to lead the 21st century movement to abolish human trafficking. You understand that the egregious abuses of human life and liberty cannot be tolerated by any culture and that when it comes to the nonnegotiable demands of human dignity, we must work to lift up the world to high standards and to high principles.

President Bush shares that spirit. A little more than three years ago, the President made a bold proclamation before the United Nations General Assembly. He singled out the global scourge of trafficking in persons as one of the great crimes of this young century, indeed, one tantamount to the modern day form of slavery. There's a special evil he said in the abuse and exploitation of the most innocent and vulnerable. Those who create these victims and profit from their suffering must be severely punished.

Today, thanks to your efforts, more governments have begun to criminalize and punish the perpetrators of this abuse and that exploitation. And today, thanks to your efforts, America is building new partnerships with many organizations and individuals across the globe that are helping to rescue and shelter the survivors of trafficking. And today, thanks to your efforts, the media has increased its focus on the reality of human trafficking, raising public awareness by telling the horrific stories of victims. In many ways the success of your work is represented in the annual Trafficking in Persons Report. That reports displays the remarkable year-to-year progress that we are encouraging, reflecting a growing cooperation and commitment among governments to join the fight against trafficking, a fight that for every nation must begin at home.

Indeed in my travels over the past two years, I have noticed a greater desire among our many partners to fight this terrible crime and protect its victims. Not all of the work is done to be sure, but the work is most assuredly underway and much of the credit for that work belongs to Ambassador John Miller, who I'm sad to say is leaving us at the end of this year. But John you're also leaving something really important behind, a truly remarkable record of accomplishment in our campaign against human trafficking.

Ambassador Miller's work these past four years has helped to build and sustain efforts on the part of dozens of governments to confront the crime of human trafficking, to respond to the plight of victims and to apply justice consistent with the international standards. In short, Ambassador Miller, who has given great inspiration to the people with whom he works, including me, Ambassador Miller, has served as a model for the State Department's transformational diplomacy. As Ambassador-at-Large he has used his diplomatic power to help foreign citizens better their own lives, improve their own nations and transform their own futures. I know that Ambassador Miller's son, Rip, is with him here. I'm glad that you have family here to share in this celebration also of your work, John. But I want to thank you for your tenacity and your determination and I want all present here to applaud you for your dedication to abolish the scourge of trafficking in persons. (Applause.)

Thank you.

###

2006/1130

ENDS


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
World Headlines

 

Rohingya Muslims Massacred: Restrictions On Aid Put 1000s At Risk

Amnesty: The Myanmar authorities’ restrictions on international aid in Rakhine state is putting tens of thousands of lives at risk in a region where mainly Rohingya people are already suffering horrific abuses from a disproportionate military campaign. More>>

ALSO:

Werewolf: Gordon Campbell On North Korea, Neo-Nazism, And Milo

With a bit of luck the planet won’t be devastated by nuclear war in the next few days. US President Donald Trump will have begun to fixate on some other way to gratify his self-esteem – maybe by invading Venezuela or starting a war with Iran. More>>

ALSO:

Victory Declared: New Stabilisation Funding From NZ As Mosul Is Retaken

New Zealand has congratulated the Iraqi government on the successful liberation of Mosul from ISIS after a long and hard-fought campaign. More>>

Gordon Campbell: On The Current US Moves Against North Korea

If Martians visited early last week, they’d probably be scratching their heads as to why North Korea was being treated as a potential trigger for global conflict... More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Lessons From Corbyn’s Campaign

Leaving partisan politics aside – and ignoring Jeremy Corbyn’s sensational election campaign for a moment – it has to be said that Britain is now really up shit creek... More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 
 
  • Pacific.Scoop
  • Cafe Pacific
  • PMC