World Video | Defence | Foreign Affairs | Natural Events | Trade | NZ in World News | NZ National News Video | NZ Regional News | Search

 


La Niña Weather Likely To Last For Months

La Niña Weather, With Possible Floods And Droughts, Likely To Last For Months – UN

New York, Oct 11 2010 5:10PM

The La Niña weather pattern is likely to continue and may strengthen over the next four to six months, potentially bringing abnormal conditions to widely separate areas of the world, from floods to droughts to below or above normal temperatures, the United Nations weather agency "http://www.wmo.int/pages/mediacentre/press_releases/pr_900_en.html"reported today.

La Niña, characterized by unusually cool ocean temperatures in the central and eastern tropical Pacific, is the opposite of El Niño, characterized by unusually warm ocean temperatures, and both events can last for 12 months or more, disrupting normal tropical rainfall atmospheric circulation, with widespread impacts on climate in many parts of the world.

But although the current La Niña has similarities to past events, its local impacts may differ from those observed in the past, the World Meteorological Organization ("http://www.wmo.int/pages/index_en.html"WMO) warned in its latest update, stressing that for managing climate-related risks, it is important to consider both prevailing La Niña conditions and other factors with potential influence on the local climate.

Generally with La Niña, rainfall increases across the western equatorial Pacific, Indonesia and the Philippines and is nearly absent across the eastern equatorial Pacific. Wetter-than-normal conditions tend to prevail during December-February over northern South America and southern Africa, and during June-August over south-eastern Australia.

Drier-than-normal conditions are generally observed along coastal Ecuador, north-western Peru and equatorial eastern Africa during December-February, and over southern Brazil and central Argentina during June-August.

La Niña also contributes to large-scale temperature anomalies worldwide, with most affected regions experiencing abnormally cool conditions. Below-normal temperatures occur during December-February in south-eastern Africa, Japan, southern Alaska, west and central Canada, and south-eastern Brazil, and during June-August in India, south-eastern Asia, the west coast of South America, the Gulf of Guinea, northern South America and portions of Central America.

Warmer-than-normal conditions occur during December-February along the Gulf coast of the United States.

“Almost all forecast models predict continuation and possible further strengthening of this La Niña episode for the next 4 to 6 months, taking the event well into the first quarter of 2011,” WMO said.

This is because of the strong interaction between the oceanic and atmospheric aspects of the current event and the large area of below-average subsurface temperatures.

The current La Niña developed quickly in June and July 2010, following the dissipation of the 2009/2010 El Niño in April. Since August, the event has been moderate to strong.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
World Headlines

 

Palestine: Border Police Extremely Close When They Shot The US Activist

New testimony at final hearing in Tristan Anderson's trial indicates Border Police were extremely close when they shot the US activist in the head More>>

Palestine: Ni’lin Demonstrators Met With Violence

International Solidarity Movement On the 20th of March, during Ni’lin’s weekly Friday demonstration, Israeli occupation forces attacked protestors with about 20 rounds of tear gas canisters shot with the ‘venom’ tear gas launcher mounted on a military jeep ... More>>

ALSO:

UN Envoy Says Yemen On 'Rapid Downward Spiral'

Yemen stands on the brink of civil war amid deepening political tensions and an uptick in sectarian violence, United Nations Special Adviser Jamal Benomar warned today as he explained that only through dialogue could the country achieve a peaceful political transition. More>>


Continued International Support As Vanuatu Recovers

Damage seen on Saturday 14 March 2015 in Port Vila, capital of Vanuatu, after Cyclone Pam moved through the Archipelago. Photo: UNICEF Pacific More>>

UNICEF Rushes Emergency Supplies For Cyclone-Affected Tuvalu

The United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) is dispatching emergency life-saving supplies to communities in Tuvalu as part of its efforts to assist communities in the Pacific region that were affected by Tropical Cyclone Pam, with nutrition and hygiene kits arriving today. More>>

Vanuatu: Regenvanu Expects 50% Of People Struck By Pam To Be Homeless

Vanuatu Minister of Lands Ralph Regenvanu says more than 50 percent of those hit by super Cyclone Pam at the weekend are now homeless. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
World
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news