World Video | Defence | Foreign Affairs | Natural Events | Trade | NZ in World News | NZ National News Video | NZ Regional News | Search

 


Asia-Pacific farmers to get better access to technology

UN forges links between researchers and farmers to promote food security

Asia-Pacific farmers to get better access to latest technology and training

Bangkok, Thailand, 12 December 2013. Farmers across Asia and the Pacific could soon have access to new and innovative technologies that would help them meet the region’s demand for increased food production and food security, a UN-convened meeting announced today.

Leaders in agricultural research and extension services from across the Asia-Pacific region and representatives from civil society, private sector and international organizations today concluded an Expert Consultation on ‘Strengthening Linkages between Research and Extension to Promote Food and Nutrition Security.’

The consultation, attended by over 40 delegates from more than ten countries, discussed ways to connect research results and new technologies on food and agriculture production with farmers on the front lines of Asia’s food production systems. The need for such transference of information is critical. By 2050, the FAO estimates that food production will need to increase by 60 percent, a target that cannot be met unless we harness our research and transmit it to farmers’ practices.

The consultation was convened by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations (Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific) and the Centre for Alleviation of Poverty through Sustainable Agriculture (CAPSA), a regional institute of the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP). The two-day meeting addressed the current challenges faced by farmers in the region who require stronger support to realize research results and new agricultural technologies for application in a practical and meaningful way.

The meeting was co-sponsored by the Asia Pacific Association of Agricultural Research Institutions (APAARI), and the ‘Network for Knowledge Transfer on Sustainable Agricultural Technologies and Improved Market Linkages in South and Southeast Asia’ (SATNET Asia), a European Union-funded project.

An emerging and growing middle class in the Asia-Pacific region, which co-exists with persistent hunger in many countries, is demanding a system of more diverse and quality food production and processing. Meeting those demands will require more meat, dairy, fruit and vegetable products. In this context, it is important for farmers to adopt new agriculture technology, but they will require technical assistance in order to do so.

Hiroyuki Konuma, FAO’s Assistant Director-General and Regional Representative in Asia and the Pacific notes that the promotion of agricultural research is important to enable future food production increases and attain food security for our future generations, even as arable lands are almost fully exploited in the region. “But agricultural research alone can't produce more food, unless research results and technologies are effectively transmitted to farmers for practical application,” said Konuma. “Hence the importance of agricultural extension services, through an enhanced participatory approach, innovative technological application, such as ICT and increased involvement of the private sector. These approaches must be fully recognized and further promoted,” he added.

Participants agreed upon an Action Framework to guide future efforts of stakeholders in enhancing research-extension partnerships in the Asia-Pacific Region. In particular, the Framework will contribute to more sustainable food systems and improved farmers’ productivity, thereby helping address the United Nations ‘Zero Hunger Challenge’ – a global initiative that encourages all partners to scale up their efforts and turn the vision of an end to hunger into a reality. The Action Framework highlights both national efforts as well as regional collaboration to overcome common challenges.

“We urgently need to rebalance our investment priorities and policies in order to give more attention to the development of agriculture and the rural sector,” said Shun-ichi Murata, Deputy Executive Secretary of ESCAP.

"The creation of a regional network for agricultural extension will ultimately benefit small farmers, fishermen, pastoralists and foresters in this region by strengthening the interface between research and the users of research," said Dr. Katinka Weinberger during the closing session of the Expert Consultation.

The meeting also assessed existing linkages between research and extension systems in member countries to identify opportunities for enhancing their integration. The important role of farmers' groups, civil society and private sector organizations, including information and communications technology service providers was particularly highlighted in this context.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
World Headlines

 

UK Labour Statement: The Shooting Of MP Jo Cox

Jeremy Corbyn MP, Leader of the Labour Party said: “The whole of the Labour Party and Labour family - and indeed the whole country - will be in shock at the horrific murder of Jo Cox today. Jo had a lifelong record of public service and a deep commitment to humanity." More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Rainbow Colours On MFC In Sympathy For Florida Killings
Wellington’s Michael Fowler Centre will be lit in colours of the rainbow Monday as a gesture of support for the LGBTI victims of the Pulse nightclub attack in Orlando, Florida. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On How Obama’s Supreme Court Choice Says Everything (Bad) About His Presidency

Nothing has epitomised the presidency of Barack Obama quite like his Supreme Court nominees. Time and again, Republican presidents will blithely nominate right wing ideological extremists (Antonin Scalia, Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas) who only sometimes misfire and turn out to be liberals in disguise (David Souter). Yet Obama has consistently skipped over the judicially qualified liberals and gone for a succession of centrists... More>>

ALSO:

Turkey: UN Secretary-General On The Terrorist Bombing In Ankara

The Secretary-General condemns the terrorist attack in Ankara earlier today. According to the latest reports, the explosion in the Kizilay district killed and wounded dozens of people. More>>

ALSO:

Five Years On: Fukushima And New Zealand

Science Media Centre: It was the worst nuclear event since Chernobyl. In the wake of the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, a crippled Japanese nuclear powerplant went into meltdown, and the world watched as emergency workers scrambled to shut down and contain the reactors. More>>

ALSO:

UNICEF: 1 In 3 Syrian Children Has Grown Up Knowing Only Crisis

An estimated 3.7 million Syrian children – 1 in 3 of all Syrian children - have been born since the conflict began five years ago, their lives shaped by violence, fear and displacement, according to a UNICEF report. This figure includes more than 151,000 children born as refugees since 2011. More>>

ALSO:

Franklin Lamb: Syria’s Truce Bodes Well For Salvaging Our Cultural Heritage

The tentative cessation of hostilities in Syria, which came into effect on 2/28/2016, brokered by Washington and Moscow, is only in its second week... It is well documented that there have been daily incidents of artillery shelling, airstrikes and clashes. Yet, for the nearly 12 million displaced civilians, half of Syria’s population, it’s a much welcomed respite. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
World
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news