World Video | Defence | Foreign Affairs | Natural Events | Trade | NZ in World News | NZ National News Video | NZ Regional News | Search

 


First-hand testimony of tribe reveals shocking exploitation

A rare first-hand account has emerged of the shocking sexual exploitation of Jarawa women and the introduction of alcohol and drugs to the vulnerable tribe on India's Andaman Islands.© Survival

An extremely rare first-hand account of the shocking extent of sexual exploitation of young women of the Jarawa tribe on India’s Andaman Islands has emerged.

In an audio recording obtained by Survival International and reported by the British newspaper The Observer, a young Jarawa man reports that poachers regularly enter his tribe’s protected reserve and lure young Jarawa women with alcohol or drugs to sexually exploit them.

The young Jarawa man said, ‘The girls say, that the outside boys pressure them to do a lot. They pressure them with their hands and fingernails, when the girls get angry. They chase them under the influence of alcohol. They have sex with the girls… They drink alcohol in the girls’ house. They sleep in the Jarawa’s house. They smoke marijuana and then chase the girls.’

He went on to list the names of poachers who come into their forest to sexually exploit the Jarawa girls.

The interview first appeared in the Andaman Chronicle, a local newspaper, which also reports an alarming increase in confrontations between the Jarawa and settlers who live around the edges of their reserve.

According to the reports, a group of Jarawa confronted a party of locals on a beach near the edge of the Jarawa reserve last weekend. It is believed that the Jarawa are seeking to punish those who had sexually exploited Jarawa girls.

Further reports emerged that a group of 60 settlers recently ventured to the edge of the tribe’s reserve with the intention of attacking the Jarawa community, who fled into the forest.

The 400-strong Jarawa are extremely vulnerable to exploitation, diseases and dependency on goods such as alcohol brought in by outsiders. The nomadic hunter-gatherers only started to come out of their forest without their bows and arrows and have friendly contact with their neighbors in 1998.

Today, hundreds of tourists travel through their land in the hope of spotting a member of the tribe, in what has become known as ‘human safaris’.

Sexually transmitted diseases and HIV/AIDS are a grave threat for recently contacted tribes such as the Jarawa, and women are commonly exploited by more powerful outsiders. The Jarawa’s neighbors, the Great Andamenese, were nearly wiped out by diseases brought in by the British colonizers in the 19th Century, including syphilis.

Survival’s Director Stephen Corry said today, ’It’s extremely disturbing to hear, directly from the Jarawa, how they are being exploited by unscrupulous outsiders and given alcohol and marijuana to lure and exploit Jarawa women. Not only are these substances being used to take sexual advantage of vulnerable women and girls, but they also risk creating a dangerous dependency which would be devastating for the tribe.

‘It is essential that those responsible be prosecuted and that any officials who have colluded, or turned a blind eye to these activities, must also be investigated and punished.’


Boa Snr was the last of the Bo. Her tribe was decimated by diseases introduced by British colonizers.© Alok Das

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
World Headlines

 


$1 Billion In Reparations For Iraq's Invasion Of Kuwait

UN Panel Pays Out Over $1 Billion in Reparations for Iraq's Invasion of Kuwait More>>

UN-Backed Tsunami Warning System Test

A view of the destruction caused by the Indian Ocean tsunami of 26 December 2004 in Point Pedro, a small fishing village in northern Sri Lanka. UN Photo/Evan Schneider More>>

Al Jazeera To Mark 300 Days Since Arrests Of Journalists

• 300 second montage to mark 300 days to be aired on Al Jazeera • Parents of Peter Greste say the past 300 days has been stressful Doha , 23 October, 2014 More>>

4 Months’ Jail For French Journos Should Be Enough

'We hope it will be a lesson for foreigners to not violate their visas in Indonesia.' More>>

Support Needed For Olive Farmers In Palestinian Territory

Olive trees in the Palestinian town of Ni'lin in 2008 were very close to expanding Israeli settlements. Photo: IRIN/Shabtai Gold More>>

ALSO:

Use Of Drones In Law Enforcement May Violate Human Rights

22 October 2014 – The increasing use of armed drones within domestic law enforcement risks depersonalizing the use of force and infringing upon the rights of individual citizens, a United Nations independent human rights expert warned today. More>>

Gaza: Pledges For Aid, Reconstruction Must Be Honoured

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (left) addresses the Security Council meeting on the situation in the Middle East, including the Palestinian question. Security Council President for the month of October, María Cristina Perceval of Argentina, is at ... More>>

Ebola: UN Prepares For Arrival Of Trial Vaccines

In early October 2014, with the help of the US Navy, a new mobile laboratory opened at Island Clinic, one of the WHO-supported Ebola Treatment Units (ETU) in Monrovia, Liberia. Photo: WHO/R. Sørenson More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
World
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news