World Video | Defence | Foreign Affairs | Natural Events | Trade | NZ in World News | NZ National News Video | NZ Regional News | Search

 


Save the Children hails passage of global food aid reform

WESTPORT, Conn. (February 4, 2014) — Save the Children praised the reforms to U.S. global food aid included in the Agriculture Act of 2014, which passed the Senate today and will next head to the President to sign, saying these changes are good for kids. According to Save the Children, the reforms will help food aid more efficiently and effectively tackle child hunger and malnutrition.

"Save the Children is pleased to see that our nation's leaders worked across party lines to put the interests of malnourished children first by reforming U.S. international food aid. We applaud the efforts of the Farm Bill conferees and their staff, in particular Senators Stabenow (D-MI) and Cochran (R-MS) and Representatives Royce (R-CA), Engel (D-NY) and Marino (R-PA). The relatively modest but important changes to global food aid passed in the Farm Bill are a critical first step," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. "The reforms will provide considerable cost savings, resulting in more aid to more children, greater flexibility to use the most appropriate approach available to assist people in need, and faster humanitarian response times."

The Farm Bill includes two major provisions that support the principles of reform to global food aid. First, the bill created a permanent local and regional procurement program under the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) that allows food to be sourced closer to where it is needed. Funding for the program was authorized up to $80 million per year, compared to the pilot program that was funded $60 million over five years.

Secondly, the bill increased the allowance to use cash-based resources, such as food vouchers, cash transfers and local and regional procurement to 20 percent from 13 percent. The 7 percent increase means that the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), which works through anti-hunger groups like Save the Children, will now have more flexibility to choose the most efficient and appropriate approach to delivering food to children and families in need. This seemingly minor change means that hundreds of thousands more children and families will have access to U.S. food aid than before, and at no additional cost to U.S. taxpayers.

"Children need the right food at the right time to thrive. When children are malnourished, every day counts. Lacking the proper nutrients, children's bodies become vulnerable to life-threatening illnesses, and their growth and brain development is compromised," said Miles. "That is why these changes are significant for children. The reforms mean that the U.S. government and groups like Save the Children can choose the right tool to get food to children faster than it takes today."

"Save the Children looks forward to working with the Administration and Congress to swiftly put these cost- and time-saving reform provisions into place and to continuing to push to modernize our U.S. food aid program. The health and survival of millions of children depend on it," said Miles. "We owe it to the American taxpayers to utilize every dollar to its maximum benefit in the fight against child hunger and malnutrition."

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
World Headlines

 

Gordon Campbell: On How Obama’s Supreme Court Choice Says Everything (Bad) About His Presidency

Nothing has epitomised the presidency of Barack Obama quite like his Supreme Court nominees. Time and again, Republican presidents will blithely nominate right wing ideological extremists (Antonin Scalia, Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas) who only sometimes misfire and turn out to be liberals in disguise (David Souter). Yet Obama has consistently skipped over the judicially qualified liberals and gone for a succession of centrists... More>>

ALSO:

Turkey: UN Secretary-General On The Terrorist Bombing In Ankara

The Secretary-General condemns the terrorist attack in Ankara earlier today. According to the latest reports, the explosion in the Kizilay district killed and wounded dozens of people. More>>

ALSO:

Five Years On: Fukushima And New Zealand

Science Media Centre: It was the worst nuclear event since Chernobyl. In the wake of the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, a crippled Japanese nuclear powerplant went into meltdown, and the world watched as emergency workers scrambled to shut down and contain the reactors. More>>

ALSO:

UNICEF: 1 In 3 Syrian Children Has Grown Up Knowing Only Crisis

An estimated 3.7 million Syrian children – 1 in 3 of all Syrian children - have been born since the conflict began five years ago, their lives shaped by violence, fear and displacement, according to a UNICEF report. This figure includes more than 151,000 children born as refugees since 2011. More>>

ALSO:

Franklin Lamb: Syria’s Truce Bodes Well For Salvaging Our Cultural Heritage

The tentative cessation of hostilities in Syria, which came into effect on 2/28/2016, brokered by Washington and Moscow, is only in its second week... It is well documented that there have been daily incidents of artillery shelling, airstrikes and clashes. Yet, for the nearly 12 million displaced civilians, half of Syria’s population, it’s a much welcomed respite. More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Rubio’s Last Stand (And Sleater-Kinney)

Well, it certainly was entertaining to watch Rubio succeed in getting under Donald Trump’s skin the other day, in the last debate before tomorrow’s Super Tuesday multi-state sweepstakes... The real killer for Rubio was that the most recent poll from Florida which shows him losing his home state to Trump by a huge margin in the primary due on March 15. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
World
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news