World Video | Defence | Foreign Affairs | Natural Events | Trade | NZ in World News | NZ National News Video | NZ Regional News | Search


Government could shut down Parliamentary debate on Bill C-13

April 28, 2014

Government attempts to shut down debate on Online Spying Bill show they’re running scared of public opinion, says

Government could shut down Parliamentary debate on Bill C-13 as early as today

The government looks likely to shut down debate on its controversial Online Spying Bill C-13, which MPs are scheduled to discuss later today. The move comes after tens of thousands have spoken out on a pro-privacy petition organized by and a huge nationwide 50 organization Protect our Privacy coalition. If the government succeeds, this could be the last day of 2nd Reading debate on the bill, which is being driven forward by Justice Minister Peter MacKay.

Bill C-13 sparked immediate controversy after experts revealed how over 60 pages of the bill were lifted from Vic Toews’ failed online spying Bill C-30, which the government was forced to withdraw after Canadians spoke out against it. Experts say that Bill C-13 would give a wide range of authorities access to the private lives of law-abiding Canadians. The bill grants legal immunity to telecom providers who hand over Canadians’ private information without a warrant, as has already happened over 18,000 times in the case of just a single government agency last year.

“This government is running scared of Canadians including those in their own party, and that’s why they’re trying to ram this bill through Parliament with as little debate as possible,” says Executive Director Steve Anderson. “This is a disgraceful approach that is typical of a government with such a terrible track record on privacy, and it’s no wonder that so many people, including many grassroots conservative supporters, are speaking out.”

Anderson continued: “Let’s be clear about what Bill C-13 would do. It would open the door to unprecedented warrantless surveillance of law-abiding Canadians. It would give government bureaucrats access to our private lives at any time without judicial oversight. It would even encourage telecom providers to hand over our private information without a warrant and without even telling victims that their privacy had been violated. Peter MacKay needs to listen to Canadians and rethink this dangerous legislation.”

Privacy expert Professor Michael Geist has highlighted how Bill C-13 “establishes a new system for voluntary disclosure of personal information that is likely to lead both to increased requests without court oversight and to increased disclosures”.

A hard-hitting video about Bill C-13 was launched recently by OpenMedia and rapidly went viral, getting over 12,000 views and securing the top two spots of Reddit Canada.

Tens of thousands of Canadians are calling for effective legal measures to protect our privacy from government surveillance at


© Scoop Media

World Headlines


Haiti: $5 Million To Kick-Start Aid In Wake Of Hurricane Matthew

UN emergency fund allocates $5 million to kick-start assistance in wake of Hurricane Matthew More>>


Not Helen Clark: António Guterres Favourite For Next UN Secretary-General

Former Portuguese Prime Minister António Guterres has emerged as the clear favourite to become the next United Nations Secretary-General following the sixth secret ballot held today by the UN Security Council, which is expected to take a formal decision tomorrow and forward Mr. Guterres’ name to the 193-Member General Assembly for final confirmation. More>>


Preliminary Results: MH17 Investigation Report

The Joint Investigation Team (JIT) is convinced of having obtained irrefutable evidence to establish that on 17 July 2014, flight MH-17 was shot down by a BUK missile from the 9M38-series. According to the JIT there is also evidence identifying the launch location that involves an agricultural field near Pervomaiskyi which, at the time, was controlled by pro-Russian fighters. More>>


At The UN: Paris Climate Agreement Moves Closer To Entry Into Force

The Paris Agreement on climate change moved closer toward entering into force in 2016 as 31 more countries joined the agreement today at a special event hosted by United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. More>>



Gordon Campbell: On The End Game In Spain (And Other World News)

The coverage of international news seems almost entirely dependent on a random selection of whatever some overseas news agency happens to be carrying overnight... Here are a few interesting international stories that have largely flown beneath the radar this past week. More>>

Amnesty/Human Rights Watch: Appalling Abuse, Neglect Of Refugees On Nauru

Refugees and asylum seekers on Nauru, most of whom have been held there for three years, routinely face neglect by health workers and other service providers who have been hired by the Australian government, as well as frequent unpunished assaults by local Nauruans. More>>


Other Australian Detention

Get More From Scoop

Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news