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Humanitarian situation in the Gaza Strip

Humanitarian situation in the Gaza Strip - 16 July 2014

· There was a continuous flow of food, medicines and fuels from Israel into the Gaza Strip through the crossings on Wednesday (16 July), with a total number of 94 trucks crossing into Gaza.

· Although an Israeli civilian was killed yesterday (15 July) by a Hamas mortar shell at the Erez Crossing, it remained open. Staff of international organizations used the Erez Crossing into Gaza as well as journalists.

· Two out of the ten high-power lines that Israel uses to provide electricity to Gaza were hit yesterday by Hamas rockets. The Israeli Electricity Corporation (IEC), which provides power to Gaza, will not be able to repair the two lines due to the immediate threat to the lives of its technicians when doing repairs in open areas subject to frequent rocket attack.

· No shortage of drinking water was reported in the Gaza Strip

ends

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