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Want the Fastest Maserati Sold in New Zealand? Move Quickly!

If You Want the Fastest Maserati Sold in New Zealand – You Will Need to Move Very Quickly!

It’s here, the fastest Maserati ever sold in New Zealand has arrived, but the Maserati GranTurismo MC Stradale is leaving showrooms as quickly as it appeared and with just a strictly limited number available, securing one means moving almost as quickly as the latest Maserati itself!


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“From the moment it was announced we have had enthusiasts wanting to get behind the wheel of the first production Maserati to break the 300 kmh barrier,” says Glen Sealey, General Manager of Maserati Australia and New Zealand. “The Maserati GranTurismo has already been praised for its performance, driving experience, style, features and equipment With the GranTurismo MC Stradale not only has the sound of its fabulous engine reached a new crescendo, so has the praise for this unique and exclusive Maserati Coupe from those already lucky enough to have slipped into its carbon fibre racing seats, grasped its leather coated steering wheel, engaged gears with its carbon fibre paddles and pressed its aluminium racing accelerator pedal.”

“Existing Maserati owners have been attracted to the MC Stradale by how it has taken all the things that they adore about the GranTurismo to a new level, while prospective owners have discovered it provides what is almost an automotive holy grail – a car that has the power, handling and ability to cut the mustard as a track day car but also the refinement, comfort and luxury of a performance coupe. In the past it has been a case of either/or, with the Maserati GranTurismo MC Stradale it’s a definitive ‘and’ to produce a uniquely capable performance car on and off the race track,” explains Mr Sealey.

Powered by a new variant of the Maserati 4.7 litre V8 engine that pumps out 331 kW and 510 Nm of torque, the Maserati GranTurismo MC Stradale demolishes the dash to 100 kmh in 4.6 seconds before hitting, where legally permitted, a top speed of 301 kmh. Yet, at the same time, it is 13 per cent more economical than the normal Maserati GranTurismo S above which it sits in the Maserati line-up.

Changes have been made throughout the Maserati GranTurismo S to transform it into the MC Stadale. Its race-bred heritage is highlighted by a 110 kg weight reduction from the GranTurismo S, with its dry weight down to 1670 kg. It mirrors the advantages Maserati has in racing by retaining the optimal 48%/52% weight distribution to ensure handling balance and even tyre wear.

The Maserati GranTurismo MC Stadale uses advanced electronics to slash gear-shift times from the upgraded MC Race Shift electro-actuated transaxle gearbox to just 60 milliseconds. It is also the first Maserati in history to have a dedicated Race mode to add to its upgraded Automatic and Sport modes in a simplified dash layout. It produces more aerodynamic down force without producing more aerodynamic drag, it produces more power without using more fuel and it is more agile.

The GranTurismo has long been praised for its refinement and while extensive changes have been made to the suspension, which is lower and fitted with larger anti-roll bars; this has been done without sacrificing the GranTurismo S’s highly praised ride quality.


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With the removal of the rear seats, it is the first two-seat Maserati since the MC12 and has also benefited from new Brembo carbon-ceramic brakes, custom-developed Pirelli tyres, a unique suspension layout and carbon-fibre, race-inspired seats.

Visually, the GranTurismo MC Stradale has changes made to the front and rear bumpers, the front guards, the bonnet and the boot lid, aimed at boosting down force and aiding engine and brake cooling. Inside materials derived from the racing variants, in the shape of carbon fibre and Alcantara, are used extensively. Carbon fibre racing seats are standard and the instrument pack has been changed to allow for the changes to the car’s dynamic systems.

The result of these changes is to produce a car with three distinct characters. In race mode, the MC Stradale is poised and ready for track days or the most demanding roads with every response and element of the car finessed to the highest level for instant response. In Sport mode the epic performance is fully available but delivered in a more subtle manner, making it suitable for everyday use, with the responses of a thoroughbred sports car and the comfort of a continent-swallowing grand touring car. Auto mode is, to all extents and purposes, stealth mode, with the performance and ability available but hiding behind a veil of relaxed comfort, quietness and refinement.


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Available in limited numbers, deliveries of the Maserati GranTurismo MC Stradale have now begun with a recommended retail price of $350,000, excluding statutory charges, on road costs and dealer delivery charges.


Changes to the Maserati GranTurismo to transform it into the MC Stradale

Exterior Changes
o Air intakes on the bonnet
o New side skirts
o New front bumper with new aerodynamic splitter
o Integrated boot lid lip spoiler
o Revised rear bumper with Splitter
o Exhaust pipes reposition to allow larger rear splitter
o New front guards with trailing edge vertical air vents
o 20 inch wheels with new Pirelli P-zero Corse tyres
Interior Changes
o Front carbon fibre seats
o Alcantara and leather upholstery
o Redesigned main instrument cluster
Weight reduced by 110 kg
o Flow formed 20 inch alloy wheels: - 5 kg
o Wiring optimisation: - 2 kg
o Sound insulation reduction: - 25 kg
o Two seat configuration: - 16 kg
o Carbon Fibre front seats: - 26 kg
o Sealing and body optimisation: - 12 kg
o Carbon Ceramic Brembo brakes: - 18 kg
o Exhaust System: - 6 kg
Aerodynamic improvements
o Front: 25% more down force at 200 kmh
o Rear: 50% more down force at 200 kmh
o No change in the drag co-efficient, despite extra down force
New Driving modes
o Race
Gearchanges in 60 milliseconds
Gearchange mode: Manual shift
Exhaust silencer by pass: Open at all engine speeds
Sequential Downshifting
Sharper response from the accelerator
o Sport
Gearchanges in 100 milliseconds
Gearchange mode: Manual shift
Exhaust silencer by pass: Open over 4000 rpm
o Auto
Gearchanges in 140 milliseconds
Gearchange mode: Automatic shift
Exhaust silencer by pass: Closed
Engine, compared to GranTurismo S
o Up 7 kW to 331 kW
o Up 20 Nm to 510 Nm
o Fuel consumption: down 13% to 14.4 l/100 km
o 80% of torque available from 2500 rpm
o Diamond Like Coating (DLC) cuts internal engine friction
Suspension/Chassis
o 8% stiffer springs
o Front roll bar increased from 20 to 25 mm
o Ride height lowered
10 mm at the front
12 mm at the rear
o Tyres – new Pirelli P-Zero Corsa
Front: Up from 245/35 to 255/35
Rear: Up from 285/35 to 295/35
Brakes – New Brembo Carbon Ceramic
o First production Maserati with Carbon Ceramic brakes
o New brake cooling system and heat extraction vents
o Front: 380 mm x 34 mm with six piston callipers
o Rear: 360 mm x 32 mm with four piston callipers
o Braking distance, down 6% for 100 kmh to Zero, now 33 metres

ENDS

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