Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 

Still too many drivers taking risks at level crossings

13 August 2012

Still too many drivers taking risks at level crossings

A reduction in the number of crashes between vehicles and trains at level crossings is an encouraging sign but there is still room for improvement, says the AA.

Today marks the launch of Rail Safety Week and this year’s message is “use your brain, tracks are for trains”. The campaign is focussing on reducing the amount of trespassing and pedestrians who dangerously walk across railway tracks but the message is just as valid for motorists.

There are about 1400 level crossing on public roads in New Zealand and many drivers will have to cross train tracks on a regular basis. About half of these crossings have some form of electronic warning system like flashing lights, bells or barrier arms but there are still on average about 26 crashes a year between cars and trains.

The first six months of 2012 have seen fewer than normal crashes between vehicles and trains at level crossings with 7 but there has still been 86 reported near misses.

“Crashes between cars and trains mainly involve a driver either not seeing the train or trying to beat one across the tracks,” says AA spokesperson Dylan Thomsen.

“Whenever a driver is approaching a level crossing they need to be double checking for trains and ready to stop. A quick glance just isn’t enough. Trains can’t swerve to avoid a collision or stop – so it’s up to the driver to play it safe every time.”

Because of their size, trains can often seem to be travelling slower than they actually are. So it is crucial that, as well as always thoroughly looking for trains, drivers never go through a crossing if the warning signals are on or they can see a train approaching.

“People can think they have enough time to dart across, but they don’t realise how fast the train is going. Unbelievably, sometimes drivers can even be seen going around barrier arms to try and beat a train.

“It’s absolutely black and white. Tracks are for trains and if you’re at a level crossing and there is a train coming, or the warning signals are on, then drivers need to stop, end of story.

“It’s good to see that there has been a drop in the number of crashes between vehicles and trains so far this year but 86 near collisions shows there are still far too many people taking huge risks.

“As a country our target should be to have no crashes at level crossings and drivers need to play their part by always looking twice for trains and being a bit more patient at level crossings.”

Railway crossing safety tips for motorists

1. Always slow down and look both ways when approaching a crossing

2. Never try to beat a train across the tracks

3. Always stop and wait if the red lights are flashing or barrier arms have come down

4. Do not overtake a vehicle that is slowing down or stopping at a crossing

5. Only enter a crossing if there is enough space for your vehicle to fully exit it on the other side

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines



Gordon Campbell: On Covid Vaccine Inequality, Plus Cowboy Bebop


Plainly, the Big Pharma model – where vaccine development, distribution, and pricing is left in the hands of the private sector - is not fit for purpose when it comes to meeting the global challenge of Covid vaccine coverage. Last week, Amnesty International released a major report on how the global response to the pandemic is only accentuating the inequalities... More>>

Covid-19, 27/9: 1,160 Overall Cases, 5,000,000+ Vaccine Doses


12 new cases have been discovered in Auckland, currently at Level 3. 948 of the Auckland cases have recovered alongside all of the Wellington cases... More>>

ALSO:




 
 

Wellington Council: Mayor Suggests UK-style Arts-sector Insurance Scheme
It’s time New Zealand thought about an arts and events sector insurance scheme, not unlike that in the United Kingdom, says Wellington Mayor Andy Foster. His call follows the cancellation of the World of WearableArts 2021 show... More>>

Government: Next Steps To Improve Safety In Wake Of Whakaari White Island Tragedy
The Government is moving to improve safety in light of the Whakaari White Island tragedy and has released proposals to reinforce safety standards in registered adventure activities... More>>

Government: Expert Group Appointed To Lead New Zealand’s Future Health System
An outstanding group of people with extensive and wide-ranging governance and health experience have been appointed to lead the Māori Health Authority and Health New Zealand, Health Minister Andrew Little says... More>>

ALSO:

Land Air Water: Two-thirds Of NZ’s Monitored River Sites Ecologically Impaired

Today, the Land, Air, Water Aotearoa (LAWA) project has released the LAWA River Water Quality National Picture Summary 2021, alongside updated river monitoring result histories for more than 1500 individual sites across New Zealand... More>>

Power: Bill Changes Bring Fairness To Charges

A key recommendation of an independent panel to make electricity charges fairer across all households will be put in place, the Energy and Resources Minister Megan Woods has announced... More>>



Government: Parks expiry of licenses, WoFs and regos
As a result of the Delta outbreak, driver licences, Warrants of Fitness (WoFs), Certificates of Fitness (CoFs), vehicle licences (‘regos’) and licence endorsements that expired on or after 21 July 2021 will be valid until 30 November 2021, Transport Minister Michael Wood has announced today... More>>


 
 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

InfoPages News Channels