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Population growth continues

National Population Estimates: September 2000 quarter

Population growth continues

New Zealand's population continues to edge towards the four million mark. The estimated resident population at 30 September 2000 was 3,836,700, Deputy Government Statistician Dianne Macaskill said today. This represents an increase of 20,700 or 0.5 per cent over the 30 September 1999 figure, up slightly on the increase of 18,300 recorded for the year ended 30 September 1999, but is lower than the increases recorded in the early 1990s.

The increase in growth over that of the previous year was due both to a larger natural increase of population (excess of births over deaths) of 30,200, and a smaller permanent and long-term migration loss of 9,500.

The estimated population increase during the September 2000 quarter was 5,700 or about 0.2 per cent. This resulted from a natural increase of 6,600 and a net outflow of 900 through permanent and long-term migration. The corresponding population increases for the September quarters of 1999 and 1998 were a little smaller, both at 5,400. The net population outflows were 1,100 and 2,000 respectively.

Half of the New Zealand population is now over 34.4 years of age, up 3 years on the median age of 31.4 years in 1991. Children under 15 years now make up 22.8 per cent of all New Zealanders, down from 23.1 per cent in 1991. The population aged 65 years and over is currently increasing by approximately 6,000 people per year. There are now 452,000 people aged 65 years and over and they make up 11.8 per cent of the New Zealand population, up from 11.2 per cent in 1991.

Dianne Macaskill DEPUTY GOVERNMENT STATISTICIAN END

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