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2001 Census Snapshot


2001 Census Snapshot

This is one of a series of census snapshots designed to inform New Zealanders of some key findings from the 2001 Census of Population and Dwellings.

Further information is available on our website: http:// http://www.stats.govt.nz.

Overview

Some 698,628 people or 19.5 percent of all New Zealand residents were born overseas, according to figures from the 2001 Census released today by Statistics New Zealand. In the five years between the 1996 and 2001 Censuses, the number of New Zealand residents that were born overseas increased by 15.5 percent. Meanwhile, results from the 2001 Census in Australia showed that 355,765 of their residents were born in New Zealand, accounting for 1.9 percent of the population in that country. In the five years between the 1996 and 2001 Censuses, the number of New Zealand-born residents living in Australia increased by 22.1 percent.

The majority of New Zealand residents born overseas had lived in the country for a number of years, with close to three-quarters having lived here for five years or more. Just 7.5 percent had lived in New Zealand for less than one year.

Around one-third (32.3 percent) of those born overseas came from the United Kingdom and Ireland, one-quarter (24.9 percent) were born in Oceania (primarily Samoa and Australia), and 12.8 percent were born in North-East Asia (primarily China). Close to one-third (30.7 percent) of recent arrivals (less than five years) from North-East Asia were in the 15-24 years age group, and more than half (55.8 percent) of these people said they had participated in a study course in the four weeks preceding the 2001 Census.

People Born Overseas Demographic Characteristics In the 2001 Census, 698,628 people said they were born overseas, up 15.5 percent since the 1996 Census. In comparison, the New Zealand-born population increased by 1.5 percent overthis time period.

In the 10 years between the 1991 and 2001 Censuses, the proportion of the usually resident population that was born overseas increased from 15.8 percent to 19.5 percent.

There was wide variation among the overseas born poulation in terms of the number of years lived in New Zealand, with 40.8 percent having lived here for 20 years or more, 31.6 percent for between 5 and 19 years, and the remaining 27.5 percent having lived here for less than five years. Just 7.5 percent had lived in New Zealand for less than one year.

Close to one-third (32.3 percent) of those born overseas came from the United Kingdom and Ireland. A further 24.9 percent were born in Oceania (primarily Samoa and Australia), and 12.8 percent were born in North-East Asia (primarily China).

Meanwhile, the 2001 Census in Australia showed that 355,765 of their residents were born in New Zealand, accounting for 1.9 percent of the population in that country. In the five years between the 1996 and 2001 Censuses, the number of New Zealand-born residents living in Australia increased by 22.1 percent.

Just 1.4 percent (7,425 people) of those identifying with the Mäori ethnic group were born overseas, and the majority of these people (66.5 percent) were born in Australia.

In the five years between 1996 and 2001, the biggest numeric increase in people born overseas was from those born in North-East Asia (up 28,392 or 46.4 percent). China made the biggest contribution to the increase for North-East Asia (up 19,431), followed by Korea (up 5,748).

Close to one-third (30.7 percent) of recent arrivals (less than five years) from North-East Asia were in the 15-24 years age group, and more than half (55.8 percent) of these people said they had participated in a study course in the four weeks preceding the 2001 Census. This compared with 40.6 percent of 15-24 year olds born in New Zealand.

Data from the New Zealand Immigration Service for the year ended June 2001 shows that 55,715 applications were approved for students (of which 18,271 were from China), 43,779 applications were approved for general residence (25,828 on skilled/business grounds, 14,608 on family sponsored grounds, and 3,343 on international/humanitarian grounds), and 57,111 applications were approved for work (30,650 on non-skill-based criteria and 26,461 on skill-based criteria).

51.5 percent of those born outside New Zealand were women, the same proportion as for the New Zealand-born population (51.2 percent). However, there were marked differences among countries of birth, with 41.2 percent of those born in Pakistan being women, compared with 67.1 percent for those born in the Philippines.

The overseas-born population has a different age structure to the New Zealand born population. At the time of the 2001 Census, 10.7 percent of those born overseas were under 15 years of age (25.8 percent for the New Zealand born population), 73.7 percent were aged 15-64 years (63.2 percent for the New Zealand born population), and 15.6 percent were aged 65 years and over (11.1 percent for the New Zealand born population).

Those born in North Africa and the Middle East had the highest proportions of people under 15 years of age (22.0 percent). Those born in South-East Asia had the highest proportion aged 15-64 years of age (85.2 percent), and the United Kingdom and Ireland – where most migrants came from in the 1950s – had the highest proportion aged 65 years and over (28.7 percent).

Around half of the overseas-born population lived in the Auckland Region, and close to 1 in 10 of the Auckland Region's population had lived in New Zealand for less than five years. A further 12.4 percent of the overseas-born population lived in the Wellington Region, and 9.9 percent lived in the Canterbury Region. Just 7.2 percent of those born overseas lived in rural areas compared with 15.8 percent of the New Zealand-born population.

Other Characteristics Adults born outside New Zealand were more likely than those born in New Zealand to hold educational qualifications (81.3 percent and 69.9 percent respectively). This is likely to be related to the fact that qualifications are often a factor in eligibility for permanent residence in New Zealand. Those born overseas were also more likely to hold degree or higher level qualifications (17.6 percent versus 10.1 percent).

Unemployment rates for those born overseas varied according to the number of years since arrival in New Zealand. Those who had lived in New Zealand less than one year had an unemployment rate of 22.6 percent in the week preceding the 2001 Census. After one year this reduced to 13.3 percent, and between 5 and 9 years it reduced to 10.5 percent.

People born overseas who were in paid employment were more likely than New Zealand-born residents to be working as legislators, administrators and managers; professionals; or technicians and associate professionals. 45.8 percent of those born outside New Zealand worked in one of these three occupational groups compared with 38.2 percent of New Zealand-born residents.

Overall, median incomes were lower for those born outside New Zealand than for those born in New Zealand; however, there was wide variation by country of birth. Those born in sub-Saharan Africa (eg Kenya, Zambia, Zimbabwe and South Africa) received the highest median incomes in the 12 months to March 2001 of $23,300. Those born in North-East Asia (eg Taiwan, Korea, and Hong Kong) received the lowest median incomes of $6,800, reflecting the high proportion of people from this area in the 15-24 years age group.

Median incomes also varied according to number of years in New Zealand, with 49.5 percent of those who had lived in New Zealand less than five years receiving under $10,000 in annual income, compared with 22.0 percent of those who had lived in New Zealand 20 years or longer.

Among those who had lived in New Zealand for less than five years, and could speak, 85.7 percent could speak English. This increased to 98.2 percent among those who had lived in New Zealand for 20 years or more.

People born overseas were less likely to report 'no religion' than those born in New Zealand, with 22.8 percent of the overseas-born population stating that they had no religious affiliation in the 2001 Census, compared with 31.3 percent of those born in New Zealand.

More information These results come from the 2001 Census of Population and Dwellings conducted by Statistics New Zealand.

This release and other 2001 Census releases, along with additional information, are available free on the Statistics New Zealand website: http://www.stats.govt.nz, under "Census 2001".

You are welcome to reproduce and publish this information provided you acknowledge Statistics New Zealand as the source. The counts for this 2001 Census Snapshot are taken from tables prepared for a series of topic-based reports that have been published since 28 March 2002.

The counts for this 2001 Census Snapshot are taken from tables prepared for the People Born Overseas report published 18 October 2002.

To discuss the availability of further information from the 2001 Census or other collections, contact our Information Centre by telephoning:
Auckland 09 920 2100
Wellington 04 931 4600
Christchurch 03 964 8700 or emailing info@stats.govt.nz.
The fifteenth 2001 Census Snapshot – Asian Peoples – will be published on 29 October 2002.

Brian Pink - Government Statistician


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