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New ad demonstrates impact of speed


New ad demonstrates impact of speed

Over a third of fatal road crashes are caused by excessive speed, and the latest instalment of New Zealand’s road safety advertising campaign demonstrates why speed kills.

If you crash while driving at 125 km/h the impact on your body is the same as falling from the ninth floor of a building.

When a car crashes at excessive speed, it’s not the speed that kills; it is the sudden stop. On impact, a person’s internal organs are still moving at the same speed as before the crash. The damage sustained is similar to falling from a high rise building.

“The physics of speed are unarguable,” says Land Transport New Zealand Advertising Manager Rachel Prince.

“The faster you’re going, the less time and space you have to react in, and the more severe the injuries to yourself and others. Being a skilful driver does not make you immune to the laws of physics.”

Driving at excessive speed is still the number one killer on our roads. Speeding drivers cause over 150 deaths and 2,500 injuries each year.

Land Transport NZ and the Police are continuing to work together to reduce this toll, through education and enforcement.

The ad goes to air this Sunday (25 September).


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