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Hoggets Boost Sheep Numbers

Agricultural Production Statistics (Provisional): June 2005

Hoggets Boost Sheep Numbers

There were 39.9 million sheep in New Zealand at 30 June 2005, up 1.7 percent from 2004, Statistics New Zealand said today. This is a change from the downward trend for sheep numbers evident since 1982. Provisional results from the 2005 Agricultural Production Survey show the major contributor to the increase was the retention of young breeding stock. The number of ewe hoggets put to ram was 3.2 million in 2005, up 21 percent on 2004.

Deer numbers were down 2.7 percent from the 2004 level, to 1.7 million at 30 June 2005. There were 815,400 female deer mated during the year to 30 June 2005, down 53,500 on the previous year.

The 2005 survey included horticulture, livestock and arable farming, and forestry. Horticulture statistics are collected every second year.

The area planted in wine grapes continues to increase strongly. Between 2003 and 2005 the area increased by 27.4 percent to reach 25,030 hectares. There was also a steady increase in avocado planting, with 3,370 hectares at 30 June 2005, up from 3,240 hectares two years ago.

At 30 June 2005 the area planted in apple trees was estimated at 10,260 hectares, a 15.6 percent decrease since 2003.

Final results from the 2005 Agricultural Production Survey will be available in April 2006.

Brian Pink
Government Statistician

ENDS

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