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Summer Shape-Up Tips by Curves

Summer Shape-Up Tips by Curves
30 Minutes is All You Need

Sydney, January 16, 2008…The heat is on for the annual summer shape-up, and Curves Fitness Centres for Women has the perfect answer: a 30-minute, 3 times a week workout that will have Kiwi women toning up and trimming down for a healthier and happier summer.

A half-hour at Curves is quickly becoming as popular as a tea-break for women who want to get into shape and stay there. With more than 5 million members in 55 countries, Curves, the world’s largest fitness chain really knows about fitness for women. For the past 12 years, Curves has been doing pioneering studies in female fitness. Now, the organisation has committed another $5 million over five years to scientific research on the most effective methods to improve the lives of women.

With 48 gyms and over 12,000 members in New Zealand women can easily find a convenient Curves gym almost anywhere, so there’s no allowing for excuses. To find the closest Curves, call 0800-4-CURVES ( 287837) or visit www.curves.com and click into New Zealand.

Curves Top 10 Tips for getting into shape this summer and building the energy to enjoy the season

Get moving: Any exercise is better than none. Once you start to build up your fitness, you'll be amazed at how quickly you feel the benefits of a healthier body. You’ll have a lot more spring in your step, and the compliments you’ll get will have you wanting to step out even more.

The best exercise program for you…. is one you will stick to: Find a routine that works for you, and make it a habit. Curves’ 30-minute, 3 times a week routine is hugely popular because it’s manageable and the 30 minutes fly by as you change workout stations every 30-seconds.

Work out because YOU want to and make it fun. Go with a friend, or join a place where the environment is welcoming. Curves is like a girls' club, where everyone knows your name, and we all share similar fitness goals. Don’t think of exercise as a duty but as a choice. It’s your time to devote to your body and health because your wellbeing is important to you.

Bigger muscles create a smaller body: In order to increase your metabolism and achieve permanent weight loss, you must increase your muscle mass. Muscle burns calories so you can actually eat more food without gaining weight, and strength training is the only way to do this. You need to lift weights or use other exercise equipment that forces you to work your muscles against resistance so that they work harder than they’re used to. You don't have to spend hours working out to increase muscle mass – 30 minutes three times a week will do it. Aerobics and walking are great for your heart but they don't build muscle mass.

Working out should NEVER be painful: Make sure your workout helps -not hurts you. Hydraulic machines, which Curves uses, put minimal stress on joints and muscles, and are similar to water exercises, allowing you to work as hard as you want without fear of injury. That means exercising at the right level for you, using proper form and resting between workouts. You should feel invigorated after a workout, not exhausted.

Don't be a slouch: Stand or sit up straight at your desk, in the car, when shopping! Hold your head up high, and tighten your belly. This also goes for when you are working out. The more muscles you use during any activity, the more fat burning your body will do.

Stretch: Stretch in the morning and at night to warm the body up, and relax it after a long day. Stretching the muscles lengthens them and allows them to heal stronger and be more limber. Try to relax while stretching, use visualisation or listen to soothing music; a state of relaxation will increase your range of motion. Even when not working out, daily stretching keeps you limber.

Take up drinking….Water: Water acts a natural diuretic, and helps flush out your systems of toxins. It rehydrates the body and is great for skin, hair, and general health and wellbeing. Coffee, tea, juices and sodas don't count, you need 8 glasses of pure water a day.

Think small: Set small, specific goals. Goals like ‘losing weight’ or ‘gaining muscle’ are too general. Be more specific - reaching a certain dress size, losing 5 kg. Break your goals into smaller chunks so you can see the results. Exercise is one area where you can really see and feel success. Then take pride in your accomplishments and reward yourself. You did it!

Keep track: Chart your progress to keep track of your workouts and improvements. Whether it's fat loss, building muscle tissue or just feeling better, keeping a log will motivate you. When you see where you are and how far you've come, you'll realise you're making progress and you'll continue!

And here's an important extra tip - It's never too late to start! Exercise slows the effect of aging. Even after 50, exercise can add healthy and active years to one's life and lower health risks. Resistance training is important for older people because it is the only form of exercise that can slow and can even reverses the decline in muscle mass, bone density and strength. Flexibility exercises help reduce the stiffness and loss of balance that accompanies aging, and speed and agility is increased as well. Not to mention that mature women who exercise more are shown to have smaller waists!

ENDS

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