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Food prices fall 0.6 percent in November

Embargoed until 10:45am – 13 December 2010 Food prices fall 0.6 percent in November

Food prices fell 0.6 percent in the November 2010 month reflecting lower vegetable prices, Statistics New Zealand said today. This follows a 2.2 percent increase in October when food prices were affected by the rise in GST, and a 0.7 percent increase in September.

Vegetable prices fell 9.9 percent in November. "Lettuce, tomato, and broccoli prices fell in November, as they usually do. However, prices are much higher than this time last year, reflecting poor weather in September and October," Statistics New Zealand prices manager Chris Pike said.

Grocery food prices were flat (up 0.1 percent) in November 2010. This follows a 1.7 percent rise in October, when about half the prices collected that were not affected by discounting rose 2.0 to 2.5 percent (reflecting the GST rise).

Restaurant meals and ready-to-eat food prices rose 0.6 percent in November 2010, following a 1.9 percent rise in October.

In the year to November 2010, food prices rose 4.8 percent. All subgroups made upward contributions, with the most significant coming from grocery food (up 5.0 percent) and fruit and vegetables (up 11.9 percent). The remaining three subgroups recorded higher prices: restaurant meals and ready-to-eat food (up 3.6 percent), non-alcoholic beverages (up 3.2 percent), and meat, poultry, and fish (up 1.1 percent).

Geoff Bascand 13 December 2010
Government Statistician

ENDS

FoodPriceIndexNov10HOTP.pdf
fpinov10tables.xls

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