Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

Don’t let velvetleaf hitch a ride on Gypsy Day

Don’t let velvetleaf hitch a ride on Gypsy Day

Date: 26 May 2016

This Gypsy Day, farmers are being urged to avoid moving the invasive pest weed velvetleaf along with their stock.

June 1 marks the first day of the new dairying season where thousands of sharemilkers load their cows into stock trucks or herd stock on roads and move equipment and families to new farms.

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) cautions that the mass movement of stock and equipment could also move velvetleaf seed to other properties.

“Seeds from this invasive weed can be moved to new locations in cattle dung, in their hooves and on farm equipment,” Response Incident Controller David Yard says.

“There are some simple management measures farmers can employ now to reduce this risk, but the key is the ‘now’.”

Mr Yard says if cows have been grazing fodder beet crops where velvetleaf is present, it is important they are moved off those crops at least 24 hours before Gypsy Day.

“In fact, ideally we recommend that stock do not graze weed-infested areas within three days of their move. By keeping stock out of infested areas for those last three days, it will allow time for them to empty out before transfer."

“Farmers are also encouraged to stand stock off green feed before they are transported because that generates less effluent and reduces the risk of effluent ending up on roads and in waterways. Ensure stock have access to water and dry feed at this time.”

The Ministry also recommends stock movements are recorded for up to a week after they are moved out of velvetleaf infested grazing so that these areas can be monitored in future for any sign of velvetleaf growth.

“Farmers should advise stock truck operators that there could potentially be seed contamination present in stock truck effluent and this effluent must be disposed of in an approved effluent disposal site."

“It is also important that good machinery hygiene is practised anytime a machine is moved between infected properties. Remove all visible soil and plant matter that might spread velvetleaf, including equipment used to lift a fodder beet crop, transport an infested fodder beet crop or cultivate a new crop on previously infested paddocks.”


ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Stats NZ: Consents For New Homes At All-Time High

A record 41,028 new homes have been consented in the year ended March 2021, Stats NZ said today. The previous record for the annual number of new homes consented was 40,025 in the year ended February 1974. “Within 10 years the number of new homes ... More>>

Stats NZ: Unemployment Declines As Underutilisation Rises

The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate decreased to 4.7 percent in the March 2021 quarter, continuing to fall from its recent peak of 5.2 percent in the September 2020 quarter but remaining high compared with recent years, Stats NZ said today. ... More>>

ALSO:

Digitl: The Story Behind Vodafone’s FibreX Court Ruling

Vodafone’s FibreX service was in the news this week. What is the story behind the Fair Trading Act court case? More>>

Reserve Bank: Concerned About New Zealand's Rising House Prices

New Zealand house prices have risen significantly in the past 12 months. This has raised concerns at the Reserve Bank of New Zealand – Te Putea Matua about the risk this poses to financial stability. Central banks responded swiftly to the global ... More>>

Westpac: Announces Strong Financial Result

Westpac New Zealand (Westpac NZ) [i] says a strong half-year financial result has been driven by better than expected economic conditions. Chief Executive David McLean said while the global COVID-19 pandemic was far from over, the financial effect on ... More>>

MYOB: SME Confidence In Economic Performance Still Cautious

New insights from the annual MYOB Business Monitor have shown the SME sector is still cautious about the potential for further economic recovery, with two-in-five (41%) expecting the New Zealand economy to decline this year. The latest research ... More>>