Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

NZ venison prices rise amid tight supply

Thursday 07 July 2016 11:47 AM

NZ venison prices rise amid tight supply as farmers rebuild herds

By Tina Morrison

July 7 (BusinessDesk) - New Zealand meat processors are having to pay more to secure supply of local venison to service their overseas contracts as farmers retain their breeding hinds to rebuild herds.

Spot prices for a 60-kilogram AP stag have hit $7.85/kg, up from $6.60/kg this time last year and the highest level for this time of year since 2011, according to AgriHQ. Venison production dropped 36 percent in May from the year earlier month, and is down 23 percent in the processing season so far, from Oct.1 through May 31, according to AgriHQ.

New Zealand deer numbers have almost halved over the past decade and are at their lowest level in 26 years as farmers switched to more profitable sheep and dairy farming. However, recent weakness in dairy and sheepmeat markets is stoking renewed interest in the deer industry, where an improved outlook for venison is prompting farmers to retain their breeding hinds to rebuild their herds, creating a shortage of supply for meat processors and pushing up prices.

"What’s happening now is we are seeing the venison profitability much higher than competing land uses," said Rachel Agnew, an agricultural analyst at AgriHQ's iFarm. "That’s triggered people to want to get back into the industry so we have seen a large reduction in the number of hinds being slaughtered which is having an impact on overall production.

"We are seeing some quite heated procurement competition in this venison processing space."

Agnew said venison exporters were wary of avoiding the previous "boom bust" cycle seen in 2011 when prices rose higher than buyers were prepared to pay, causing a slump in the market.

"The prices got too high, it was priced out of the market in the EU and the market pretty much collapsed following that," she said. "Exporters are trying very hard not to have a repeat of that situation.

"The global protein market at the moment is awash with cheap protein. There’s a lot of pork and poultry that’s very cheap so you have to be very careful not to overprice a protein in comparison to those because restaurants will take it off the menu if it gets too expensive," she said. "There’s a bit of a fine line there that’s being walked between being able to ask really high prices from the market because of the short supply and pricing the product off the menu."

Meat processors have started offering attractive supply contracts for as much as $9.80/kg in an attempt to secure venison for the traditional European chilled export season through September and October with some also extending the offer through until March, she said.

"It’s great for farmers, they are getting some fantastic prices," Agnew said. "But if you are looking at the big picture, while it’s really good for farmers, there is a battle going on at the market end to preserve those prices and make them sustainable as opposed to seeing what we saw in 2011 where the prices got too high and the market collapsed and then deer farmers went through a period of low prices as a result of that market collapsing, so to keep those prices sustainable at the market end, New Zealand exporters are walking a fine line there."

Agnew noted an appreciation in the kiwi against the European common currency following the UK's decision last month to leave the European Union was also likely to squeeze processor margins for venison.

(BusinessDesk)

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Fuels Rushing In: Govt "Ready To Act" On Petrol Market Report

The Government will now take the Commerce Commission’s recommendations to Cabinet...
• A more transparent wholesale pricing regime • Greater contractual freedoms and fairer terms • Introducing an enforceable industry code of conduct • Improve transparency of premium grade fuel pricing... More>>

ALSO:

Reserve Bank Capital Review Decision: Increased Bank Capital Requirements

Governor Adrian Orr said the decisions to increase capital requirements are about making the banking system safer for all New Zealanders, and will ensure bank owners have a meaningful stake in their businesses. More>>

ALSO:

Aerospace: Christchurch Plan To Be NZ's Testbed

Christchurch aims to be at the centre of New Zealand’s burgeoning aerospace sector by 2025, according to the city’s aerospace strategic plan. More>>

ALSO:

EPA: Spill Sees Abatement Notice Served For Tamarind Taranaki

The notice was issued after a “sheen” on the sea surface was reported to regulators on Thursday 21 November, approximately 400 metres from the FPSO Umuroa. A survey commissioned by Tamarind has subsequently detected damage to the flowline connecting the Umuroa to the Tui 2H well. More>>

Taskforce Report: Changes Recommended For Winter Grazing

A Taskforce has made 11 recommendations to improve animal welfare in intensive winter grazing farm systems, the Minister of Agriculture Damien O’Connor confirmed today. More>>

ALSO: