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Sky TV, Vocus in war of words over piracy website ban

Sky TV, Vocus in war of words over piracy website ban

By Sophie Boot

Nov. 29 (BusinessDesk) - Sky Network Television, New Zealand's biggest pay-TV operator, has asked the courts to force internet providers Spark, Vodafone, Vocus and Two Degrees to prevent consumers accessing free streaming sites such as The Pirate Bay, but at least one provider is fighting back.

In an application to the High Court from September this year, Sky asked for an injunction on the four providers, who collectively hold about 90 percent of New Zealand's internet market, saying it was necessary to protect and enforce its rights and the orders sought "are in the interests of justice."

Sky said it has exclusive licensee of copyright in various valuable works including films, television programmes and sporting broadcasts, and has paid substantial amounts for the exclusive right to show the works in New Zealand. Free streaming sites "reproduce and make available for free, high quality unauthorised copies" of those works, and infringe on copyright and Sky's legal rights, it said.

Sky said courts in other countries have ordered providers to disable access to the target websites on grounds of copyright infringement, and the impact on individuals would be "minimal and proportionate" as restricting access to the target websites "would not restrict access by internet users to legitimate online content."

Vocus, which runs Orcon, Slingshot and Flip, said the move was "gross censorship and a breach of net neutrality."

"It isn’t our job to police the internet and it sure as hell isn’t Sky’s either, all sites should be equal and open," said Vocus consumer general manager Taryn Hamilton. "Delivering a competitive commercial alternative to piracy is the best way to fight piracy.

"The success of Netflix, iTunes and Spotify proves that people are willing to pay to access good-quality content. It’s pretty clear that Sky doesn’t understand the internet, and is trying a Hail Mary to turnaround its sunset business."

Vocus said its statistics show New Zealand interest in The Pirate Bay has less than halved since Netflix launched in New Zealand. Today, traffic to The Pirate Bay is only 23 per cent of its 2013 peak, and Netflix has fast become the largest content provider in the country, it said.

In August, Sky posted a 21 percent decline in annual profit to $116 million as content costs increased, and revenue and subscriber numbers fell. The pay-TV operator faces increased rivalry from online streaming video services such as Netflix and has seen its subscriber base come under pressure while its programming costs continue to rise. Its costs to secure programming rights increased 5.6 percent to $349.4 million in the latest year.

Meanwhile, its subscriber numbers fell 3.3 percent to 824,782, with residential subscription revenue down 3.7 percent to $725.1 million, due to fewer satellite customers and a lower uptake of premium services such as sports and movies and lower pay-per-view buys. Increased subscribers for its subscription video-on-demand service Neon and sports service Fan Pass helped 'other subscription revenue' increase 3.7 percent to $82.2 million.

In response, Sky said that 42 countries around the world have laws allowing the banning of "blatant piracy sites" by internet providers, including Australia, the UK, Singapore, many countries in the EU - "and if anything New Zealand is lagging behind in our legal protection for content creators and legitimate content businesses."

"We are talking about websites that are designed for no other purpose than to illegally pirate content," Sky said. "This is not about a 'breach of equality and freedom of information' – it’s about calling out pirate sites who pay nothing to the creators of movies, TV and sport content and simply steal it for their own gain.

"Sky is not 'taking it upon ourselves to make censorship calls'. We are proposing to follow a thorough and careful legal process, which involves seeking a court order under the Copyright Act that requires ISPs to block specified infringing sites.

"Vocus’ claims that we’re attempting censorship are nonsense, and demonstrate that Vocus is out of touch with what is happening around the world – not to mention that they seem to be wanting to align their brand with pirates who steal content," Sky said.

In an emailed statement, Vodafone said it was aware of the order Sky intends to seek, and "would of course comply with any court order." Spark was not immediately available for comment.

Sky said in its application that it has consulted with the providers over the orders sought, and "has done everything practicable to accommodate the ISPs’ requests and suggestions on the orders."

(BusinessDesk)

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