Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

Entries open for the New Zealand Building Industry Awards


Entries open for the New Zealand Building Industry Awards

Entries for the revised New Zealand Institute of Building (NZIOB) Awards, now known as the New Zealand Building Industry Awards, close on Friday, 11 May 2018.

To mark the 25th anniversary of their awards programme, the NZIOB has introduced two new categories: a Consultants Award and an Interdisciplinary Collaboration Award, and renamed the event the ‘New Zealand Building Industry Awards’.

NZIOB chief executive Malcolm Fleming said, “The new name and categories clearly identify that the awards programme is open to all the occupations involved in the New Zealand building industry, and to broaden the awards appeal beyond primarily recognising project managers running commercial construction projects. What hasn’t changed is the awards focus on acknowledging and celebrating building industry practitioners behind New Zealand’s most successful building projects.

“Established in 1994, these awards are now open to anyone in the building industry and are judged by a panel of experts from the industry.”

The revised awards have eleven categories: six are defined by the scale and cost of the project and can be entered by individuals or teams working on construction projects. The six cost-based category awards are the:
Resene projects under $2.5 Million Award;
Steel Construction NZ projects $2.5 - $5 Million Award;
Hilti NZ projects $5 - $10 Million Award;
Colorsteel® projects $10 - $25 Million Award;
Allied Concrete projects $25 – $50 Million Award; and the
AECOM projects over $50 Million Award.
Please note that the cost bands are indicative only and the actual cost-bands will be at the discretion of the Judges who are tasked with achieving an even spread of entries across the six cost-band categories.

The other five categories are the:
James Hardie Innovation Award, recognising innovation in the industry demonstrated within a project, or through an innovative new product or procedure;
Site Safe Safety Excellence Award, recognising excellence in either ‘Safety in Design’, or by way of safety initiative on a construction site;
• 2018 Metro Performance Glass Consultants Award. New for 2018, this award recognises high performance of design consultants (architects, engineers, quantity surveyors or project managers) who have contributed to the design, documentation and delivery stages of a successful project;
Hays Construction Interdisciplinary Collaboration Award, another new award for 2018, recognising exceptional examples of collaborative partnerships between consultant(s) and contractor; and
BCITO Young Achiever Award, identifying and recognising younger building industry practitioners who possess high level capability and can point to a career to date that is marked with significant achievement. Nominees for this award must be under the age of 30 as at 11 May 2018.

The winners of the six cost-based categories and the Innovation Award, Safety Excellence Award, Consultants Award and the Interdisciplinary Collaboration Award are eligible for a Supreme Award, the GIB® sponsored Supreme Award. This is the New Zealand Building Industry Awards highest honour, recognising outstanding performance.

For more information about the New Zealand Building Industry Awards and to enter online, visit: www.nzbuildingindustryawards.org.nz

The Award recipients will be announced at a Gala Dinner at the Cordis Hotel, formerly the Langham, in Auckland on Friday 24 August 2018.

Malcolm Fleming said, “Past Award winners have included many of the building industry’s high achievers, which reflects the Award’s stature, as does the fact that a number of past Young Achiever winners now hold very senior roles within the sector. The 2018 winners will likewise follow this trajectory.”

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Smelter: Tiwai Deal Gives Time For Managed Transition

Today’s deal between Meridian and Rio Tinto for the Tiwai smelter to remain open another four years provides time for a managed transition for Southland. “The deal provides welcome certainty to the Southland community by protecting jobs and incomes as the region plans for the future. The Government is committed to working on a managed transition with the local community,” Grant Robertson said. More>>

ALSO:

Economy: Strong Job Ad Performance In Quarter Four

SEEK Quarterly Employment Report data shows a positive q/q performance with a 19% national growth in jobs advertised during Q4 2020, which includes October, November and December. Comparing quarter 4, 2020, with the same quarter in 2019 shows that job ad volumes are 7% lower...More>>

NIWA: 2020 - NZ’s 7th-warmest Year On Record

The nationwide average temperature for 2020, calculated using stations in NIWA’s seven-station temperature series which began in 1909, was 13.24°C (0.63°C above the 1981–2010 annual average). New Zealand’s hottest year on record remains 2016, when... More>>

Quotable Value New Zealand: Property Market Set To Cool From Sizzling To Warm In 2021

Nostradamus himself could not have predicted the strange series of events that befell our world in 2020 – nor the wild trajectory of New Zealand’s property market, which has gone from “doom and gloom” to “boom and Zoom” in record time. Even ... More>>

PriceSpy: Research Reveals How Shopping Behaviours Have Changed This Christmas

According to a new survey* from PriceSpy , almost 50 per cent of Kiwis are looking to shop locally this Christmas in light of Covid-19; The research also found consumers are changing their shopping habits, with one in seven (14 per cent) getting super-organised ... More>>

Commerce Commission: Noel Leeming Group Warned For Making Delivery Representations Without Reasonable Grounds During COVID-19 Lockdown

Noel Leeming Group has been warned by the Commerce Commission for making delivery representations about two products which, in the Commission’s view, it did not have reasonable grounds for at the time the representations were made. The warning ... More>>