Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

ANZASW statement for Waitangi Day

The Aotearoa New Zealand Association of Social Workers (ANZASW) joins members, the social work profession as a whole and all New Zealanders in celebrating our National Day.

ANZASW views Waitangi Day as an opportunity to reflect on Te Tiriti o Waitangi / the Treaty of Waitangi, the commitments that were made back in 1840 to Tangata Whenua and the challenges this nation has faced since that time.

The Social Work professional is guided by ethics and principles that prompt us to support justice and recognise the values and beliefs that are uniquely Māori.

Social work practitioners and colleagues in associated professions have long advocated for the rights of Tangata Whenua for many years, using Te Tiriti as a legal basis for these claims. The fingerprints of this movement can be seen in such government-commissioned seminal reviews and studies as Pūao-te-Ata-Tū (1988), Te Punga (1994) and Te Pounamu: manaaki tamariki, manaaki whānau (2001), which had a lasting impact on the relationship between Māori and state agencies.

ANZASW member and Auckland University Academic Dr Liz Beddoe told the Association that “to me, the treaty absolutely embodies a commitment to human rights and to social justice.”

‘What we see is that the treaty is a living document- it may be a piece of fading paper- but it is in actually embodied in the everyday relationships between Māori, Pakeha and other peoples in Aotearoa,” she added. Dr Beddoe argues that the principles of the treaty should be honoured through addressing inequalities between Māori and non-Māori that continue to persist.

“It does require us to be constantly cognisant of things like health inequality, inequalities in participation in education- and the dramatic increase in Māori children in care...the differences in life expectancy,” Dr Beddoe noted.

With such inequalities in mind, ANZASW recognises the strategic vision of the Child and Youth Wellbeing Strategy as a step in the right direction; the requirement for Government Departments to report on the outcomes those organisations for Māori may go some way to address the inequity that is present in our communities.

The Association is mindful there has been some progress made in addressing the injustices, but also the need for much more investment and support for Maori whanau and their communities to flourish and be self-determining.

ANZASW member Kohi Waihi commented that “there have been number of things that have been achieved over the years, but the sense I get is that, I don’t think this happened to the fullest extent, particularly in the social service setting.”

“From a funding perspective, the investment in Maori Organisations to build the capability and capacity of these services has not been enough. The under-investment is in spite of the statistics which say that we [Māori] make up most of the client group,” he observed.

This Waitangi Day, the Association celebrates the fact that Te Tiriti unites Tauiwi and Māori in partnership and provides Tangata Whenua with a legal means through which to seek justice, as well as to assert their Tino Rangatiratanga (sovereignty).

ANZASW wishes its members and all New Zealanders a happy Waitangi Day and hopes that the commemoration of our National Day will bring the peoples of these islands together as a community, moving forward toward a future of greater justice, equity and pai ora.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Air New Zealand: Capital Raise Deferred

Air New Zealand has decided to defer its planned capital raise to later in 2021 allowing more time to assess the impacts of recent developments on the airline’s path to recovery. 'We’ve seen some clearing of COVID-19 clouds recently, with ... More>>

Commerce Commission: Cartel Conduct Now Punishable By Up To 7 Years’ Jail Time

Cartel conduct can now be punished with a term of imprisonment of up to 7 years, after the Commerce (Criminalisation of Cartels) Amendment Act 2019 came into effect today. Cartel conduct includes price fixing, market allocation and bid rigging (see ... More>>

Stats NZ: Auckland Population May Hit 2 Million In Early 2030s

Auckland’s population may rise from about 1.7 million currently to 2 million by early next decade, Stats NZ said today. “Auckland will likely have the highest average annual growth of New Zealand’s 16 regions over the next 30 years, from ... More>>

Air New Zealand: Business Travellers Return To The Skies In Record Numbers

After a year of talking to a computer, Kiwis are leaving the office to re-connect with their clients, suppliers, and staff. New figures released by Air New Zealand show domestic business and corporate travel has defied global trends by returning ... More>>

PwC: Outcome Of Review Into Air New Zealand Gas Turbines Business

Air New Zealand has received the report into its Gas Turbines business from independent external advisers PwC. Air New Zealand Chairman Dame Therese Walsh says the report identified a range of effective controls in the Gas Turbines revenue contracting ... More>>

LPG Association: Renewable LPG Achieves Emissions Budgets With No Need To Ban New LPG Connections

Renewable LPG can supply New Zealand’s LPG needs and achieve the emissions reductions proposed by the Climate Commission without the need to ban new connections, a new study shows. The investigation, by leading consultancy Worley, was prepared for the ... More>>

Commerce: House Values Continue To Climb As New Government Measures Announced

The Government’s new initiatives to quell the rocketing housing market were announced last week, just as house prices hit a new high for the end of March. The average value increased 7.8% nationally over the past three-month period, up from the 6.8% ... More>>